News

Barry Karger

Chemistry professor named to Power List

He has helped guide close to 200 students, postdoctoral researchers, and staff members, and now Dr. Barry Karger has been named to The Analytical Scientist’s POWER LIST.

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Petroleum, Fracking, and Geophysics – Crunching Digital Data

Matt Hall, @kwinkunks, is a geologist turned geophysicist with Agile*. He was the #sciencechat guest on Wednesday, October 16.

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Collaborating to fight diseases of the poor

Listen to chemistry professor Michael Pollastri talk about his work finding treatments for NTDs.

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Social insects put the ‘I’ in team to fight disease

Social insects such as ants, ter­mites, and some bees and wasps live in a sort of eternal “air­plane envi­ron­ment.”

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Diving right in, student researcher explores ocean habitats

During Nadia Aamoum’s six-​​month inter­na­tional co-​​op in the island nation of Sey­chelles, north of Mada­gascar, the ocean was her work­place.

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Researchers use science to predict success

Like the rest of the aca­d­emic com­mu­nity, physi­cists rely on var­ious quan­ti­ta­tive fac­tors to deter­mine whether a researcher will enjoy long-​​term suc­cess.

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Get the picture? New high-​​res images show brain activity like never before

In the middle of the human brain there is a tiny struc­ture shaped like an elon­gated donut that plays a cru­cial role in man­aging how the body func­tions.

Steven Scyphers

Managing shorelines, coastal fisheries, and expectations

Steven Scyphers, a post-doctoral researcher at Northeastern University’s Marine Science Center in Nahant, Mass. is researching how to better manage shorelines and coastal fisheries. He was a guest of #sciencechat on October 2, 2013.

neuroscience

Say it quickly – Nu Rho Psi

This fall, Northeastern University welcomes a new student organization – a chapter of Nu Rho Psi, the National Honor Society in Neuroscience.

Baruch Barzel

A kid in a network shop

There are some ques­tions that you don’t need to be a sci­en­tist to ask. You need to be a little kid.

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