Beyond the Green Line Series: A Taste of Chicago


chicago_architecture_river_cruise_Welcome Back to the Beyond the Green Line blog series which will focus on highlighting a particular metropolitan region outside of Boston as a potential area where Northeastern students may want to work and live after graduating. We’ll serve you up some tidbits on the local food scene, cultural attractions, and fun things to do as well as industries with a strong presence there and potential job openings so that you can consider adding these locales to your job search.   After each blog, feel free to leave us a comment if there’s anything you think we’ve missed or any particular companies in that area which interest you.

Welcome to our Beyond the Green Line blog on Chi-town. Did you know that there are 34 Fortune 500 companies located in Illinois, a majority of which are situated in the Chicago Metropolitan area?

You may have heard of a few of them before Boeing; Motorola; Linkedin and Kraft Foods, but did you also know that 18 Northeastern Students co-op’ed in Chicago in 2015 alone? Some co-op employers local to Chi-town include Google; UBS; Bluewolf; Intel; and Synapse Games. Want to know why students went there? Maybe because Chicago has it going on – check out this video by Chicago Creative Space touring Motorola’s new innovative Chicago headquarters and read below for the full scoop on the Windy City. Leave us a comment if there’s anything you think we’ve missed or any particular companies you’re interested in.

Food and Drink

  • Taste of Chicago – the WORLD’s LARGEST food festival which spans 5 days, attracts over a million visitors each year and has 2 stages which have hosted Wilco, Neyo, Trisha Yearwood and more.
  • Deep Dish pizza, hot dogs, and Italian beef – the lists of restaurants you MUST VISIT are overwhelming…


  • You may have heard of a couple actors/comedians who’ve gotten their start at Second City Improv – Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Stephen Colbert- the city is bursting with humor and creativity to take advantage of.
  • They dye the river green. Yup, every St. Paddy’s Day for the past 40+ years. Oh, and there’s a pretty amazing parade and celebration too.
  • If theater is your thing, the iconic Chicago Theater brings some big productions into town; for music, outdoor concerts at Millennium Park are great and smaller spots like Reggie’s Rock Club and the House of Blues offer a more intimate venue.
  • Everything from fossils at the Field Museum to Fine Arts at the Art Institute of Chicago –the 2nd largest museum in the U.S.


  • Architecture Boat Tour. A MUST DO. Enough said.
  • Not sure if you’ve heard of the Chicago Bulls or Blackhawks or White Sox or Cubs or da Bears their Sports – Chicago’s got your back for all things sports.
  • Lakefront Trail is amazing for running or cycling and don’t forget the beach for lounging too.

Chicago Job Opportunities – log into NUcareers to apply!

Yello Ruby Engineer; Data Scientist Co-op; Software Engineering Co-op

Uber Marketing Manager, Community Engagement; Regional Operations Manager

Groupon Talent Development Coordinator; Corporate Accounting Analyst; Data Engineer; Associate Buyer; Software Dev. Engineering Intern, Summer 2017

Kraft Heinz Corporate Management Trainee;  IT Analyst – Sales; Junior Buyer, Indirects

Rise Interactive Front End Developer, Analytics; Account Executive

LinkedIn SMB Associate Account Executive; Campaign Manager, Marketing Solutions;

Motorola Mobile App Developer; N.A. Marketing Intern; Portfolio Strategy Intern; Proposal Specialist Intern

GoGo Inflight Commercial Aviation – Project Controls Analyst; Analyst-Commercial Analytics

DigitasLBi Analyst, Search Marketing; Quality Analyst

Yelp Account Executive, Digital Advertising; Ad Operations Associate

This post was authored by Melissa Croteau. Melissa is an Assistant Director of Employer Relations at Northeastern University where she focuses on initiating new and broadening existing employer relationships with a goal of increased full-time, internship and co-op hiring of students as well as greater employer engagement within the broader Northeastern community.  She just celebrated 5 years of working at Northeastern where she also earned her Master’s in Higher Education Administration in 2013.  When she’s not chatting up employers, she enjoys singing in a 100-person choral group, hiking, and exploring the MFA.  You can reach Melissa at 


The Pros and Cons of Living WAY Off Campus

With room and board being ridiculously high in the city, some students turn to alternative living situations. Thinking of living WAY off campus? Here are some pros and cons I’ve gleaned from living in a small suburb in Malden, Massachusetts.

Let’s start with the cons (we’ll save the best for last!)

backpack2THE COMMUTE
The commute is by far one of the toughest parts about living far off campus, especially when the Boston snowpocalypse descends upon our helpless souls. Every morning and evening, I travel 40 minutes to and from school and occasionally endure the hellish 7-8 rush hour on the T. And no one is a happy camper on the T when it becomes a stuffed sausage in which no one wants to make room for the person next to them.

One convenient thing about living on or close to campus is being able to collapse on your bed in the middle of the day. I mean, I guess you could find an unoccupied couch in the library. And if you forgot your class materials back at home, better come up with a GREAT excuse as to why you’ve come to class empty-handed!

While living on campus allows one to take only what you need to a certain class before returning to your room to pick up the necessities for a later class, living way off campus means having to take everything you need in a day, packing it on your back like a mule, and hiking to every class with a lunchbox, laptop, and notes. On the upside, it’s trained me to think “light” and take only what is absolutely necessary. Last year, I left my laptop at home and got used to using the computers in the library. May sound ludicrous, but it helped me focus better in class when I couldn’t get on Facebook as “wah-wah, wah-wah-wah,” started coming from my professor’s mouth.

When you can’t walk over to a girlfriend’s room or classmate’s dorm at 12am for a little fun time or a class project because you’ve already gone home for the night, it’s hard to have that 24/7 access to campus social life.

If mum and dad can’t help out, and you didn’t hone in on your saving and budgeting skills over summer break, paying for rent out of pocket can be a pain and a pressure. $650 a month means cutting costs for most college students. It means rarely ever going out to eat or shopping in order to afford the monthly payments, and working all year round to make sure rent is always covered.

While that may sound rough, here are the reasons why I LOVE living WAY off campus!

Woman with coins in jar

The best thing about living off campus, is, of course, the affordability. While living on campus in the cheapest dorms can be up to $3,100 per semester, some of the cheaper living situations off campus can be up to $2,600 a semester with the internet, water, electricity, and laundry included. For example, my current rent is approx. $650 a month with all expenses included. It helps me sleep better at night to know that at least room and board aren’t being added to my college debt!

One of the struggles of living in a campus dorm is loud neighbors and the hubbub of noisy city life. For someone who doesn’t really enjoy having neighbors who constantly invite people over, play loud music, or simply have people living around them who seem to be unidentified zoo animals, the quietude of a small suburb and mature and respectful housemates can be a godsend.

Many graduate students or mature young adults live in rentable rooms out in Boston suburbia and commute thirty minutes or more to work or class. One plus of living off campus is feeling like a legit grown-up instead of the “waking-up-5-minutes-before-class-and-skipping face-washing-or-teeth-brushing” routine. In order to get to class on time, being on top of time management is essential. Great practice for the dreaded ADULTHOOD!

Living off campus, I’ve met graduate students and interns from all over the world–from an Austrian archaeologist to a Venezuelan lawyer. I’ve also befriended the neighborhood mom-and-pop hair stylists who trim my hair for $10. Pretty good deal on a haircut if you ask me!

For some busy students (or anti-fitness individuals), walking is the only exercise worked into their schedule. Walking to the T stop every morning and night are sure to have your calves walk-marathon ready.

Having a semester T pass is a must when commuting on the daily. While the price for a semester T pass is high (and also un-refundable if you lose it), having a T pass is like having the FastPass at Disney World. Worrying about refilling your charlie card is a forgotten misery while your friends struggle on the other side of the gate to recharge their cards!

Despite all the difficulties of living out of the way, I love living off campus and would recommend it to anyone looking for comfortable and cheaper rooming options!

This Blog was written by Laura Ma.  She is currently a third year English Major and ex-Architecture Major. She has an assortment of passions including working the drive-thru window at Taco Bell, learning to speak German, and dancing solo in her basement. Feel free to reach out to her at


The Four People You Meet in Foreign Countries

International Travel

Throughout my time in Uganda and in other travels, I’ve come across many foreigners that I’ve been able to fit into one or two of five categories in my head. This is by no means a complete or all-encompassing list, but a very generalized set of characters that I frequently meet abroad.

The hopeful. This person is the one that is most likely to stay long-term. They enjoy their lifestyle, and they find meaning in their work that gives them a reason to hang around and stay motivated. They are hopeful for the future of the country and believe they are making a difference. This person is great to know, as they are most familiar with the local culture and can give you insight and advice for your time in the country.

The cynic. Hearing this person speak makes you wonder why they are still here. They hate the food, the people, the work. They usually don’t last long, and if they are put here on an assignment, they will complain the entire time until they leave. The cynic isn’t the most fun person to be around, but it can sometimes be amusing to see a person struggle in challenging situations (see Paris Hilton working on a ranch in The Simple Life). Even the optimist has bad days, and the cynic is a nice companion on those days when you need someone to whine with.

The partier. Plenty of fresh-out-of-college, low budget young adults go to developing countries in search for the wild experience of a lifetime in a secluded part of the world. They are usually non-communicative or un-contactable, causing their parents relentless worry and fear for the worst. They’re fun nightlife people, and have plenty of great stories to tell about crazy situations they’ve encountered.

The wanderer. This may be the lone traveler, or the backpacking couple that is making its way across a country or continent. They take comfort in not having a tight schedule or work obligations, and are taking advantage of a period in life where they can take an extended period of time to see the world and experience a part of the world that they know nothing about. You’ll probably meet this person only once, but with some communication and planning you might be able to see them again on a random trip in another country.

When you travel, you meet a lot of interesting people. It’s important to be open-minded and, contrary to the traditional advice, willing to talk to strangers. You never know what you could learn by simply starting a conversation on a bus or in a restaurant. As my time in Uganda is coming to an end, I can say that one of the best things about being here has been meeting the range of characters, both local people and foreigners. I’ve met a Russian wedding dress designer, a kindergarten teacher, several Peace Corps volunteers, a lone traveler making her way down the east coast of Africa, a Spanish salsa instructor, a missionary working in the nomadic Karamoja, a Canadian couple running a primary school, and a Ugandan man trying to establish a turkey farm.

Mika White is a second year biochemistry major at Northeastern expecting to graduate in 2018. This semester she is on her first co-op in Uganda interning at a rural hospital in the town of Iganga and establishing a malnutrition treatment program in Namutumba District. She loves to travel, read, and run. Feel free to reach out to her at and LinkedIn, and read her personal blog at