What’s that bruise on Michael Phelps’ shoulder?

From cir­cular bruises, to col­orful tapes, to one-​​arm sleeves, Olympic ath­letes have been sporting some unique mark­ings and add-​​ons during the Rio de Janeiro Games. We asked a group of pro­fes­sors to explain what you’ve been seeing, with a par­tic­ular focus on the sci­ence behind it.

3Qs: How ‘nomadic architecture’ will shape Rio’s Olympic legacy

Two venues at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro—the 12,000-seat Future Arena and the 15,000-seat Aquatic Stadium—will be dis­man­tled and rebuilt into entirely new build­ings fol­lowing the games. We asked assis­tant pro­fessor David Fannon, an archi­tect and building sci­en­tist, to explain how Rio’s reliance on “nomadic archi­tec­ture” might ben­efit Brazil in the decades to come.

How to handle the extreme heat

Hot, hazy, and humid. That’s the fore­cast for the next few days. With heat index values in the triple digits, the National Weather Ser­vice has issued a heat advi­sory for the Boston area. We asked John Wong, director of clin­ical ser­vices at Uni­ver­sity Health and Coun­seling Ser­vices, to offer some tips to keep cool and how to spot heat-​​related health issues early on.

3Qs: What is greatness—and how do you achieve it?

More than 11,000 ath­letes are com­peting at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, show­casing their supe­rior skill in nearly 40 dif­ferent sports. We asked Rachel Rodgers, asso­ciate pro­fessor in the Depart­ment of Applied Psy­chology, to define the con­cept of great­ness and explain how everyday people might tap into their own great­ness, regard­less of wealth, fame, or skill set.

3Qs: Why better infrastructure could solve Rio’s water problems

The Olympic sailing com­pe­ti­tion began on Monday in Rio de Janeiro’s Gua­n­abara Bay, the site of exten­sive water pol­lu­tion that offi­cials have warned is a health risk for the ath­letes. Here, Geoff Trussell, director of Northeastern’s Marine Sci­ence Center, explains how bad the pol­lu­tion can be for the aquatic ecosystem and what needs to be done to fix the problem.

A ‘Monster’ look at one student’s global co-​​op in Iceland’s music scene

In high school, Madi Murphy’s pas­sion for music inspired her to launch a fan club ded­i­cated to the Ice­landic band Of Mon­sters and Men. At North­eastern, a co-​​op took her to Ice­land where she worked for the band—and did so much more.

3Qs: Why voting rights rulings will help the Democrats at the polls

Over the past two weeks, courts in five states have ruled against voter ID and proof-​​of-​​citizenship laws, citing their dis­crim­i­na­tory impact on minori­ties. Martha Davis, law pro­fessor and human rights expert, says that the court rul­ings will likely favor the Democ­rats, par­tic­u­larly in the swing states where restric­tive voter laws have been struck down.

Researchers find that Android apps can secretly track users’ whereabouts

New research led by North­eastern pro­fessor Gue­vara Noubir reveals that some Android apps may auto­mat­i­cally transmit sen­si­tive infor­ma­tion, such as the routes you travel, through the phone’s built-​​in sen­sors. A mali­cious devel­oper, he says, “can infer where you live, where you’ve been, where you are going.”

3Qs: The ‘perfect storm’ that led to Brazil’s drastic and rapid decline

The state of Brazil in 2009, when Rio de Janeiro was awarded the Summer Olympics, stands in stark con­trast to the state of the nation today. As the world turns its focus to Rio for tonight’s Opening Cer­e­monies, asso­ciate pro­fessor Thomas Vicino explains Brazil’s change of fortune.