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CSSH Global Photography Contest 2013


For the inaugural CSSH Global Photography Contest, the college received over 60 photographs from students who have traveled all over the world through Northeastern’s study abroad, Dialogue of Civilizations, and international co-op programs. Below are the winners, as voted on by students, faculty, and staff. View this interactive map to explore just some of the places around the globe where CSSH students have gone to study, work, and research, as well as to view all of this year’s submissions.

First-Place Winner: Devin M. Cowick, International Affairs ’14

Beijing, China

StudyAbroad-Beijing(DevinCowick)1)      Where were you when they took the photo and tell us what the photo is of?

I took the photo during my Fall 2012 study abroad semester in Beijing, China. More specifically, I took the photo during a week-long field study trip in Tibetan provinces such as Gansu. At the time of the photo, my program was visiting Labrang Monastery, one of the most important Tibetan Buddhist monasteries. As you would imagine, there were many Buddhist monks going about their daily routines within and just outside the monastery. What I captured was one of the young monks in training having some fun riding a skate board while simultaneously eating an ice cream cone.

2)      Why did you select this photo to submit?

I decided to submit a photo from the field study trip because it was my favorite part of my study abroad experience. I thought the photo was noteworthy because it captured a side of monk life that contrasts with the typical image people have of monks. Monks don’t just meditate and pray all day, they like to have fun too!

3)      How have you grown both personally and intellectually from this global experience?

Through my study abroad experience in China I learned a new language, delved deeply into an unfamiliar culture, and saw my field of study from a new perspective. I also grew more confident in myself, pushed my adaptability skills to another level, and improved my ability to make friends with people who have different backgrounds and beliefs.

Second-Place Winner: Alec Selinger, International Affairs ’14

Bangkok, Thailand

StudyAbroad-Bangkok(AlecSelinger)

 

Third-Place Winner: Cody F. Adelson, International Affairs/Economics ’15

Bali, Indonesia

Dialogue-Bali(CodyAdelson)1)      Where were you when they took the photo and tell us what the photo is of?

Our group was in Ubud, Bali and as our Northeastern group was walking down the street, a little girl popped out of her house for a second to shyly observe who we were as foreigners and see what we were doing there.

2)      Why did you select this photo to submit?

I picked this photo because it was the best photo I took in terms of timing, she was only there for an instant and I was happy that I somehow caught that moment.

3)      How have you grown both personally and intellectually from this global experience?

Having a study abroad experience allowed me to both better understand the small but rich Balinese culture while at the same time finding out what they think about ours. It gave me the chance to step outside of the bubble that is the United States and see the world from a different perspective. I also met a lot of great friends, both Balinese and American and learned a lot about social entrepreneurship and what it has to offer.

Honorable Mention: Colleen R. Maney, Political Science/International Affairs ’14

Bali, Indonesia

Dialogue-Bali(ColleenManey)

Honorable Mention: Christina Reynolds, Political Science ’15

Japan

Dialogue-Japan(ChristinaReynolds)

1)      Where were you when you took the photo and tell us what the photo is of?

At the beginning of my Japan dialogue, we visited the base of Mount Fuji, which was fairly close by bus from the guest lake house of our host school, Meiji University. At the base of Mount Fuji there is a Shinto shrine. The photo is of Japanese wooden wishing plaques, called ema. Once a prayer or wish is written, the ema are left hanging at the shrine, where the kami (spirits or gods) receive them.

2)      Why did you select this photo to submit?

I chose this photo because it shows the presence of a Northeastern University student amongst people from all over the world. I like that there are many languages represented on the plaques and I feel my photo epitomizes how Northeastern extends its presence all over the globe through its dialogue of civilizations, study-abroad, and co-op programs. It is also a very positive photo, filled with messages of hope and love.

3)      How have you grown both personally and intellectually from this global experience?

As a result of participating in the Northeastern Japan political science dialogue, it furthered my interest in Japanese politics and culture and now I would like to work in Japan. I am currently on co-op with an NGO at the United Nations and I have been working closely with a Japanese NGO so I appreciate my experience and exposure to Japanese etiquette and society. I have grown immensely from the experience and plan to go on a photography dialogue again before I graduate.

Honorable Mention: Aline M. Beylerian, Economics ’17

Amman, Jordan

Dialogue-Jordan(AlineBeylerian)1)      Where were you when you took the photo and tell us what the photo is of?

I was in Wadi Rum, Jordan when I took the photo and it is of three of the camels and their shepherd that came to give us a ride just after sunrise, the morning after we slept in tents under wool blankets.

2)      Why did you select this photo to submit?

I selected this photo because I thought it depicted our time in Jordan and more specifically the time we spent in the desert. The first thing everyone asks when I tell them I studied in Jordan is, “did you get to ride a camel?”  The answer to that is yes, so I wanted to show that through this picture.  Also you can see in the picture that the shepherd is wearing a baseball cap.  That is globalization at it’s finest.

3)      How have you grown both personally and intellectually from this global experience?

Through this Dialogue of Civilizations to Jordan, I learned a lot about the Arabic language (Jordanian Dialect) and the Arab Spring and how it relates to Jordan. Being in Jordan for over a month allowed me to learn the culture and how people in the Middle East live. It was necessary to travel with an open mind and be aware of my surroundings, but I am sure this experience has helped me grow in ways I have not yet discovered.