eTOD Score is a pilot version of a “rating system” designed to identify neighborhoods and districts with built, social, and transit attributes that reduce driving, encourage higher transit ridership, and promote transit equity and accessibility.

eTOD Score

A Rating System for Equitable Transit-Oriented Development

 

TOD logo

The Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University and the Center for Transit Oriented Development (CTOD) have collaborated to produce a “rating system” to help planners, policymakers, community groups and municipal officials make better decisions about equitable transit-oriented development (TOD) planning and projects. The eTOD Score is an assessment tool designed to facilitate a better understanding of which transit-rich neighborhoods and which specific projects proposed for those neighborhoods are “the right kind” of equitable TOD.

This rating system is designed to identify neighborhoods and districts with built, social, and transit attributes that reduce driving, encourage higher transit ridership, and promote transit equity and accessibility. By providing a specific definition of high-performing, equitable TOD, this system can be used to catalyze and direct rapid policy change in support of both specific development projects and broader initiatives intended to plan or improve transit-rich neighborhoods.

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eTOD Score is composed of three subscores, capturing measures of transit, orientation, and development.

The composite and disaggregated eTOD Scores give an indication of the relative transit supportiveness of a station area, along with possibilities for enhancement. Places that are high on development and transit, but low on orientation (toward “transit-oriented neighbors” who make up the core of transit ridership) for instance, should be prime places for new affordable or workforce housing projects given their high levels of accessibility. Other areas may exhibit high proportions of transit-oriented populations, yet lack adequate transit or neighborhood-serving retail and services. These communities would be best suited for enhanced service and potential mixed-use or commercial development.

For a more detailed explanation of the rating system, including the construction of metrics, assignment of scores, and analysis of example stations, please see the eTOD Score Executive Summary. We welcome any feedback, comments or suggestions to help improve the system and make it more useful to the community of equitable TOD practitioners. Please email to Stephanie Pollack at s.pollack@neu.edu with your feedback.

The Dukakis Center and CTOD thank the Barr Foundation for its support of this project.

Click here to download the eTOD score variables.

 

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