The Program on the Corporation, Law and Global Society fosters interdisciplinary research and discussion among scholars, policymakers and advocates to examine the corporation as an institutional form with social significance akin to the state, the family or the city.

From this perspective, the corporation implicates social interests beyond those of shareholders and managers — the traditional “stakeholders” recognized in corporate law. The program seeks to generate new questions for research and richer, more complex and dynamic accounts of the significance of the corporation in global society by expanding the focus on “corporate governance” beyond the internal allocation of power among shareholders and managers within a single firm, and its global corollary, “comparative corporate governance” focused on the impact of domestic share ownership patterns in different countries.

To do so, the program encourages scholars to build on corporate law theory, firm theory, “old” and “new” institutional economics, development theory, economic sociology, organization studies, management studies, political theory, anthropology and other sources. Through expanding the paradigm of corporate law and corporation studies, the program aims to improve understanding of the role and limits of corporate law in the current global governance regime and to encourage new regulatory strategies for shaping the corporation and its institutional effects to contribute to a more just, equitable and accountable global order.