Planning for International travel can sometimes feel overwhelming. Some questions are common to many travel situations and can be easily answered. Find information on services, requirements, and resources that will assist you in the successful planning of your international activity.


Injuries that occur on the job are the responsibility of the employer.  In the U.S., we have workers compensation that will pay your related medical expenses and lost time for injuries that happen in the course and scope of your employment.   Other countries have similar type programs. They vary by country and in many cases, as in the U.S.,  they also vary by state or province.  Before you accept a co-op position, you should confirm with your employer that they are covering you for work related injuries.  If you have any questions or cannot get confirmation, please see your co-op advisor for assistance.

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Regardless of whether you are skiing, zip lining, or simply doing a bicycle tour outside of the program, the university’s assistance program (NU WorldAware) may be able to assist and provide you with resources to get the help and treatment that you need.  You will however be responsible for the medical bills as well as other expenses that may be incurred by you that result from your leisure time activities (e.g., special transportation or returning home if the injury is severe).

All students traveling abroad are required to have personal health insurance that will cover them for activities and travel outside of the NU program.  If you have NUSHP (Northeastern University Student Health Plan), this meets the requirement.  If you have health insurance other than NUSHP, you should check with your health insurance provider prior to departure to understand how it may (or may not) provide coverage overseas.  For additional information, please visit http://www.northeastern.edu/international-travel/insurance/

If you leave the program location to go skiing or engage in other free time activities (e.g. you are in France and go to Italy), you must register your side trip on “My Travel Plans” found on the myNEU Portal under the “services and links” tab, so that the university can plan for resources and be better able to assist you in the event of an emergency.  Please review the university’s guidance on side trips prior to your departure.  www.northeastern.edu/international-travel/side-trip-guidance/

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No.  The university does not provide insurance coverage for students renting or driving vehicles abroad.  This includes cars, vespas, motor scooters, motorcycles, and other types of powered vehicles.  You must have your own personal insurance for liability purposes if you plan to rent or drive a vehicle while abroad.  You are also responsible for any medical costs incurred as a result of you driving a vehicle overseas.  The university’s program does not provide this coverage.

Special Notes for Co-op Students:
If you are on a co-op abroad and your employer requires you to drive on business, you should ask your employer to confirm that you are covered under their insurance.   See your co-op advisor if you have any questions or cannot get confirmation.

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Northeastern University's Policy on International Travel requires the following:

AUTHORIZATION

  1. All university–sponsored international travel must be authorized by an immediate supervisor in advance of the travel.
  2. International travel in connection with sponsored research must follow the guidelines stated on the Office of Research Administration and Finance's (ORAF) (Click here for ORAF's Guidelines and Travel Checklist). There may be other restrictions when using sponsored funds. Please contact your ORAF representative and refer to the Policy on Travel & Expense Reimbursement.
  3. Staff and administrators may not travel to “high-risk” destinations on university-sponsored travel without approval for an exception to the travel policy.  Travelers must approval from their immediate supervisor and Senior Vice President, or designee, following consultation with the International Security Specialist in NUPD.
  4. No person in any category of traveler shall be required to travel to a location designated as a “high-risk” location.

ACCESS TO BENEFITS

  1. All staff and administrators are required to enter their travel plans in the Travel Registry.
    • Registered travelers will be eligible for insurance coverage, emergency assistance and other services.
    • Failure to register may impact access to and eligibility for such services, as well as travel expense reimbursement.
  2. Evaluation and recommendations regarding trip interruption and/or evacuation/recall will be made by ISSAC. Staff or administrators who fail to heed the instruction to interrupt or evacuate:
    • do so at their own risk,
    • may forfeit emergency travel insurance coverage, academic credit, tuition payments or expense reimbursement, and
    • may be held responsible for additional expense incurred by the university due to the individual’s refusal to follow policy.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

  1. CONNECTIVITY: Group leaders traveling with students as well as all travelers to “high-risk” locations and sanctioned territories must have reliable mobile or satellite phones or other communication devices approved by ISSAC that operate in the planned country(ies) visited.
  2. EXPORT CONTROLS: Travelers must comply with applicable laws and the university’s Export Control Policy and make appropriate notifications as outlined in the Policy on Export Control.

 

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Yes.  The University provides coverage for accidents (including repatriation) that occur while you are away on a university-sponsored program or work-related activity, but does not cover you for routine sickness or medical needs while you are out of the country.

The Policy on International Travel requires "All students undertaking University-sponsored International Travel must possess personal health insurance that meets minimum standards as prescribed by the university."  Personal health insurance coverage varies by vendor and type. Therefore, all travelers should call their insurance company and ask about coverage in the destination countries. The U.S. Department of State suggests some questions to ask your insurer, including:

  • Does my plan cover emergency expenses abroad such as returning me to the United States for treatment if I become seriously ill?
  • Do you require pre-authorizations or second opinions before emergency treatment can begin?
  • Do you guarantee medical payments abroad?

The university recommends travelers ask how the billing and payment for any services provided overseas will be handled and what paperwork you may need to make a claim. Travelers should request a full summary of benefits out of country.

If you have questions about university provided travel insurance, please email Risk Services at insurance@northeastern.edu

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The university provides traveler on sponsored programs with emergency response resources.  In the event of a university travelers needs assistance, call one of the following options:

  1. The local emergency number.  Travelers should fully understand the capabilities of the host nation prior to arriving at your destination.  Email iso@northeastern.edu to request information about a host nation's emergency services.
  2. Call WorldAware's 24/7 Response Operations Center (ROC) at +1 312.470.3108.  The ROC will connect travelers with health and safety resources around the world.
  3. Northeastern Police at the non-emergency number +1.617.373.2121 or emergency number +1.617.373.3333.

If traveling in an organized trip (e.g., Dialogue, Alternative Spring Break etc.) contact your trip leader to information them about the emergency.  The trip leader is responsible for completing an incident report once the emergency has subsided.

If you are not part of a group (e.g., Coop, study abroad, meeting etc.), call Northeastern Police at the non-emergency number +1.617.373.2121 or emergency number +1.617.373.3333. NUPD will then contact the other appropriate offices or organizations who can further assist you in managing the emergency.  NUPD will ensure your program advisor, supervisor, or department chair is aware of the incident and complete an incident report.

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Preparation is a a proven method to increase your safety abroad and reduce the abilities of those who wish to victimize travelers.  The university recommends you:

  1. Learn about your destination and the area you will reside prior to departing
    • Know what man-made and environmental risks occur in your host country
    • Review travel warnings and alerts
    • Ask the your program, the International Safety Office, and/or previous university travelers about your destination.
    • Understand how your in-country embassy can help during an emergency.
  2. Have a plan.
    • Establish communication plans with your family, the university, and other travelers on your trip
    • Develop contingency plan, such as sheltering-in-place and/or departing your residence for a safer location.
    • Know how to use the university's response programs, urgent and emergency assistance, and your personal health insurance.
  3. Register with assistance providers.
    • Register your trip in the university's travel registry (found in the MyNEU Portal at "My Travel Plans" under the "Self Services" tab).
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) or your country of origin's equivalent citizens services or embassy. (Note: non-US Citizens can enroll in STEP to receive destination alerts/warning, but are not able to use the US Embassy's resources during an emergency).
  4. Understand how to contact emergency services.
    • Know the host country's laws and health/security services capability.
    • Save the WorldAware urgent and emergency contact number(+1 312.470.3108) in multiple locations.
    • When in doubt, call NUPD's emergency number.
  5. Attend a pre-departure orientation.
  6. Take a NUPD safety class, such as RAD/Self Defense or CPR.
  7. Enroll in a first aid or trauma course.

For assistance in creating plans or learning about a destination consult with the NUPD's International Safety Office (email: iso@northeastern.edu)

For questions about university provided urgent and emergency insurance and when travelers are required to use their personal health insurance consult with university Risk Services (email insurance@northeastern.edu).

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Remember that all Northeastern University policies including the NU Code of Conduct follow you wherever you are in the world. If you over consume, you may still be subject to sanctioning from the conduct office. While drinking may be legal in other countries, over consumption is still a violation of the Northeastern Code of Conduct.

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Usually, you will not be able to get prescription medication in another country based on a US doctor’s authorization.You should always talk with your doctor before going overseas for any length of time, have enough supply of your medication to last the length of your planned stay and have an emergency plan should your prescription be lost or stolen.

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Laws and customs vary greatly around the globe, it is best to research your intended destination before you go.

The university also subscribes to iJET's LGBTQI+ PRISM Annual Report and Quarterly Newsletter.  Contact the International Safety Office via iso@northeastern.edu to obtain an electronic copy of the newsletter.

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Planning ahead is always important. Understanding your destination will always help you best prepare before you go. You could also contact the Northeastern Disability Resource Center for assistance by calling 617-373-2675 or via Relay: 711 or by email at DRC@neu.edu.

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The Center for Disease Control has information regarding any specific vaccination requirements as well as other precautionary dietary, water and environmental considerations with which you should be aware.

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The university's Policy on International Travel uses three indicators to determine if a country, city, or region presents a "high risk" to travelers.

  1. Countries with current U.S. Department of State Travel Warnings.
  2. Countries and cities designated with a risk rating of "High" (Level Four) or "Very High" (Level Five) by WorldAware, the university's international response provider.
  3. Areas or regions under a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Travel Notice Warning Level 3.

Visit this webpage for a list of high-risk destination. The University reserves the right as its sole discretion to designate other locations as “high-risk.”

Please contact your program or NUPD's International Security Office to learn more about the university's requirements for sponsored travel to high risk destinations.

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Academic or business travel taken by Northeastern faculty, staff, administrators, and students authorized, funded, coordinated, or administered, by Northeastern University. Such travel may include but is not limited to teaching, research, consulting, coop, service, administrative work, field studies, volunteer work, performances, athletic contests, and trips abroad in connection with any university recognized student organization, academic or administrative unit.

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Travel undertaken outside of the 50 United States, and or U.S. Territories or Possessions.

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The International Travel Policy outlines most policy information pertaining to students, staff and administrators. Additional information for students may also be found in academic departments, the Global Experience Office and this website.

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ISSAC is the International Safety and Security Assessment Committee. It is charged with providing advice, guidance, and recommendations to the Provost and Senior Vice Presidents in response to circumstances that present a safety concern where Northeastern community members are, or will be, participating in a university-approved activity. The ISSAC also proactively makes recommendations in response to changing world conditions regarding programs still in the planning stages.

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Any University related travel to countries found on the following lists require submission of an ISSAC Petition: US Department of State’s list of travel warning countries, WorldAware’s Watch List of countries considered either HIGH (risk level 4) or SEVERE risk (risk level 5), and The Center for Disease Control travel notices.

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Any University related travel to countries found on the following lists require submission of an ISSAC Petition: US Department of State’s list of travel warning countries,  WorldAware’s Watch List of countries considered either HIGH (risk level 4) or SEVERE risk (risk level 5) Centers for Disease Control Travel notices.

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GEO International Travel Coordinators, can help answer general questions. We can be reached at mytravelplans@northeastern.edu. Khushal Safi, the University’s International Security Specialist, can help answer questions regarding evacuation plans, emergency protocols, etc. He can be reached at k.safi@neu.edu or (617) 373-3212.

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It is best to complete and submit your Petition as soon as you know you intend to travel to a country requiring ISSAC review. Two months is recommended.

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No two Petitions are the same and some may require more time to review than others,however, once all the necessary information has been submitted and the Petition is complete, the committee will work to review and provide an answer within 2 weeks.

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Regardless of one’s country of origin, if you are traveling to a country deemed “high risk” on a University related program or trip, you are required to submit a Petition.

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ISSAC will make its recommendations to the Provost or appropriate Senior Vice President who will issue the final decision. There are no appeals.

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The Travel Registry is found by login into the myNEU Portal, choosing the "Services and Links" tab, and clicking on the "My Travel Plans" link.  Information about the registry and instructions for entering a traveler's itinerary can be found on the Registry webpage.

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Undergraduates should reach out to GEO to explain why you are unable to complete your itinerary as required and to let the office know when you will have all necessary details. All other travelers should contact the International Safety Specialist in NUPD.

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Check first with your study abroad program (if applicable), and next with the nearest embassy or consulate of the country(ies) to which you will be traveling. Information is also available at the State Department.

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WorldAware is Northeastern University’s 24/7 assistance program.  WorldAware coordinates the university's various international assistance and travel benefits for NU students, faculty and staff traveling on university-sponsored programs.  For more information visit the WorldAware webpage.

 

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Before departure, all undergraduate and graduate students must register on the University’s Travel Registry. Faculty and staff members are strongly encouraged to register. All travelers must contact their country’s citizen services. US Citizens accomplish this by registering with the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

Travelers are also encouraged to become familiar with the destination’s laws and customs. These may include, but are not limited to dress standards, photography restrictions, availability of communication systems, curfews, etc. Tell people where you are going and establish points of contacts among your travel group, host institution and family members at home. Discover and document local emergency numbers and the number for your nearest embassy or consulate. Have an emergency plan in place. Know where your safe locations are and who you would contact for immediate assistance. Checking out the U.S. State Department Site and WorldAware is a great way to get some important information.

Travelers are also encouraged to meet with NUPD’s International Security Office and/or consult WorldAware’s for a country brief, cultural awareness, and safety information.

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All travelers considering sponsored travel to a “high risk” destination must petition the International Safety and Security Advisory Council (ISSAC) for consideration and recommendation to the Provost or Senior Vice President regarding approval for the travel. You must also consult the International Security Specialist located in NUPD for a pre-travel country risk assessment. Check out the Petitions portion of the International Travel website for more information.

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You should back up your data before departing and travel with a clean computer. Use of VPNs and remote access while abroad typically keeps travelers more secure. Travelers won't lose data if the computer is misplaced or stolen, as their data remains on the NU servers in Boston. If you have any questions contact Northeastern University’s Office of Information Security at OIS@NEU.EDU and also please refer to the following links:

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Immediately ask to speak with a representative from the nearest embassy or consulate of your country of citizenship if you are arrested for any reason. Locations of U.S. Embassies may be found on their website. Embassy information worldwide for all travelers may be found at http://embassy.goabroad.com.

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Contact NUPD at the non-emergency number +1.617.373.2121 or emergency number +1.617.373.3333, local law enforcement, WorldAware and/or your embassy or consulate. When a traveler is the victim of a crime overseas, he or she may suffer from physical, emotional or financial injuries. It can be more difficult because the victim may be in unfamiliar surroundings, and may not know the local language or customs.The University offers these resources and is available to assist 24/7.

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You should let your trip leader know about any medical or behavioral health issues you have prior to leaving so that plans can be put in place to allow flexibility in the programing while you are on the trip. Trip leaders can also use the information to better plan for possible support in the area to which you are traveling. Finally, knowledge shared in advance may make the difference between having to leave the program early vs. getting appropriate care and completing the overseas experience.

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