North­eastern senior Rocky Slaughter is lucky he just turned 21. Oth­er­wise he wouldn’t have been eli­gible – let alone a top-​​50 finalist – for what is being billed as “A Real Goode Job,” with Murphy-​​Goode, a winery in Sonoma County’s Alexander Valley. The winner gets to explore Sonoma vine­yards for six months, tasting hun­dreds of wines and reporting on the expe­ri­ence via social media such as Twitter and Face­book. The gig pays $60,000.

The catch? There is no catch: “Murphy-​​Goode is trying to create the dream job,” says the web-​​savvy Slaughter. To land the posi­tion, he cre­ated a 60-​​second video explaining why Murphy-​​Goode should choose him out of nearly 2,000 can­di­dates. And the polit­ical sci­ence major has lots of rea­sons: he’s a web-​​designer with a pho­tog­raphy studio (called Hap­pens, LLC); he’s per­formed with the alter­na­tive rock band Weezer; and he’s done TV inter­views with polit­ical pun­dits like Tucker Carlson (Slaughter “could be Pres­i­dent of the United States someday,” Carlson said in the interview).

As Michael Dukakis, North­eastern dis­tin­guished pro­fessor of polit­ical sci­ence notes in the video, “Who could pos­sibly forget a name like Rocky Slaughter?”

Watch Slaughter’s “Really Goode Job Appli­ca­tion” at
http://​www​.are​al​ly​good​ejob​.com/​v​i​d​e​o​-​v​i​e​w​.​a​s​p​x​?​v​i​d​=​X​q​V​o​-​c​N​d​46M

Slaughter, who counts Cabernet and Syrah as two of his favorite types of wine, calls the poten­tial Web 2.0 job a one-​​of-​​a-​​kind oppor­tu­nity. As the fabric of our cul­ture con­tinues to be sat­u­rated by social net­working and video-​​sharing sites, blogs, and wikis, he explains, those who carve out a niche in the industry will reap a moun­tain of pro­fes­sional benefits.

Quite a few doors are already opening left and right,” Slaughter says.

Ear­lier this week, for example, Slaughter received a Skype mes­sage at 9:15 a.m. from an exec­u­tive at Soft­press, a soft­ware pub­lishing com­pany based in Eng­land. The exec­u­tive had watched his video appli­ca­tion and checked out rock​ys​laughter​.com and wanted to chat with Slaughter about a poten­tial job pro­ducing tuto­rial videos and serving as the pub­lishing company’s web­site spokesperson.

Slaughter is used to the atten­tion he’s gar­nered as a result of his run toward landing the Goode job (he already beat out Tech TV host Martin Sar­gent for the gig). Ear­lier in the year, he fin­ished 61st among 34,000 appli­cants vying for the oppor­tu­nity to live on an Aus­tralian island and blog about the expe­ri­ence. As a high-​​school senior, he tried to pass a statewide bill that would offer stu­dents more nutri­tional infor­ma­tion about soda and other drinks on drink machines in high schools. He scored a bunch of pub­licity for the effort, granting inter­views to the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the San Fran­cisco Chron­icle and Tucker Carlson’s former show on MSNBC.

The Red­ding, Calif., native credits North­eastern for much of his suc­cess. In prepa­ra­tion for a slew of inter­views with Northern Cal­i­fornia media out­lets on his bid to win the Murphy-​​Goode gig, he’s drawing on argument-​​construction and speech-​​writing tech­niques he learned in courses at North­eastern. And he lauds the university’s unwa­vering sup­port of entre­pre­neur­ship among its stu­dents. “Everyone at North­eastern really sup­ports you get­ting a job,” he says. “The first pri­ority at this uni­ver­sity is the co-​​op, and that’s pretty obvious.”

I have a problem saying ‘yes’ to too many projects,” he explains. “But the cool part is that it works for people who say ‘yes’ to go to North­eastern because…Northeastern is the ‘big enabler’ for building a port­folio and resume.”

Murphy-​​Goode will announce the top 10 final­ists for the Web 2.0. job on July 7. But Slaughter thinks he has a good shot to make it all the way to the winner’s circle. He has already met the company’s wine­maker, David Ready, Jr., at a func­tion in New York’s Grand Cen­tral Sta­tion and again at a restau­rant in Boston’s Finan­cial District.

As a New York Times article on the Murphy-​​Goode con­test put it, “The posi­tion of social media specialist…has become the hottest new cor­po­rate job among the Twitterati.”

Slaughter couldn’t agree more. “This could be a huge gateway to new web jobs,” he says. “With the Internet, every­thing is so imme­diate. Those who can suc­cess­fully market with Web 2.0 tech­nolo­gies will rise to the top very fast.”

Update:Slaughter is one of 10 final­ists for becoming Murphy-Goode’s wine country lifestyle cor­re­spon­dent. The winner will be selected on July 21.

For more infor­ma­tion on Slaughter, please visit his web­site, www​.rock​ys​laughter​.comor follow him on Twitter: http://​twitter​.com/​r​o​c​k​y​s​l​a​u​g​h​ter