Next Performance: January 29, 2013!

 

Due to high demand, In Our Name: A Play of the Torture Years will be peformed at Northeastern University School of Law on Tuesday, January 29, 2013, at 4 p.m. in 97 Cargill Hall. The performance is free and open to the public but seating is limited. RSVP to lawevents@neu.edu.

Following the performance, please join us for a panel discussion featuring:

Professor Lawrence Friedman (moderator) teaches Constitutional Law, Information Privacy Law, National Security Law, and State Constitutional Law at New England Law Boston. He has published numerous articles on these subjects as well as The Case for Congress: Separation of Powers and the War on Terror, which he wrote with Victor Hansen.

Peter Ellis is a retired trial attorney. He practiced for 35 years at Foley Hoag LLP in Boston, where he specialized in intellectual property, antitrust and complex product liability litigation. He graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School, and served as an officer in the Navy, first visiting Guantánamo Bay in the early 1960’s. He currently represents two Yemeni detainees there.

Professor Victor Hansen teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, and Prosecutorial Ethics at New England Law Boston. He served a 20-year career in the Army, most of that time as a JAG Corps officer. He has served as a regional defense counsel for the United States Army Trial Defense Service, as well as a military prosecutor. He is the author of several articles and books on criminal and military law, evidence and national security issues, and is an elected member of the American Law Institute

Stephen Oleskey is a partner in WilmerHale's Litigation/Controversy Department in Boston. Mr. Oleskey has been co-lead counsel since July 2004 in the case of Boumediene v. Bush, a federal habeas corpus suit which challenged the imprisonment of six men from Bosnia without charge or trial at Guantanamo Bay beginning January 20, 2002. The United States Supreme Court ruled on June 12, 2008, in the Boumediene case that the Guantanamo Bay detainees are constitutionally entitled to habeas corpus hearings. Following the first-ever Guantanamo habeas trial in November 2008, a federal court judge ordered five of the six men released immediately.  

Doris Tennant, of Tennant Lubell, LLC, in Newton, Massachusetts, with her law partner, Ellen Lubell, represented a Guantanamo detainee held for long periods in solitary confinement over eight years, until he was forcibly repatriated to Algeria She specializes in the out-of-court resolution of divorce and family matters, through collaborative law, mediation and negotiation.


Download the event flyer for more information.

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02.13.12 — The first dramatic reading In Our Name: A Play of the Torture Years, Professor Michael Meltsner’s searing depiction of how and why the nation found itself brutally treating the men it detained — some with good reason, some with stunning caprice — after 9/11, will take place on March 27 at the Boston Playwright’s Theatre. In May, the play will be performed by CUNY theater students in New York City.

In Our Name confronts the government rationalizations, the bizarre military hearings and the willful blindness of the public to what was happening behind barbed wire. “Americans have not fully confronted that what we did at Guantanamo and elsewhere tainted our reputation, and continues to question our commitment to justice and the rule of law,” says Meltsner, one of the nation’s leading authorities on capital punishment.

Brendan Shea of the American Repertory Theatre calls In Our Name a “living essay” in which the United States’ actions at Guantanamo are put on trial. “The play’s vibrant and visceral language is a great vehicle … to communicate the complex issues.”

In his storied career, Meltsner represented Muhammad Ali in the case that removed legal barriers barring his return to the boxing ring after refusing induction in the Army, tried the case that led to the integration of southern hospitals and was one of the initiators of the campaign that resulted in a nine-year moratorium of the use of capital punishment.

Meltsner’s memoir, The Making of a Civil Rights Lawyer, was published in 2006 (University of Virginia Press). Among his other writings are: Cruel and Unusual: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment (second edition 2011, Quid Pro Books); Public Interest Advocacy; Reflections on Clinical Legal Education; and Short Takes, a novel (second edition 2012, Quid Pro Books).

Boston Performances

March 27, 7:30 p.m

Boston Playwrights’ Theatre

949 Commonwealth Avenue
Free and open to the public but to seating is limited.

A distinguished panel will discuss the play at its conclusion. Panelists include:

Stephen Oleskey, a partner the law firm WilmerHale in Boston, served as co-lead counsel in Boumediene v. Bush, a federal habeas corpus suit which successfully challenged the imprisonment of six men from Bosnia without charge or trial at Guantanamo Bay. Following the first-ever Guantanamo habeas trial in November 2008, a federal court judge ordered five of the six men released immediately. Five of the six have left Guantanamo.   

Joshua Rubenstein has been professionally involved with human rights and international affairs for more than 35 years as an activist, scholar and journalist. He is the Northeast Regional Director of Amnesty International USA and a long-time associate of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard. His latest book is Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary’s Life.

Sabin Willett, a partner with the law firm Bingham McCutchen, led his firm’s team to landmark victories representing Guantanamo prisoners, including the first-ever review of a Guantanamo prisoner’s case under the Detainee Treatment Act and the first-ever habeas judgment, ordering prisoners’ immediate release into the United States

Doris Tennant, of Tennant Lubell in Newton, Massachusetts, who, with her law partner Ellen Lubell, represented a Guantanamo detainee held for long periods in solitary confinement over eight years, until he was forcibly repatriated to Algeria.

Find out more about this performance!

September 21, 4:00 p.m

Boston Playwrights’ Theatre

949 Commonwealth Avenue
Free and open to the public but to seating is limited so reserve your seat by sending a message to inournamenejccc@gmail.com. Sponsored by the New England Journal on Criminal and Civil Confinement and New England Law's Center for Law and Social Responsibility.

A distinguished panel will discuss the play at its conclusion. Panelists include:

Stephen Oleskey, a partner the law firm WilmerHale in Boston, served as co-lead counsel in Boumediene v. Bush, a federal habeas corpus suit which successfully challenged the imprisonment of six men from Bosnia without charge or trial at Guantanamo Bay. Following the first-ever Guantanamo habeas trial in November 2008, a federal court judge ordered five of the six men released immediately. Five of the six have left Guantanamo.   

Matthew Segal is the Legal Director of the American Civil Liberties Foundation of Massachusetts. A federal appellate criminal defense lawyer and civil litigator, Mr. Segal came to the ACLU of Massachusetts from the Appellate Division of the Federal Defenders of Western North Carolina, where he regularly argued cases before the Fourth Circuit.

Michael Mone Jr., of Esdaile, Barrett, Jacobs & Mone, in 2005 volunteered to represent on a pro bono basis a detainee imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay in a petition for writ of habeas corpus. His client, Oybek Jabbarov, was an Uzbek national cleared by the U.S. government to leave Guantanamo in February 2007, but he could not return to his native country for fear of persecution. For nearly two years, Mr. Mone advocated on his client’s behalf, focusing much of his efforts on persuading the Republic of Ireland to accept Mr. Jabbarov. In 2009, Ireland accepted him. He now lives there as a free man.

Dr. Elizabeth Wilson, Professor of Law at Seton Hall University Law School, worked on the early years of Boumediene v. Bush. She also coordinated and drafted the report by the Center for Constitutional Rights on Torture and Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and was involved in lobbying efforts to defeat the habeas stripping provisions of the Detainee Treatment Act. In addition, Dr. Wilson worked on habeas petitions brought on behalf of detainees in Bagram AFB and Pulicharky prison, Afghanistan (Ruzatullah v. Gates).

 

New York Performances 

May 9, 1:30 and 8:30 p.m.
May 14, 1:30 and 8:30 p.m.
May 23, 8 p.m.

Black Box Theater
New Building, 524 West 59th Street
Free and open to the public. Limited Seating

The New York performances will take place under the auspices of the John Jay College (CUNY) Theatre Arts Department. Under the direction of Professor Seth Baumrin, students will use the play as a workshop subject; performances in which they act and direct will serve as their final exam.

Baumrin, associate professor and chair of Communication and Theatre Arts at John Jay College, has directed more than 60 theater and opera productions. He is the author of Grotowski’s Poland: Poor Theatre, Party Politics, and Cultural Police, which will be published by Routledge this year.

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