The 2014 Model NATO Team

April 2014 Endnotes

Model NATO team (pictured above) shines at national competition.
April 16th, 2014

Prizes, Awards, Grants, and Fellowships:

Jessica Iocca, a political science and communication studies combined major currently studying abroad in Ghana, received the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship. The Gilman Scholarship is a competitive grant that provides U.S. undergraduate students the means to pursue global academic studies.

International affairs major Marcus Carroll received the Boren Scholarship, which will allow him to study in Japan. The scholarship provides undergraduates the resources to acquire skills and experiences in areas of the world critical to the future security of our nation. The Boren Scholarship requires that Carroll commit to seeking work in the federal government.

The Model NATO and Model Arab League teams, advised by Assistant Academic Specialist in Political Science Phil D’Agati, each recorded first-place finishes at their respective national competitions this spring. The Model African Union team, advised by Associate Professor of African American Studies Kwamina Panford, also participated in its national competition during which international affairs major Elikya Bokanga received a Leadership Award.

CSSH awarded five FY15 Tier 1 Grants for new and innovative research projects. Many of the multidisciplinary teams which secured Tier 1 funding are studying topics that address at least one of the university’s global research themes: Health, Security, Sustainability, and Big Data/Network Science.

Associate Professor of Sociology Berna Turam’s article “The Primacy of Space in Politics: Bargaining Rights, Freedom and Power in an Istanbul Neighborhood,” published in the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research (IJURR), received the publication’s Best Article Award. Turam’s article argues that “the urban neighborhood becomes central for political contestation when both government and opposition fail to protect and secure liberties and rights.”

Assistant Professor of African American Studies Richard Wamai and Northeastern’s Integrated Initiative for Global Health received a two-year, $100,000 grant from the IZUMI Foundation Board of Directors. The grant will be used to develop and implement cost-effective prevention interventions for neglected tropical diseases in East Pokot District, Kenya.

Professor of Political Science Bill Miles’ Jews of Nigeria: An Afro-Judaic Odyssey was named a National Jewish Book Award Finalist in the category of Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice.

Assistant Professor of English Mya Poe received the 2014 Conference on College Composition and Communication’s Outstanding Book Award for her co-edited book, Race and Writing Assessment. Published in 2012 by Peter Lang, the book shows how writing assessment can change to account for the increasing diversity of students in college classrooms today.

Assistant Professor of English Ryan Cordell’s article “‘Taken Possession of’: The Reprinting and Reauthorship of Hawthorne’s ‘Celestial Railroad’ in the Antebellum Religious Press,” published in Digital Humanities Quarterly, received the 2013 ProQuest/RSAP Award.

Sociology Ph.D. candidate Firuzeh Shokooh Valle received a Minority Fellowship Program pre-doctoral fellowship for 2014-15 from the American Sociological Association. Her research focuses on the use of social media by feminist groups in post-colonial conditions.

History Ph.D. candidate Abby Mullen and Associate Professor of History Heather Streets-Salter received an NEH grant to form a collaboration between NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks and the Society for Military History, and to host a two-day professional development workshop this summer on the application of digital humanities methodologies to military history.

Sociology Ph.D. student Yingchan Zhang won a Social Science Research Council pre-doctoral fellowship. She studies the role of return migration to Chinese cities, and the policies Chinese cities employ to recruit and utilize skilled immigrant labor in their plans for economic development.

History graduate student Akin Sefer received a fellowship from the American Research Center in Turkey to conduct dissertation research. His dissertation is on “Labor in the Heart of Empire: Workers, Industry and the State in the Ottoman Imperial Naval Arsenal, 1839-1876.”

English Ph.D. candidate Jim McGrath accepted a BARI (Boston Area Research Initiative) Urban Doctoral Student fellowship, funded by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University to work on Twitter data related to Our Marathon.

CSSH students Oceane Langreney, Colleen Maney and Annette Blystad participated in the Clinton Global Initiative University Conference 2014 in Phoenix last month. The invitation to attend came about because of a social enterprise project that the students created with Indonesian students while participating in the Global Corps Bali Dialogue led by Assistant Professor Denise Horn in the summer of 2013. Their project “Toya Wirasa” helps feed Balinese orphanages through selling water to other local institutions. Watch the video the students produced for more information on the project.

Northeastern University nominated human services major Christie Civetta, sociology major Kelly Ganon, and international affairs major Sam Manning for this year’s Harry S. Truman Scholarship. This prestigious scholarship is awarded to 75 outstanding students who have shown leadership and service in their campus and community, and who plan to pursue careers in public service.

 

Recent Publications:

Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion Jung Lee published The Ethical Foundations of Early Daoism: Zhuangzi’s Unique Moral Vision, in the Palgrave MacMillan series, Content and Context in Theological Ethics.

Professor of Sociology and Anthropology Alan Klein published Dominican Baseball: New Pride, Old Prejudice, with Temple University Press. In his fourth book on baseball in Latin America, Klein charts the history of Major League Baseball’s influence in the Dominican Republic.

Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Policy Thomas Vicino recently co-authored Global Migration: The Basics. Published by Routledge, the volume explores the causes and consequences of migration by examining economic and public policy, as well as demographic patterns.

Andrew Sum and the Center for Labor Market Studies staff co-authored a report that was funded and published by the Brookings Institution. The report, “The Plummeting Labor Market Fortunes of Teens and Young-Adults,” discusses the employment outlooks for teens and young adults, and offers strategies to reduce youth joblessness and workforce underutilization. The report received much media attention in publications such as Bloomberg Businessweek, The Boston Globe, and CNNMoney.

 


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