NEU
Helmuth Lab

Middle School Lesson Plans


Carolina Crunch! Exploring Food Webs in the South Carolina Saltmarsh

Created by      Kimberly Schneider, University of South Carolina

Funded by        NSF K-12 Fellowship to K. Schneider

Implemented   St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC; Bythewood Middle School, Blythewood, SC; GK-12 teacher summer workshop 2006

Subject            7th Grade Science

Summary
This lesson explores food webs using organisms from the South Carolina Salt Marsh. Students read about the organisms and have to put together their own food web from the information provided. After making the food web students answer questions about food webs and must exhibit understanding of new vocabulary (e.g. omnivore, predator, producer).




Beat the Heat!!! Using infrared technology to explore the differences between warm and cold blooded organisms

Created by      Lindsay Watson and Kimberly Schneider, University of South Carolina

Funded by   NSF K-12 Fellowship to K. Schneider

Implemented  St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC; GK-12 teachers summer workshop 2006

Subject            7th Grade Science

Summary
This lesson will contrast warm-blooded and cold-blooded animals using pictures taken with an infrared camera. Students will visually explore differences between organisms radiating (in infrared) body heat and answer questions about the pictures they observe.




Where in the world is carbon?

Created by      Kimberly R. Schneider, GK-12 program, University of South Carolina **NOTE: some of the materials in the lesson were taken from the ChemSoc

Funded by   GK-12 NSF Fellowship

Implemented  St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC

Subject            7th Grade Science

Summary
Students will draw large pictures of the carbon cycle and then place pictures of the products of the cycle in the appropriate location.




What Do We Have In Common? (Comparing Bivalves to Humans)

Created by      Crystal Welch, Camden Middle School; Nouran Ragaban and Kimberly Schneider, University of South Carolina

Funded by   Rising Tide

Implemented  Camden Middle School, Camden SC; St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC

Subject            7th Grade Science

Summary
This is an easy dissection for middle school students. Students will dissect and observe mussels (or other bivalves) and compare the body system to humans. This lesson covers the differences between human body systems and other animal systems. It also is a good primer to other dissections or can stand alone if no other dissections will be done in the classroom.




Is it hot in here? Exploring the greenhouse effect and global climate change

Created by      Kimberly Schneider, University of South Carolina

Funded by   GK-12 NSF Fellowship

Implemented  St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC

Subject            7th Grade Science

Summary
The lesson will explore the greenhouse effect through a simple demonstration. Students will gain an understanding of the greenhouse effect, climate change, and global warming.




Who’s Dominant? Analyzing Traits of Mussels

Created by      Brice Gill, St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC

Funded by   NSF Research Experiences for Teachers

Implemented  St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC

Subject            7th Grade Science

Summary
Students create a mock population of two competitive species of mussels in order to examine the effects of varying traits on the mussels’ competitive advantage. The students will be able to (1) understand the role of dominant and recessive traits in an organism and (2) differentiate between the two species of mussels by their expression of certain traits.




It’s a Mystery: How PCR data can be used to determine distribution

Created by      Brice Gill, St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC

Funded by   NSF Research Experiences for Teachers

Implemented  St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC

Subject            7th Grade Science

Summary
Students examine salinity and wave action maps and compare those maps with the distribution of two species of mussels. The student will be able to (1) analyze PCR charts to determine the distribution of the two Mussel species and (2) hypothesize about what environmental conditions each species may prefer.




Who polluted the river?

Created by      Populations Connection (Population Connection); Modified by Kimberly R. Schneider (GK-12 program, Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina)

Funded by   GK-12 Fellowship

Implemented  St. Andrews Middle School, Columbia SC; NSF GK-12 summer teacher workshop 2006

Subject            Middle School Science

Summary
The histories of local rivers provide insight into the effect of population growth on a natural resource and the cumulative impact of individual actions.




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