CJ-Martinez

Ramiro Martinez

Professor of Sociology and Criminology and Criminal Justice
617.373.7066
education Ph.D., 1992, Sociology
The Ohio State University.
Mailing address 412 CH
360 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
Biography

Ramiro Martínez, Jr. is a professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice and the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Professor Martinez is a quantitative criminologist. Within that broad arena, his work contributes to violent crime research. His core research agenda asks how does violence vary across ecological settings, and, does violent crime and violent deaths vary across racial/ethnic and immigrant groups?

He and his collaborators assembled a multi-city team of researchers, graduate and undergraduate students to collect violence data directly from police departments and medical examiner offices in cities on or by the U.S./Mexican border (San Diego, San Antonio), in Miami, Florida which faces the U.S. border with the Caribbean, and other places, to answer these questions. This agenda has been funded through the NSF, NIH, NIDA, NIJ, and The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation.

Over the past fifteen years, Dr. Martinez has received several honors and awards. In 2011, he was a recipient of American Society of Criminology DPCC’s Lifetime Achievement for outstanding scholarship in the area of race, crime, and justice. He was also honored by his alma mater (formerly known as Southwest Texas State University) in 2009 with the Texas State University College of Liberal Arts Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award and the Texas State Alumni Association’s Alumni Achievement Award. In 2007 he was a recipient of American Society of Criminology DPCC’s Coramae Richey Mann Award for outstanding scholarship in the area of race, crime, and justice. In 2006 he was a recipient of the Florida International University Faculty Award for Excellence in Research and a Visiting Scholar, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Houston. He previously received the American Sociological Association Latinao Section Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research and a W.E.B. DuBois Fellowship from the National Institute of Justice. Since 2004 he has been a member of the National Science Foundation funded Racial Democracy, Crime and Justice-Network working group at The Ohio State University. At the national level, Martinez serves on the editorial boards of several academic journals and recently completed a three-year term as a member of the Sociology Advisory Panel at the National Science Foundation.

He publishes in sociology, criminology, criminal justice and ethnic studies journals.

Selected Publications

Books

Charis E. Kubrin, Marjorie S. Zatz, and Ramiro Martínez, Jr (Editors). Punishing Immigrants: Policy, Politics, and Injustice. New York University Press. In press 2012.

Ramiro Martínez, Jr. and Abel Valenzuela (Editors). Immigration and Crime: Race, Ethnicity and Violence. New York University Press. 2006.

Ramiro Martinez, Jr. Latino Homicide: Immigration, Violence, and Community.     New York City and London: Routledge Press. Taylor & Francis Group. 2002

Articles and Book Chapters Since 2000 

[58] Jacob I. Stowell, Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Jeffrey Cancino. “Latino Crime and Latinos in the Criminal Justice System:  Trends, Policy Implications, and Future Research Initiatives.” Forthcoming, Race and Social Problems.

[57] Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Jacob I. Stowell. 2012. “Extending Immigration and Crime Studies: National Implications and Local Settings.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Volume 641 (1), 174 – 192.

[56] Amie L. Nielsen and Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2011. “Nationality, Immigrant Groups, and Arrest: Examining the Diversity of Arrestees for Urban Violent Crime.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 27(3) 342–360.

[55] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. and Jacob I. Stowell. 2011. Latino Male Violence in the United States in Understanding the Disenfranchisement of Latino Males: Contemporary Perspectives on Cultural and Structural Factors. Edited by Noguera, Hurtado & Fergus, Routledge Press. Chapter 17, pp. 289-301.

[54] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2010. “Policy Essay: Economic conditions and racial/ethnic variations in violence: Immigration, the Latino paradox and future research.” Criminology & Public Policy, 9:4, 707-713.

[53]     Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2010. “Crime and Immigration” in The Criminologist: The Official Newsletter of the American Society of Criminology, 35,4, 16-17.

[52] Ramiro Martinez, Jr., Jacob Stowell and Matthew T. Lee. 2010. “Immigration and crime in an era of transformation: A Longitudinal analysis of homicides in San Diego neighborhoods, 1980-2000.” Criminology, 48,3: 797-829.

[51] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2010 “Revisiting the Role of Latinos and Immigrants in Police Research.” Chapter in Race, Ethnicity and Policing: New and Essential Reading, edited by Stephen K. Rice and Michael White. New York, NY: NYU Press.

[50] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2009. “Latino/a Criminology.” In Encyclopedia of Race and Crime. Eds. Helen T. Greene and Shaun L. Gabbidon. Sage Publications.

[49] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2009. “2-03. Citizenship and Crime.”In 21st Century Criminology: A Reference Handbook. Ed. J. Mitch Miller. Sage Publications.

[48] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2009. “Firearms and Violence.” In Oxford Bibliographies Online: Criminology. Ed. Richard Rosenfeld. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009-12-14. <http://www.oxfordbibliographiesonline.com>.

[47] Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2009. “Immigration, Crime, and Justice”. In Oxford Bibliographies Online: Criminology. Ed. Richard Rosenfeld. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009-12-14. <http://www.oxfordbibliographiesonline.com>.

[46]Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2009. “Race, Ethnicity, Crime, and Justice”. In Oxford Bibliographies Online: Criminology. Ed. Richard Rosenfeld. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009-12-14. <http://www.oxfordbibliographiesonline.com>.

[45] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2009. “Reduce Using Immigration Status to Address Crime.” In Natasha A. Frost, Joshua D. Freilich, and Todd R. Clear (Eds.), Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Policy: Policy Proposals From the American Society of Criminology Conference. Belmont, CA: Cengage/Wadsworth.

[44] Matthew T. Lee and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2009. “Immigration Reduces Crime: A Review of the Emerging Scholarly Consensus.” Chapter in Immigration, Crime and Justice. Sociology of Crime, Law, and Deviance, Volume 13: 3-16. Bingley, UK: Emerald/JAI Press. May.

[43] Ramiro Martínez, Jr. 2009. “Immigration and Homicide Studies: Guest Editor’s Introduction.” Homicide Studies, 13:207-210.

[42] Amie L. Nielsen and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2009. “The Role of Immigration for Violent Deaths.” Homicide Studies, 13: 274-287.

[41] Jacob I. Stowell, Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2009. “Ethnicity and Lethal Violence in Miami: Using Ethnic-Specific Measures of Immigration to Examine the Latino Paradox.” Homicide Studies August 13:315-324.

[40] Jeffrey M. Cancino, Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Jacob I. Stowell. 2009. “The impact of neighborhood context on Intra- and Inter-group robbery: The San Antonio Experience.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. May, Vol. 623, 12-24.

[39] Matthew T. Lee, Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Jacob Stowell. 2008. “Immigration and Homicide: A Spatial Analytic Test of the Social Disorganization Theory.” Journal of Social and Ecological Boundaries. Summer 3:2, pp. 9-31.

[38] Ramiro Martinez, Jr., Richard R. Rosenfeld and Dennis Mares. 2008. “The Impact of Drug Market Activity on Violent Crime.” Urban Affairs Review.           July Vol. 43:846-874.

[37] Ramiro Martinez, Jr., Jacob Stowell and Jeff Cancino. 2008. “A Tale of Two Border Cities: Community Context, Ethnicity, and Homicide.” Social Science Quarterly. March Vol. 89: 1-16.

[36] Ramiro Martinez Jr. 2008. “The Impact of Immigration Policy on Criminological Research.” Criminology & Public Policy. February Vol. 7, Issue 1: 501-507.

[35] Stowell, Jacob and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2007. “Displaced, Dispossessed, or Lawless? Examining the Link Between Ethnicity, Immigration, and Violence.” Aggression and Violent Behavior, 12:5,564-581.

[34] Martinez, Ramiro Jr. 2007. “Latino Crime and Delinquency in the United States.” In Latinas/os in the United States: Changing the Face of América, edited by Havidán Rodríguez, Rogelio Sáenz, and Cecilia Menjívar. Springer Press. (November)

[33] Martinez, Ramiro Jr. 2007. “Incorporating Latinos and Immigrants into Policing Research.” Criminology & Public Policy 6: 57-64.

[32] Nielsen, Amie L. and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2006. “Beyond Racial Dichotomies of Violence: Haitian Violence outside the Enclave.” In Immigration and Crime: Race, Ethnicity, and Violence, pp. 212-234, edited by Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Abel Valenzuela. New York: NYU Press.

[31] Lee, Matthew T. and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2006. “Immigration and Asian Homicide Patterns in Urban and Suburban San Diego.” In Immigration, Ethnicity, and Crime, pp. 90-116, edited by Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Abel Valenzuela. New York: NYU Press.

[30] Martinez, Ramiro Jr. 2006. “Coming to America: The Impact of the New Immigration on Crime.” In Immigration, Ethnicity, and Crime, pp. 1-21, edited by Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Abel Valenzuela. New York: NYU Press.

[29] Martinez, Ramiro Jr. and Amie L. Nielsen. 2006. “Extending Ethnicity and Violence Research in a Multi-Ethnic City: Haitian, African American and Latino Non-Lethal Violence.” In The Many Colors of Crime: Inequalities of Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America, pp. 108-121, edited by Ruth D. Peterson, Lauren J. Krivo, and John Hagan. New York: NYU Press.

[28] Nielsen, Amie L., Matthew T. Lee and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2005. “Integrating Race, Place, and Motive in Social Disorganization Theory: Lessons from a Comparison of Black and Latino Homicide Types in Two Immigrant Destination Cities.” Criminology Vol. 43:3.

[27] Nielsen, Amie L., Ramiro Martinez, Jr., and Matthew T. Lee. 2005. “Alcohol, Ethnicity, and Violence: The Role of Alcohol Availability and other Community Factors for Group-Specific Non- Lethal Violence.” The Sociological Quarterly 46: 479-502.

[26] Nielsen, Amie L., Ramiro Martinez, Jr., and Richard Rosenfeld. 2005. “Firearm Use, Injury, and Lethality in Assaultive Violence: An Examination of Ethnic Differences.” Homicide Studies, 8: 1-26.

[25] Martinez, Ramiro Jr., Matthew T. Lee and Amie L. Nielsen. 2004. “Local Context and Determinants of Drug Violence in Miami and San Diego: Does Ethnicity and Immigration Matter?” International Migration Review, 38: 131-157.

[24] Nielsen, Amie L. and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2003. “Reassessing the Alcohol and Violence Linkages: Results from a Multiethnic City.” Justice Quarterly, 20:445-469.

[23] Martinez, Ramiro Jr., Amie L. Nielsen and Matthew T. Lee. 2003. “Reconsidering the Marielito Legacy: Race/Ethnicity, Nativity and Homicide Motives.” Social Science Quarterly, 20:445-469.

[22] Martinez, Ramiro Jr. “Moving Beyond Black and White Violence: African American, Haitian and Latino Homicides in Miami.” 2003. In Interpersonal Violence: The Ethnicity, Race and Class Nexus, pp. 22-43, edited by Darnell F. Hawkins. New York City: Cambridge University Press.

[21] Lee, Matthew T. and Ramiro Martinez, Jr. 2002. “Social Disorganization Revisited: Mapping the recent immigration and Black Homicide Relationship in Northern Miami.” Sociological Focus, November 35: 363-380.

[20] Lee, Matthew T., Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and Richard Rosenfeld. 2001.”Does Immigration Increase Homicide Rates? Negative Evidence From Three Border Cities.” The Sociological Quarterly 42:559-580.

[19] Martinez, Ramiro Jr., Matthew T. Lee and Amie L. Nielsen. 2001. “Revisiting the Scarface Legacy: The Victim/Offender Relationship and Mariel Homicides in Miami.” Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, February (1):37-56. Reprinted in “Race, Crime, and Justice A Reader.” 2004. Edited by Shaun L Gabbidon, Helen Taylor Greene. Routledge.

[18] Martinez, Ramiro Jr. and Matthew T. Lee. 2000. “Comparing the Context of Afro-Caribbean Homicides in Miami: Haitians, Jamaicans and Mariels.” International Migration Review, Fall, 34(3): 793-811.

[17] Martinez, Ramiro Jr. and Matthew T. Lee. 2000. “Immigration and Crime,” in National Institute of Justice Criminal Justice 2000: The Nature of Crime: Continuity and Change, Volume 1, pp.485-524, edited by Gary LaFree, Robert J. Bursik, Jr., James F. Short, Jr. and Ralph B. Taylor. Washington DC: National Institute of Justice. Translated and reprinted in Revista Española de Investigación Criminológica. Número 2, año 2004 (Número Abierto).            <www.criminologia.net/Revista.htm>

[16] Lee, Matthew T., Ramiro Martinez, Jr. and S.Fernando Rodriguez. 2000. “Contrasting Latinos in Homicide Research: The Victim and Offender Relationship in El Paso and Miami.” Social Science Quarterly, March, 81:375-388.

[15]Martinez, Ramiro Jr. 2000. “Immigration and Urban Violence: The Link between Immigrant Latinos and Types of Latino Homicide.” Social Science Quarterly, March, 81:363-374.

Selected Honors & Awards

2011 Recipient, American Society of Criminology Division on People of Color and Crime Lifetime Achievement Award.

2009 Honoree, Texas State University College of Liberal Arts, Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award.

2009 Recipient, Texas State Alumni Association’s Alumni Achievement Award.

2007 Recipient, American Society of Criminology DPCC’s

2007 Coramae Richey Mann Award for outstanding scholarship in the area of race, crime, and justice.

2006 Recipient, Florida International University Faculty Award for Excellence in Research.

2006-2007 Visiting Scholar, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Houston.

2004-present, Member of NSF funded Racial Democracy, Crime and Justice-Network working group. The Ohio State University.Chaired by Ruth Peterson and Laurie Krivo.

2003 Recipient, American Sociological Association Latinao Section Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research.

2001 Recipient, W.E.B. DuBois Fellowship, National Institute of Justice.