Scientists and researchers. Educators and future doctors. These were the people behind NU Talk 2016, from the organizers to the presenters themselves. But the impacts and implementations that were presented do not just affect the scientific community. They are global, and they concern the future of society as a whole. The main idea of NU Talk 2016, which was January 28, 2016, was to voice student passions to a general audience – to make science more approachable in a world that is rapidly progressing along a scientific and technological route.

The speakers at NU Talk 2016 and the title of their talks were: Asama Lekbua, Behavioral Neuroscience, “Go with Your Gut: Microbiome and Mental Health”; Jordan Harris, Chemical Engineering, Jeremy Thong, Nursing, “Nanotechnology: Small Size, Big Potential”; Cayman Somerville, Environmental Science, “NUSci Explains Scientific Journalism”; Davis Sawyer, Chemistry, “Accidently Cured: How Randomness Affects Drug-making”; Troy Sutton, Energy Sustainability, Samuel Blehar, Entrepreneurship, “Sustainable Development for a Sustainable Future”; Luke Kyungmin Shin, Biology and Mathematics, “What is the Future of Oral Health for Native Americans?”; Ronan Talty, Behavioral Neuroscience, “Understanding the Neurobiology of Sex Differences in Fear and Anxiety”; Noa Golan, Behavioral Neuroscience, “Stress and the Developing Brain”; Kristian Teichert, Biochemistry, Samuel Kaplan, Biochemistry, “Rethinking STEM Education: New Approaches to Outreach”; Victoria Hoffman, Biochemistry, “Compassion for Animals Can Improve Our Health”; and Brent Kisby, Behavioral Neuroscience, “Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Drug Addicition: How Biochemistry Affects Behavior.”