Workshops

Workshops organized by the Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning Through Research provide a hands-on opportunity for faculty to delve into a specific topic, issue, or approach in teaching and learning. We offer distinct workshop series for faculty and graduate students. Led by one of your colleagues at CATLR, the events offer the opportunity to try out or work on an aspect of your course along with your colleagues both within and outside of your field. This interdisciplinary environment provides the opportunity to look at a variety of approaches to what is being discussed.

Workshops are interactive sessions, typically 90-minutes in length, facilitated by CATLR colleagues for Northeastern University instructors. In addition to our open workshop schedule, CATLR designs and facilitates workshops for departmental groups.

Contact Dr. Cigdem Talgar (c.talgar@neu.edu) if you are interested in discussing a customized workshop.

Upcoming Workshop Schedule

All workshops are single sessions. Registration is preferred. Click an event title to read more and to register for that session.

Title Date Audience Description
Facilitating Online Courses 9/3/2015 Online

As a follow-up to our Online Course Design Orientation Program, this session is appropriate for faculty who are new to online teaching, as well as experienced online instructors who want to enhance their practice.

Using Social Media for an Engaged Classroom 9/16/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

Through demonstrations of a variety of social media practices and discussions of key questions, this workshop will ask participants to consider how the social web may be impacting higher education and the learning implications this has for practice.

Design, Iterate and Innovate Teaching through Learning Analytics 9/23/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this workshop, we will discuss how learning analytics can be used to enhance student participation and promote deep learning.

(GRAD) Writing Your Statement of Teaching Philosophy 9/24/2015 Graduate Students/Post-Docs

In this workshop, we will explore the reflective and practical benefits of writing a statement of your teaching philosophy and discuss sample statements.

Reflect, Write, Repeat: Developing Your Statement of Teaching Philosophy 9/28/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this workshop, we will discuss the reflective and practical benefits of developing and periodically revisiting your statement.

Assessing Your Online Course: An Evidence-Based Approach to Enhancing Learning 9/29/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

Join us for the opportunity to self-assess your online course in a supportive workshop format.

Teaching and Learning in a “Dialogue of Civilizations” Course 9/30/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

This discussion-rich session will bring together new and experienced Dialogues teachers—as well as anyone interested in teaching one—to share lessons learned and evidence-based practices.

Deeper-Thinking Students: Using Contemplation in the Classroom to Promote Learning 10/1/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this workshop, we will explore concrete contemplative practices to help students both focus their attention and engage with the deeper structures in your discipline to create the foundation for the application of their knowledge across different contexts.

(GRAD) In and Beyond Portfolios: Documenting Your Teaching Effectiveness 10/7/2015 Graduate Students/Post-Docs

In this workshop, we’ll discuss samples of the types of materials that are commonly included, such as teaching evaluations, and consider strategies for representing these materials.

Learning through Oral Presentations, Part 1: Format, Audience, and Cognitive Load 10/8/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this first of two sessions, we will discuss and design learning opportunities that can be supported by diverse presentation formats, including formats like Pecha Kucha.

Untapped Potential: Leveraging Students’ Experiential Learning Backgrounds to Help Them Learn Course Content 10/14/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

This workshop explores how we can explicitly and actively help our students “bring experiential learning to class.” In particular, we’ll focus on how to activate students’ prior knowledge and experiences and promote their transfer of knowledge and skills to new contexts.

Promoting Deep Learning in a Globally Diverse Classroom 10/16/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

This workshop will focus on ways to leverage aspects of our increasingly global classrooms to create deeper learning environments for all of our students.

Flipping Your Classroom: Designing for In-Class Engagement 10/19/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this hands-on workshop, you will experience the flip, examine a few concrete examples of how to design a flipped lesson, and come away with concrete ideas for how flipping might work best in your own course.

(GRAD) Real-World and Course Connections: Integrating Students’ Experiential Learning Lessons into Your Class 10/19/2015 Graduate Students/Post-Docs

This workshop explores diverse ways that we can explicitly and actively help our students “bring experiential learning to class.” We’ll focus on how to activate students’ prior knowledge and experiences to promote their transfer to new contexts.

(GRAD) Microteaching Workshop: Improve Your Teaching through Practice and Feedback 10/20/2015 Graduate Students/Post-Docs

In this workshop, each participant will teach an 8- to 10-minute “microlesson” while the other participants roleplay as students.

Game-based Teaching Strategies to Leverage Student Autonomy, Mastery, and Motivation 10/21/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this workshop, we will discuss game-based methods to design activities that have been found to promote a strong sense of intrinsic motivation for learning.

Learning through Oral Presentations, Part 2: Preparation, Delivery, and Feedback 10/22/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

Building on the first of these two sessions, we will explore ways to help students prepare for and deliver more effective oral presentations that go beyond adhering to the stipulated time limit.

Designing Media for Learning 10/23/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

During this hands-on workshop, you will have the opportunity to assess a presentation of your own and identify ways in which you can leverage the way that humans process information to revise your presentation to efficiently and effectively promote learning.

Increasing Learning and Motivation through Inductive Teaching 10/26/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this interactive session, participants will see examples of inductive teaching and learn how it works. You will take away a preliminary plan for incorporating this approach into your courses.

Using Rubrics to Encourage Participation 10/28/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

This workshop will examine the benefits of participation to student learning and how the development of a participation rubric can promote that learning.

(GRAD) From Slides to Online Modules: Designing Multimedia to Facilitate Learning 11/2/2015 Graduate Students/Post-Docs

In this workshop, we’ll consider principles for multimedia design derived from over two decades of research. We’ll explore both what these principles look like in action and what strategies we can use to implement them.

Increasing Learning and Motivation through Problem- and Project-Based Learning 11/5/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this interactive session, you will explore what PBL is and how it works. You will come away with a preliminary plan for implementing PBL in your courses.

Using Rubrics to Guide and Evaluate Writing in STEM 11/13/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this workshop, participants will begin to draft a rubric for a writing assignment in their own STEM courses, discuss ways to use that rubric to help students perform at a higher level, and strategize ways to use the rubric for both quick grading and meaningful feedback to students.

Preparing for the Unexpected: Designing Courses with the Possibility of Cancellations in Mind 11/16/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

In this workshop, you will be presented with a number of options for conducting class at a distance, both synchronously and asynchronously, including the technical expertise and amount of preparation required for each approach.

Backwards Design: Developing New Northeastern Core Courses by Starting with the Outcomes 11/18/2015 Faculty/Post-Docs

During this workshop, we will introduce this robust approach to course design. With the support of learning scientists, you will have the opportunity to adapt the proposed outcomes outlined in the NU Core guidelines to fit your specific NU Core course.

Using Student-Developed Learning Outcomes to Promote Self-Directed Learning while on Co-op 11/20/2015 Co-Op

In this workshop led by learning scientists and Co-op faculty, we will explore Co-op learning outcomes as tools that drive self-directed learning on Co-op and as benchmarks that help the Co-op coordinator to better assess student professional development.

Facilitating Online Courses 12/14/2015 Online

Using a model that focuses on presence and interaction in online courses, we will explore a range of topics, such as faculty social presence, facilitating discussions and student interaction, setting communication expectations, and managing workflow in an online class.