For more than a decade, thousands of Northeastern students have shared their cutting-edge research projects with the public at the annual Research and Scholarship Expo. This year, the expo joined forces with the university’s Center for Research Innovation, which serves as a catalyst for advancing research across the university, and was aptly renamed the Research, Innovation, and Scholarship Expo, or RISE.

More ideas and inventiveness than ever were on display at RISE:2012 in the Cabot Center, creating a palpable current of entrepreneurship and collaboration. From providing computer accessibility for the disabled to a plan for converting plastics waste to electricity, this year’s expo showcased far-reaching undergraduate and graduate research across all disciplines.

  • 35 external judges participated—from law, technology, R&D, medicine, business, and marketing.
  • More than 400 posters were represented.
  • The total number of judges increased from 18 to 71 from last year.
  • The number of abstracts submitted increased by 30 percent over last year.

To kick off the inaugural RISE event, President Joseph Aoun awarded the first set of RISE grants: $1,000 each to four exceptional poster presentations.


AND THE WINNERS ARE…

Jessica Wilcock, a fifth-year architecture major, for her urban public-housing prototype promoting social sustainability.

Adam Morgan, E’12, a mechanical engineering major, for his embedded-sensor compression shirt and accompanying mobile app that monitors workouts.

Jeffrey Breugelmans, a doctoral student in industrial engineering, for advancing computer accessibility for the physically disabled.

Chris Bridges, a third-year law student, for his scholarly look at the lives lost to lynching and the ongoing need for restorative justice.

THE STARS OF RISE:2012 BY CATEGORY

The four RISE:2012 grant winners (listed above) were selected from among the top poster presentations in seven categories.

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES

Alessandro Calo, a third-year biology major, for identifying mechanisms for antibiotic tolerance in dormant bacterial cells.

Malak Alshawabkeh, a doctoral student in electrical and computer engineering, for designing effective hack-resilient systems with computer graphics chips.

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

Joseph Robinson, a third-year electrical and computer engineering major, for improving lung-tissue imaging technology.

Richard Ranky, a mechanical-engineering doctoral candidate, for 3-D printed medical devices with embedded sensors.

HEALTH SCIENCES

Meaghan Hitt, a fifth-year physical-therapy major, for testing whether early physical-therapy education helps breast cancer surgical candidates.

Tao Wang, a doctoral student in pharmaceutical sciences and drug delivery systems, for his testing of nanoparticles for treating breast cancer in mice.

HUMANITIES AND ARTS

Jessica Wilcock (see grant winners and in photo above)

Geri-Ann Quinlivan, a master’s student in architecture, for the use of plants for the removal of ground contaminants and revitalization of abandoned industrial sites.

INTERDISCIPLINARY TOPICS, CENTERS, AND INSTITUTES

Adam Morgan and Jeffrey Breugelmans (see grant winners above)

PHYSICAL AND LIFE SCIENCES

William Johnston, a second-year cognitive psychology and computer science major, for his look at how “visual” verb meanings are largely unaffected by congenital blindness.

Chao Chen, a doctoral student in biology, for an analysis of whether elective antimicrobials are effective for treating an infectious intestinal disease.

SOCIAL SCIENCES, BUSINESS, AND LAW

Jennifer Sturman and Dena Cox, both fifth-year sociology majors, and Christina Vergara, SSH’12, a criminal justice major, for their study on homicide offender recidivism.

Chris Bridges (see grant winners above)