I’m moving to LA! Advice on Conducting a Long Distance Job Search

imagesource: moveacrosscountry.net

imagesource: moveacrosscountry.net

This post was written by Angela Vallillo, recent biology graduate on the pre-medical track. She is moving to LA in less than a week!

Hello again! I’m glad to be contributing to the blog for a second time. I thought I’d share some updates about my post-grad, job-searching, apartment hunting life. I graduated on May 2, but I don’t technically finish with my degree until August. Until then, I’m taking some classes online. But, I’m also in the process of moving to Los Angeles! My boyfriend and I have been in a long distance relationship for over two and a half years, and this was the perfect opportunity for us to finally be together. My flight is in the afternoon on June 5th, and I couldn’t be more excited to check out another city! This whole relocation thing has had a lot of moving parts, so take note!

Apartment searching: As of about thirty minutes ago, I am all locked in for an apartment. I thought I had one last week, but some things did not work out and everything seemed as if the whole move was falling apart. I’m looking in the Koreatown area of Los Angeles, which is right outside of downtown. It’s a cool area that is close to all the sights and restaurants downtown. It was a bit weird conducting searches over the phone and explaining my situation to landlords and property managers, but most of the time they were pretty cool about it. It also helps that my boyfriend is already there and he can go check buildings and apartments out before I get there. FaceTime has been really handy, he would go check out apartments and then FaceTime me so I could actually see it in real time. Right now I’m in the process of signing a lease over the internet, and thanks to technology, I’m able to do it over e-sign, which is great! Once I send a deposit and sign the lease, the apartment will be all mine when I step off the plane on June 5th. 

Job Hunting: So, I made a promise to myself that I wouldn’t be moving without a job. Well, that quickly went out the window as I hadn’t been having a lot of luck with companies wanting to hire me from out of town. If you’re looking to move, I wouldn’t take this as an “end all” statement because people have definitely done it. I’ve been doing a lot of searching on Craigslist for medical positions. When I send out replies to ads, I definitely don’t hide the fact that I am out of town. I explain in the body of my email and cover letter, in a basic and easy to understand few sentences exactly what my plan is and what I’m doing. I also explicitly say that I would love to phone or Skype interview if the company wants to interview me before I get there. Some have been receptive, while others, I assume, have gone with people that are in the area. I did get a few calls back, and a Skype interview with an orthopedic surgeon! Most of the time, they will want to meet you in person, and I will be heading to the office the day after my plane lands in order to formally interview. It definitely depends what field you’re looking for a job in order to figure out what kind of companies you’re dealing with.

General Moving Advice: So to throw another curveball into my moving plans, I also have a cat. This has limited which apartments that I am able to even look at. I also have to bring her on the plane with me, which is going to be an adventure within itself. I plan on bringing one large bag, and mailing the rest of my things. Since the apartment isn’t furnished, that’s another thing that I have to do. Starting with the necessities and moving on from there. If anybody has any advice about sending or moving stuff, definitely let me know, I’m always open to suggestions- just leave it in the comments!

It’s hard leaving a place you’ve grown to love and lived in for so long, but graduating is all about new opportunities and new adventures! Wish me luck!

Angela Vallillo is recent biology major on the pre-medical track. She is in the midst of moving cross country to LA. Follow her NU admissions blog to read more from Angela.

 

How To Find a Co-op While You’re Abroad

LindseyEdinburgh

This article was written by Lindsey Sampson, a 3rd year international affairs student at NU as a regular student contributor for The Works.

Northeastern students are everywhere. Because of the number of international opportunities available, it’s not uncommon for a student to apply for co-op 3,000 miles away from Boston. I applied for my second co-op from my living room in Edinburgh, Scotland, where I studied abroad in the fall. While applying for co-op abroad presents its own unique set of challenges, you should not feel overwhelmed – it is possible to find a co-op you love while studying abroad as long as you are well-prepared.

Find a quiet place with reliable wi-fi. Generally speaking, study abroad housing is not known for its reliable wi-fi. Find another place on campus that is quiet and has excellent wi-fi. Sometimes the library has small rooms available to reserve, or you can ask a professor to use his or her office. While co-op interviewers are understanding of external circumstances, a Skype call inhibited by a slow internet connection is not the best way to make a good impression.

Be on call. You’re studying abroad, so evenings and weekends will probably be spent on grand adventures around your host country. However, because you are so far away, you need to be vigilant about checking your email every time you have wi-fi, especially during co-op crunch time. If you’re on the road, stop somewhere with reliable wi-fi at least once a day. Pro tip: Starbucks always has good wi-fi. Always. Make sure you are available during working hours stateside and make a good first impression by responding to emails quickly.

Be proactive. When a potential employer offers you an interview, make sure they have all of the materials they need to assess you as a candidate. Because you won’t be in the same room with them, geared up with extra copies of your resume and references, be sure to have them virtually on-hand; either keep important co-op application documents on your desktop or send them to your interviewers beforehand.

Remember, at the end of the day, that you are qualified. Co-op employers are interested in you as a candidate — what you are doing and where you are going. One interviewer gave me suggestions for restaurants in Edinburgh. Some employers are wary about hiring a co-op student they have not met in-person, but attentiveness and preparedness can ease their mind and earn you one amazing co-op.

Lindsey Sampson is a middler International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and tweet her @lindseygsampson.

Tips for the International Job Search from the International Guru

photo from http://www.visassimply.com/work-abroad

photo from http://www.visassimply.com/work-abroad

This guest post was written by Ellen Zold Goldman, Associate Director of Career Development and lover of all things international.

It’s officially International Month on the blog and a great time to think about escaping our snowy winter weather. If you have the travel bug, maybe working overseas is in your future. Check out these tips for creating your own work abroad experience in this first blog post focused on international topics.

Tips for the International Job Search

  • Learn about cultures you’re interested in. Don’t spend lots of time finding a job in a place you can’t warm up to…Develop friendships with international students. Make sure you like the sound of the language and the food.  A great resource is Transitions Abroad’s Living Abroad section.
  • Join Global Jobs Network, Expat & Global Worker, and other groups on LinkedIn. Join groups related both to your career interests and countries you’re interested in working. Follow the weekly digest and reach out to folks whose discussions interest to you.
  • Check out overseas Fellowships: That’s money you don’t have to pay back which underwrites your experience.
  • Use Going Global, by logging into Husky Career Link for great resources.
  • Network, Network, Network! With your co-op employers, your international student friend’s uncle, hair dresser, professors, Study Abroad adviser… with ANYONE who will listen to you. While you’re on co-op,  see if they have a location in a city you’re interested in. Remember speaking the language enables you to function professionally.
  • Join list-servs like Dev-X. List-servs are usually related to professional associations. It’s where they get the word out about jobs.
  • Considering Teaching Abroad? Check out the JET (Japan) program, CIEE, Search Associates, and Dave’s ESL Café, but buyer beware. Do your research to find a credible program.
  • The Peace Corps, may be a great option for you. We have the most amazing Peace Corps Employer-in-Residence. Make an appointment with her and stay tuned for her blog.
  • Connect with panelists at our events. Career Development has a program called Build an International Career on March 27th and Global Careers Forum in the fall. Network with the folks on the panel.
  • Consider going from local to international—work here first and get selected for an international assignment or transferred overseas.  Case in point: My friend worked in Kenya with International Rescue Committee after working for them in Boston. Another friend’s starting the finance department at his company’s new international location. Also check out Foreign Firms Operating in the U.S. through the library or amazon.com.
  • Go on an International Co-op, study abroad, or a dialogue. While you’re there do information interviews. I’ve done a lot of info interviews and usually folks love to share their advice. Remember- the ASK is NOT for a job, just for advice. Do your research ahead of time and know what you want to ask.
  • Many companies have joint ventures with local companies overseas. Some Consulates/Embassies have the list in their business section.
  • Go overseas to your target country for a vacation or visit and check out some of the “Meet Ups” (always go to public places—now I feel like I’m channeling my Mom). Connect with others while you’re there and network. Check out American Firms Operating in Foreign Countries through www.uniworldbp.com or through the library.  If you have a work permit, or EEU citizenship, you can always sign up to temp…but know it’s really hard. It’s a job to get a job, and even more so in another country—especially if you’re not a native speaker. Our international students here at Northeastern understand that very well as they’re going through it themselves in the US.
  • Check out the Advanced People Search on LinkedIn.com. You can type in Northeastern University for the school, click on your target country, and find alum overseas, or do info interviews with NU alum who have worked in your target country but who are in the Boston area.
  • Here are some additional sites. Just remember that while being on line can feel efficient, it’s rarely effective without networking. There are meta sites- like Monster with their world-wide gateway and local sites that specialize in specific countries. Remember to use your Northeastern Network, Husky Nation, and Husky Career Link. Check out: Riley Guide, Overseas Digest, 4 International Careers & Jobs, and InternationalJobs.com. There are also professionally-focused sites that offer jobs internationally, themed by type of position; for example: Econ-Jobs.com, and others.

Want to learn more?  Make an appointment with Career Development! Be sure to check out our International Job Guide. Also check out this article How to FInd Your First Paid Job Overseas.

Ellen Zold Goldman is Associate Director at Career Development. She’s worked on a short-term gig at a non-profit in Greece, has coordinated an international co-op exchange program in Australia, directed study abroad at another university, loves international students, and as you can probably tell, she has a passion for anything international.