Sneak peek at some ‘treasures’ to be found at campus yard sale

Northeastern’s annual Trash2Treasure sale will take place this Sunday at the Curry Stu­dent Center, where a wide variety of donated items will be on sale at reduced prices. Take a look at some of the more unique items that will be available.

Five tips to make off-​​campus move-​​in a breeze

Stu­dents this weekend will move into off-​​campus housing around Boston. We spoke with the Off-​​Campus Stu­dent Ser­vices and com­piled this list of helpful tips to help ease the stress of the big day.

New open-​​road tolling expected to bring faster commutes but bothersome billing

In October the Mass­a­chu­setts Turn­pike, the main east-​​west thruway for the com­mon­wealth, will con­vert to a cash­less and open-​​road toll system. And while com­muting may be easier for motorists, trans­porta­tion expert Peter Furth cau­tions the fare col­lec­tion can cause headaches. Here he dis­cusses the Mass Pike plan and the technology’s use beyond the Bay State.

Take 5: Watch high-​​flying hot dog cruise into the Charles River

Red Bull Flugtag, a demon­stra­tion in avi­a­tion exper­i­men­ta­tion, is coming to Boston Sat­urday. Here are five things you need to know about this unique event, including some quirky facts about the North­eastern team that will be com­peting as well as its flying hot dog. That’s right…flying hot dog.

National fitness movement November Project takes global step forward

Almost five years ago, North­eastern alumni Bojan Man­daric and Brogan Graham launched a fit­ness move­ment called November Project. The orga­ni­za­tion now counts tribes in more than 25 cities around North America and will soon wel­come London and Ams­terdam. We caught up with Man­daric and Graham to talk about November Project’s inter­na­tional appeal, which includes a recently pub­lished book and a forth­coming documentary.

What’s that bruise on Michael Phelps’ shoulder?

From cir­cular bruises, to col­orful tapes, to one-​​arm sleeves, Olympic ath­letes have been sporting some unique mark­ings and add-​​ons during the Rio de Janeiro Games. We asked a group of pro­fes­sors to explain what you’ve been seeing, with a par­tic­ular focus on the sci­ence behind it.

3Qs: Why better infrastructure could solve Rio’s water problems

The Olympic sailing com­pe­ti­tion began on Monday in Rio de Janeiro’s Gua­n­abara Bay, the site of exten­sive water pol­lu­tion that offi­cials have warned is a health risk for the ath­letes. Here, Geoff Trussell, director of Northeastern’s Marine Sci­ence Center, explains how bad the pol­lu­tion can be for the aquatic ecosystem and what needs to be done to fix the problem.

3Qs: The ‘perfect storm’ that led to Brazil’s drastic and rapid decline

The state of Brazil in 2009, when Rio de Janeiro was awarded the Summer Olympics, stands in stark con­trast to the state of the nation today. As the world turns its focus to Rio for tonight’s Opening Cer­e­monies, asso­ciate pro­fessor Thomas Vicino explains Brazil’s change of fortune.

Russian athlete ban, not Rio prep, to be 2016 Olympics’ legacy

The 2016 Summer Olympics are finally here, opening this week in Rio de Janeiro amid a plethora of con­cerns, including the Zika virus, water con­t­a­m­i­na­tion, and civil unrest. Here, Olympics expert and asso­ciate teaching pro­fessor Philip D’Agati explains what we can expect and says of the city, “Their plan­ning hasn’t been that bad.”

3Qs: Social media and the success of viral campaigns

With news last week that money raised by the Ice Bucket Chal­lenge helped fund break­throughs in ALS research, we asked assis­tant pro­fessor of mar­keting Yakov Bart how social media has helped to ele­vate suc­cessful viral cam­paigns, and why Snapchat could be the future plat­form for those campaigns.