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Bret Keeling

Lecturer in English
617.373.4540
education PhD, University of Washington
Mailing address 405 LA
360 Huntington Avenue,
Boston, MA 02115
Biography

Dr. Bret L. Keeling earned his Ph.D. in English literature at the University of Washington in Seattle. His research interests include modernism, gender and sexuality studies, writing studies, critical pedagogy, literary and critical theory, and service-learning. He’s published papers on H.D., Virginia Woolf, and E. M. Forster, and his most recent publication is “H.D. and the British Modernist Tradition” (in Approaches to Teaching H.D.’s Poetry and Prose (2011)). He frequently represents Northeastern University at national conferences, including, most recently, at NCTE (2013), MLA (2013), and CCCC (2012 and 2014 (forthcoming)). His current projects include “Music, Musicality, and Intimacy: Performing the Immaterial in Virginia Woolf’s The Voyage Out”; “Queer Pedagogies, Open Access, and the Social Imagination”; “Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield: The ‘Masculine’ and the ‘Social Imaginary.’”

 

Selected Publications

“H.D. and the British Modernist Tradition: Kora and Ka, Mythopoesis, and England’s ‘Great War’” (in Approaches to Teaching H.D.’s Poetry and Prose. Eds. Annette Debo and Lara Vetter, forthcoming)

“Modernist Anonymity and H.D.’s ‘Pygmalion’: Whose Story Is This?” (in Paideuma: Studies in American and British Modernist Poetry, 2005)

“Continuing Woolf: Postmodern Homages to Mrs. Dalloway” (in Illuminations: New Readings of Virginia Woolf. Ed. Carol Merli, 2004)

“‘No Trace of Presence’: Tchaikovsky and the Sixth in Forster’s Maurice” (in Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, 2003)

“H.D. and ‘The Contest’: Archaeology of a Sapphic Gaze” (in Twentieth Century Literature, 1998).

Current projects: “Music, Musicality, and Intimacy: Performing the Immaterial in Virginia Woolf’s The Voyage Out”; “Subject of Power / Object of Desire: D. H. Lawrence’s Gerald Crich and Masculinity’s (Im)Mobility”; “Sexual Marginality and the Creative Impulse: Robert Duncan Reading H.D.”