How to Diversify a Resume

resume picMany job positions nowadays are multidisciplinary – calling for skills and traits from multiple backgrounds. If you are pursuing a seemingly narrow field like nursing or engineering, there are ways to make your resume stand out and grow to include other fields you may not have had any other way of tapping into.

1. Include varied volunteer experiences

Don’t think that short volunteer trips or one-time volunteer experiences don’t count! Spending your spring break in Nicaragua shows that service is important to you and you include it in your life whenever you can. If mentoring and teaching are skills you want to enhance talk about that time you helped at-risk teens with after-school tutoring. A volunteer position is just as valuable as a paid job and develops just as many skills. Treat them equally!

2. Don’t leave out any language skills

Even being conversational in a different language is an important addition to a resume. In healthcare, speaking different languages means interacting with more diverse patients. In the business world, a second language proficiency could mean an opportunity to work in a different branch abroad. Even if you’re just learning a language, mention that to showcase how well-rounded of an individual you are in your spare time. In an increasingly global shared economy, culture is a strength to employers.

3. Articulate your social media expertise

Are you active on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube? Write your own blog? Share that! More creative positions will embrace a strong online presence with the knowledge that you would be able to apply your know-how to their own brand. Translate your online self as a desirable and marketable professional.

4. Certifications show mastery in a specific skill

Do you have cool certifications in things like bartending, scuba diving or Photoshop? Include them in your resume! These are the cherries on top to show off the many colorful facets to your life. Who knows, that bartending license could do well in the restaurant and hospitality business, scuba diving could earn you an adventure of a lifetime working for an environmental non-profit, and Photoshop could get you that gig at the magazine of your dreams. A love of learning new skills and topics, can only do a candidate good.

5. Weave in your hobbies

Take advantage of the “interests” section in your resume. If you’re a yoga enthusiast or write poetry, don’t be afraid to share that. This is the space to connect with the interviewer and leave them with a positive last thought about you. When it comes down to it, we’re all humans with our own special interests and that’s what will make you memorable when compared with someone with the exact GPA and coursework and similar internships as you.

Angelica is a fourth-​​year nursing stu­dent with a minor in Eng­lish hailing from New Jersey. She has studied or worked in all the major Boston hos­pi­tals. Angelica is also a colum­nist for The Hunt­ington News and enjoys writing cre­ative non-​​fiction. 

Image Source: For College Students: Writing Your First Resume via LinkedIn

An Act of Translation: Turning an Academic CV into an Industry Resume

source: mediacommons.futureofthebook.org

source: mediacommons.futureofthebook.org

This guest post was written by Lana Cook, a PhD candidate in the English department at Northeastern University who finishing up her last semester and beginning to navigate the Alt-Ac track.

Translation (n.): The conversion of something from one form or medium into another.

Mixed feelings abound when entering any job market, but transitioning to a different career path or field can be downright intimidating.  Embarking on my own career search, I kept asking myself, can a PhD trained in the academic track of teaching and research move to a career in administration and nonprofit management?  Did I need to go back to school for a business degree?  I researched MBA programs for a quick minute before I realized that 1) I had plenty of education, and 2) I already had all the necessary skills and abilities.  I just had a problem of phrasing. I was too bound to my discipline’s jargon.  I needed to become a translator.

Any skilled translator would tell you that you need to immerse yourself in the foreign language to gain fluency.  In my alt-ac career search that meant researching arts organizations, nonprofits, foundations and research centers, taking special note of how they describe their missions and activities.  I followed community leaders on Twitter and subscribed to industry news.  I carefully read job postings and highlighted repeated key terms. I learned that in administrative-speak “development” meant fundraising, “outreach” meant marketing, “coordinator” meant collaboration. I began to see my graduate work through the perspective of project management. The dissertation, conferences, teaching, and tutoring taught me to how to prioritize multiple high stakes projects and negotiate diverse stakeholders. Graduate school required me to develop organizational systems that efficiently managed logistics and achieved identifiable outcomes.  Revising an academic curriculum vitae (CV) into a resume involved using a new industry language, reframing my experience in terms that would resonate with my audience of potential employers.

Step one was translating my experiences into industry jargon. The next step was revamping my bloated multipage CV that listed all my conferences, publications, courses taken and taught, into a compact, easy to digest, professional resume.  I recommend the following steps for transforming a CV into a resume:

  • Identify your transferrable skills.  Interpersonal communication, organization, following instructions and anticipating needs: these are transferrable skills that are applicable in every career. There are several resources where you can mine language for identifying your personal aptitudes and describing them in professional terms.
  • Condense your history. While an academic CV can be several pages long, resumes are typically one page (two if you have extensive experience).  For graduate students fresh on the job market, keep your resume to one page, focusing on experiences and skills that are most relevant to the desired position.
  • Tailor your resume and cover letter specifically to the position and organization.  Create a long master resume that lists all your experiences, education, every seminar, class, conference, and project you worked on (start this while you are in school so you can keep track of your accomplishments).  Use the master copy to take sections from when tailoring a resume to a specific position.   While cover letter templates can help save time, they can quickly become formulaic. One size does not fit all in today’s job market. Pay attention and respond to the minute details of the job post, echoing the language the employers use and aligning your experience with their needs.
  • Add new skills to your resume.  Many of the positions I was interested in asked for proficiency with administrative software.   Northeastern provides several free options for technology crash courses.  Information Technology Services (ITS) offers one-day courses in the Snell Library classrooms for hands-on help or you can follow online tutorials through Lynda.  I recently took refresher courses in Excel database management and Photoshop, as well as a 4-hour introductory course to HTML.
  • Use your network to workshop your resume.  Identify a professional working in your desired career and ask for an informational interview.  Use the meeting to gain industry knowledge and learn about the career paths people have taken to get there.  Follow up by asking if they could give you some advice on your resume. Visit Career Development and work with a career advisor to refine your job materials.

Translating my resume has given me a confidence boost. I now look at job postings and see open possibilities where before I saw closed doors.  Resources for alternative academics (Alt-Ac) are growing as more PhDs turn to options beyond teaching.  GradHacker dedicated last week’s posts to Alt-Ac, including how to get started on the job search. Follow the hashtag #altac on Twitter to learn more.  Join me on the first Thursday of every month here on the Works as I countdown to graduation.

Lana Cook is a PhD candidate in the English department at Northeastern University. Her dissertation traces the development of the psychedelic aesthetic in mid-twentieth century American literature and film. Lana is a 2013-2014 graduate fellow at the Humanities Center.  She received her bachelors of arts at the University of New Hampshire.  You can follow her on Twitter @lanacook or Linkedin.

How to land the job of your dreams– or at least be considered

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This guest post was written by Caroline DeBauche, a People Operations Partner at Ping Identity Corporation.

Recognized by Forbes Magazine in 2013 as one of America’s Most Promising Companies, Ping is on the hiring fast track. The talent acquisition team at Ping reviews thousands of applications and interviews hundreds of candidates for only a few positions. So how can you stand out to successful companies who are looking for the best of the best?

1. Create a great resume.  

  • Use spell check! This may seem obvious but you’d be surprised at how many people have misspelled words on their resume.
  • Have at least one other person review your resume. Ask for his/her initial reaction and make improvements.
  • Put relevant information first- it’s okay if that’s your education. Your major is more important to recruiters than your babysitting or lawn care job.
  • Choose your words wisely. Use powerful action verbs to get to the point as recruiters usually only spend seconds reviewing a resume.

2. Be prepared for the phone interview. When you get called for an interview, make sure to get all the details.

  • Ask who you will be interviewing with, request their jobs and titles, and determine who will be making the hiring decision.
  • Research, research, research! Start with the company website but don’t end there. Search for recent news, LinkedIn, Glassdoor.com. During your research, write down specific questions about what you found. This will show you did your homework and will set you apart!

3. Nail the onsite interview.

  • Show up 5 minutes early, but no earlier! If you arrive earlier, you put pressure on the interviewer to move up their schedule.
  • Write down the names and titles of everyone you interview with.
  • Focus on what you can do for the organization, not what they can do for you.
  • When answering questions, use specific examples from previous jobs or group class projects.
  • If you don’t know the answer or something or don’t have the experience, be honest. Then let them know you’d be eager to learn.
  • Ask great questions (see below for two examples).

TWO MAGIC QUESTIONS

  1. What can I do in the first 60 days of my employment with your company that would make the biggest impact to the team?
  2. What concerns do you have about my background, that you think would prevent me for doing this job?

Remember to be prepared, be persistent and be passionate! 

Over 900 companies, including 45 of the Fortune 100, rely on Ping Identity’s award-winning products to make the digital world a better experience for hundreds of millions of people. Ping’s own Gary Derkacz will share his personal experiences crafting solutions that millions of people use each day.

Come learn how Ping Identity protects identity, defends privacy and secures the Internet and provides custom solutions for WalMart, Bank of America, BMW and hundreds of other big-name customers. Register for the NU Tech Talk Tue. 11/19 6:00PM-7:00PM by clicking HERE and/or tweet Ping Identity at @PingIdentity.