Interviewing With Confidence

Interview-tips-10Mark Twain once said, “To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence.” Here’s how I would apply this to job seeking: Be ignorant of the paralyzing fear and contrived impossibilities that will prevent you from achieving your goals, and run toward your dreams with total confidence that you will succeed.

These are words to live by when it comes to interviewing. Your interviewer has a limited amount of time to get a feel for whether you have the skills and drive to succeed in their organization. So, your job is to confidently prove to them you do. Confidence by its very nature implies competence, and that’s the message you want to send the interviewer.

Here are several ways you can demonstrate confidence during an interview:

  1. Come prepared to share a few insights about the company that align with your career objectives and ideals. Preparation will instill a sense of confidence in you that is authentic!
  2. Dress the part. Your interviewer should be able to look at you and think, this person not only looks capable, he or she looks like they already fit in our organization.
  3. Shake hands with poise and sincerity. While you may feel like a bag of nerves on the inside, your interviewer doesn’t have to know it. A firm handshake will convey confidence.
  4. Maintain good eye contact with your interviewer, especially when answering questions. This displays confidence in what you are saying.
  5. Keep your body language in check. Don’t fidget, slouch, lean back or stiffen up. A relaxed, upright posture portrays confidence.
  6. Speak with enthusiasm and interest. If you tend to quiver or go monotone when you are nervous, this is an area you will need to practice. How you say what you say is important!

Confidence will take you a long way in your career—but it must start with the interview!

Ashleane is a third year Communications major from Miami, FL. She enjoys ballet dancing , exploring the sights and sounds of Boston, and literature. Check her out onTumblr!

Answering the Important Job Interview Questions NOT Asked

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Part of the stress that comes with a job interview is the knowledge that the hiring manager has a list of questions she may ask, and you don’t always know what’s on the list.

Sometimes, however, as you strive to highlight the skills and accomplishments that make you stand out as a candidate, you might find that there are a few questions that did not get asked.

Should you give up and play it safe by only answering what you’re asked? Definitely not! An interview is an exchange of ideas and inquiry into your fit, so it’s well within interview etiquette to take the conversation where it needs to go.

If you struggle to make sure every interview highlights your strengths, here are a few ideas for structuring your interview to answer those unasked, yet vitally important, questions:

Identify the Questions Likely to be Asked

Make a list of questions you know the interviewer is likely to ask. You can do this by performing a web search such as “[Job Title] + Interview questions” or referring to your notes from past interviews to see which questions came up.

For example, if you are interviewing for a copy writing position, you may receive questions about what you write, how often you write, what you’re reading and how you stay creative or energized throughout the day.

Identify the Questions you Need to Answer

Review your resume and cover letter and consider your job history. Which significant moments, concepts and accomplishments are important to bring up in the interview?

For example, as you interview for the copy writing position you’ll want to highlight moments in your career when your work was particularly well received by a previous employer.

Identify Overlaps in the Lists

Compare the lists to each other and see if there are any obvious connections. If your interviewer is likely to ask “Tell me about the most recent book you’ve read,” prepare an answer that links your most recent reading to an accomplishment at work.

Use Unasked Questions as Questions You Ask

If you still have unasked questions, consider whether or not you can rephrase or include them as questions for your employer.

The job interview represents a significant opportunity for you to present your skills, accomplishments and unique fit for the working environment. It’s not likely that you can fit all of that into the pre-chosen questions of the average interviewer. Add an edge to your interview by planning and answering the unasked questions in a way that continues the conversation and highlights your abilities for the hiring manager.

Ashleane Alabre is a third year communication studies major from Miami, Fl. When not in class, Ashelane enjoys ballet dancing, sightseeing, and literature. Keep up with Ashleane on her Tumblr.

Completing Your Senior Checklist

CHECKLISTYou’re a senior? When did that happen?! Time sure does fly. It’s scary to think this year is going to be over before you know it.  Take advantage of the time you have left! Spend time with your friends, create a bucket list, do all the fun things this great city has to offer…but prepare for what comes next!  Here are some tips to keep in mind as you get ready for the professional life that lies ahead:

6) Start with research, and then create a job search strategy for yourself:

Research the industry and company you want to be in and target your search around these companies. Consider what you like about the company, but also contemplate average salaries, cost of living, and other costs you might be incurring.  Utilize NUcareers, online job boards, company websites, and your network!

5) Prepare early:

Update your resume, reach out to references, and practice on Big Interview.

4) Network:

Utilize LinkedIn, Husky Nation, and go on informational interviews. Set yourself up so that you have people willing to advocate for you come application time.

3) Stay organized:

I am a big fan of spreadsheets…but do what works best for you…that might be a journal, a color-coded calendar, or maybe Google Docs.  Keep track of important dates like when an employer is going to be on campus, when an application is due, when you need to follow up, and who in your network might be a good point of contact.

2) Take advantage of all the student discounts while you still can:

Professional organizations offer some great student discounts.  It is very affordable for students to join as a member, and attend conferences.  It’s the last chance you’ll get for these great prices…but what’s even better are the networking opportunities that will come out of this.  Be a part of the conversations on ‘hot topics’ your industry is talking about.

…also make sure you get your fair share of discounts for restaurants, retail, technology, and entertainment.

1) Visit Career Development!

We have a network of employers that are eager to recruit seniors like YOU! Take advantage of information sessions, panel discussions, and interviews that happen right here on campus. Go to events, workshops and walk-in appointments. Attend the Senior Career Conference on 1/22 and the Career Fair on 2/4 – both great opportunities to learn and network with employers. Still unsure about what to do? Schedule a 1-on-1 advising session with a career advisor! We are here to help!

Emily Norris is a Career Advisor at Northeastern Career Development. She loves working with students and guiding them to make informed career decisions that will lead to personal happiness.  She enjoys hiking and a good workout, but also loves cooking and baking for friends and family to ensure a healthy balance! Tweet her @CareerCoachNU