Beating the First Day Jitters: 5 Simple Steps to Overcoming Anxiety

anxiety ecardIn my experience, starting a new job is rarely anything short of nerve wracking and overwhelming. Getting acclimated to a new environment is difficult and it’s hard to prepare yourself for such a transition, since it’s nearly impossible to know what to expect from your new job. Personally, leading up to my most recent first day of work, I was a mess. My confidence level waned as my uncertainty increased, and I was preoccupied with the thought that my arrival at the office would be a disaster. Somehow, I managed to pull myself together just in time, using these five tips, and rocked my first day on the job. Here’s how you can too:

  1.    Plan Ahead

Since much of your first day is likely to be a mystery until you get to the office, make a plan for the parts of the day that are in your hands. Set an alarm so that you have enough time to really wake up before you head out. Designate the amount of time you need to get ready, and decide exactly when you want to leave. Make sure that you give yourself ample time for your commute so that you’re not rushing to make it on time. Laying out plans ahead of time will give you the sense that more of your day is in your control.

  1.    Do Your Research

To prepare for an interview, it’s important to familiarize yourself with a company and what they do. Why not do the same for your first day? Even if you conducted previous research, look up your organization, your superiors and co-workers, and your own job description to refresh yourself before you arrive. Aside from looking at information concerning the company and the role that you will be playing in the workplace, make sure that you double check where your office is, the best way to get there, and roughly how long it will take you to get there. It can only help you!

  1.    Pump Yourself Up

Remember, starting a new job can be daunting, but it is also an amazing opportunity for growth and improvement. You will get so much out of this experience, and even if it ends up straying from your expectations, the skills that you will develop and refine will be an incredibly valuable asset to you in the future. Get excited to learn and get your hands dirty with something new!

  1.    Then Calm Yourself Down

Whether you’re excited to the point of shaking or you’re just plain nervous, chances are that you’ll need to take a step back and center yourself. Take some deep breaths, listen to music, stretch, take a hot shower, or sit down with a nice cup of coffee or tea before you head over. Your body and your brain will thank you for taking care of them later.

  1.    Fake It ‘Til You Make It

If all else fails and you’re still feeling the nerves, feign confidence. Even if you’re not completely convinced, walk into your office and give your co-workers the first impression that you are ready to take on the world. Being at ease in a new environment takes time, but acting comfortable will help you settle into your niche much faster than allowing yourself to be nervous would.

Joining a new office is a very intimidating experience, but don’t worry, if I can survive it, you can too. Now, follow these steps, get out there, and show them who’s boss!

Rosie Kay is a sophomore at Northeastern majoring in Communication Studies and minoring in Business Administration. She is currently on her first co-op at the Governor’s Press Office at the Massachusetts State House. This past summer, she completed a dialogue in London where she explored two of her interests: English history culture and documentary filmmaking. Email her at kay.r@husky.neu.edu with questions or comments.

First Impressions: Make the Most of your First Week

Looking good? Check. source: blogs.fit.edu

Looking good? Check.
source: blogs.fit.edu

This article was written by Lindsey Sampson, a 3rd year international affairs student at NU as a regular student contributor for The Works. Follow her blog here and/or tweet her @lindseygsampson

The beginning of co-op is upon us, which means it’s time for new introductions. Your first week is going to be overwhelming; you will meet too many people, learn all about your new responsibilities, and you will feel like it can’t possibly only be 10am. Don’t worry – you got this. Here are a few tips to make the most of your first week.

Never eat alone: This is the time to introduce yourself. Get lunch with your department or go on a coffee run with the nice lady you just met from marketing—meet everyone you can. Your job will be much more enjoyable once you make some friends, so why put it off?

Don’t walk in like you own the place: During your first week, air on the side of saying less rather than saying too much. You will provide a fresh set of eyes for looking at systems and processes. Your suggestions will be valuable, but store up some ideas and save them for when you have a better idea of how the company works.

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Don’t call your boss Mary when her name is Kate: A magical amnesia wave washes over me during introductions. I am so focused on shaking hands and telling the other person my name that I completely forget to pay attention to their name. Immediately after they tell me, I have already long forgotten. Save yourself the embarrassment by paying attention during introductions. During your first week, avoid using the phrase, “I’m not good with names.” No one is good with names. The only way to get good at names is by consciously focusing during introductions. Sometimes you’ll blow it, but hey, it’s the first week.

Meet with your boss: Or better yet, your boss’s boss. Take time your first week to discuss the company’s goals and how you fit within the larger goals of the company. Knowing not only your responsibilities, but the responsibilities of those above will allow you to go above and beyond from the beginning in a noticeable and productive way. This puts you in a great position for a raise down the road (but let’s not get ahead of ourselves).

Most of all, don’t worry. Your first week and the many first impressions will be intimidating, but you will get used to everything and you will learn your co-worker’s name and, with no warning at all, you will get to your desk one morning and realize you’re thriving. It’s co-op season, so let’s make it happen.

Lindsey Sampson is a middler International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and/or tweet her @lindseygsampson.