Turning Passion into Progress: Advice from WOMEN who INSPIRE

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

This guest post was written by Katie McCune, an Assistant Co-op Coordinator with the College of Computer and Information Science.

Have you ever been to a panel talk where you were really excited about the topic, but in the end, it was just meh, and you left feeling unenthused? Well, this definitely wasn’t one of those. Recently, I attended “How Innovation and Technology are Business Game Changers,” a panel that was part of Northeastern’s WOMEN who INSPIRE Speaker Series. The idea of the series is to empower the next generation of women leaders, but as evidenced by the large number of male attendees, this panel called to a broad audience. Panelists included Naomi Fried (Chief Innovation Officer of Boston Children’s Hospital), Flora Sah (SVP, COO, Enterprise Risk Management of State Street Corporation), and Deborah Theobald (Co-Founder & CEO of Vecna Technologies). I left feeling genuinely inspired and ready to take action on the lessons learned. So, if you need your own dose of motivation from some impressive people, here ya go:

From left to right, panelists Fried, Sah, and Theoblad. Photo courtesy of WOMEN who INSPIRE

From left to right, panelists Fried, Sah, and Theoblad. Photo courtesy of WOMEN who INSPIRE

Make your own opportunities

The panel kicked off by talking about how each of the women found their jobs. The answers went something like this:

Naomi – “The job I wanted didn’t exist, so I created it”

Flora – “The job I wanted didn’t exist, so I created it”

Deborah – “The company I wanted to work for didn’t exist, so I created it”

See the trend? Good things come to those who seek them out. That’s not to say you need to go create your own job or company, or that it’s easy to create opportunities, but don’t let preconceived boundaries limit you. Maybe, you want to try a completely unique idea for your final project, because it’s more in-line with your passions. Or maybe you want to ask the CEO of your dream company to sit down and have coffee with you. Whatever it is, don’t be afraid to make your own opportunities, which leads us to…

Image Source: http://jonmichail.org/

Image Source: http://jonmichail.org/

Be Confident

Seriously! We’ve all heard mantras like “fake it ‘till you make it” or “attitude is 3/4th of the battle” but these three women are living, breathing proof that confidence really matters. They all shared examples of when their confidence made a difference (can we talk about how much confidence it takes to start a company?) but you could just feel their confidence being in the room. Regardless of what academic level you’re at, by definition as a student, you aren’t an expert in your field. That can be a bit unnerving, but confidence can take you a long ways. As Deborah pointed out, to be successful in any sense of the word, you have to be confident that your passions are worthwhile, even if nobody else sees it right away.

Take Risks

Not only did these women share the fact that they are all confident and made opportunities for themselves, but they are also united in their strong belief that you MUST take risks in order to succeed. Taking risks can be scary. You might fail. Scratch that, you will fail. But as Naomi reminded us, you will learn much more from your failures than your successes, and so even though it’s counterintuitive, failure is a major part of success. So to be successful, you must be able to take some risks.

Michael Jordan quote

Whether success for you means starting your own company, getting a better grade, or speaking up in class, remember these women’s words to help make your dreams a reality.

Katie is currently a Co-op Coordinator for graduate students in the College of Computer and Information science, but got her start as an intern with NU’s Career Development. She’s a Colorado lady at heart and loves anything involving the mountains (especially when her pup can tag along).

5 Things to Know As an International Student Attending the Career Fair (And Maybe As a Domestic Student Too)

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

The Fall Northeastern Career Fair on October 2 is a new experience for many international students (and for domestic students as well).  For some people, the concept of “new” is exciting. For others, “new” is intimidating and can feel uncomfortable.  It’s important to note that being uncomfortable is okay– it’s an indication that you are probably encountering a situation that will contribute to your personal growth. A great way to eliminate some pre-career fair jitters is to prepare as much as possible.  Here are the five things that you should know as an international student attending the Career Fair:

Northeastern Career Fair

Northeastern Career Fair

1.) General Logistics—The Career Fair this year will have over 250 employers with companies like Microsoft , Mathworks, and Akamai Technologies in attendance and will take place from 12-4PM in the Cabot Cage and Solomon Court. Furthermore, there were over 2500 students in attendance last year, and we’re expecting the same attendance for this year.  This means that the career fair will be CROWDED! And lines, especially for very popular companies like Microsoft, will be many people long.  What does this mean for you? Come to the career fair sooner rather than later and come prepared with a list of companies that you want to speak with.  If you don’t, you may be shut out from speaking with an employer or you may feel too overwhelmed to speak to anyone.

2.) Do Your Research on Companies Open to Hiring International Students-The list of organizations attending the career fair is here. Also make sure to download the 2014 Career Fair brochure–there will be no hard copies of the brochure at the fair.  The brochure includes a map of the employer table numbers and where they’re located, and also includes a list of employers who have indicated that they are open to hiring international students.  Be sure to become familiar with that list!  Also do some general research on the company.  The company website, Hoovers, Glassdoor, and Linkedin are all great resources to use when researching.

3.) Prepare Your Pitch— When I was an undergraduate student, I did not go to any of the career fairs my university held (ironic, right?). This was because I was uncomfortable with what to say to an employer and I didn’t know what to do when I got there.  Make sure you practice your pitch, or your thirty second commercial about yourself.  This “pitch” would be an appropriate answer to the nebulous “Tell me about yourself” question, or can give the employer a general understanding of your background and what caused you to be interested in their company.  Appropriate information for the pitch would be your name, major, skills, background, and interest in either the company/position.  To make a great impression, be sure to let them know that you’ve done research on their company by asking intelligent questions. The key here is to be able to ask them other questions besides “What does your company do?”.  That’s not going to impress anyone!  And don’t forget to practice, practice, practice!

4.) Dress Appropriately- Many people feel unsure about what to wear for the fair. A black, grey, brown (neutral) suit and tie is appropriate for males and a skirt suit or pants suit with sensible heels is appropriate for females.  Be sure to not wear too much cologne or perfume, or to wear any flashy jewelry or makeup.  You want them to be listening to what you SAY, not what you look or smell like.

5.) Conduct Yourself Professionally at the Career Fair—This means respecting employers and their time by keeping discussions brief and not keeping them after 4PM. No one leaves the Career Fair with a job, so your main goal is to make an impression and receive a business card to follow-up with them later.  Also, do not bring food/drinks into the Career Fair–they are not permitted and it makes it difficult to shake hands with employers.  Lastly, don’t go “shopping” at the fair.  I know many employers come with cool little gadgets, but don’t make those freebies your main focus for attending the career fair!

Remember, the more prepared you are for the fair, the better you equip yourself to navigate it successfully.  Also, don’t forget to check out our Career Fair Success Tips Panel on September 30th. Representatives from Gorton’s, Liberty Mutual, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Constant Contact will tell you exactly what they like to see from students at Career Fairs.  Remember, no matter what happens, the career fair is a great experience that can prepare you for the job search process and networking after graduation. Enjoy it!

Ashley LoBue is an Assistant Director at Northeastern Career Development.  A Boston College graduate, Ashley has over 4 years of experience working in higher education and is a proponent for international and experiential education.  Ashley also enjoys binge-watching HGTV and aspires to be like the Property Brothers, Drew and Jonathan, as a possible secondary career. 

5 Pinterest Boards To Boost Your Career

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

laptop

Can mining social media be beneficial to your career? You heard it here first! Social media outlets like Pinterest can provide career guidance and inspiration for the visual learner.

Brooke McKee’s Resume Design Board: If you’re starting from scratch or just want to give your current design a quick renovation, start with this board for inspiration.

Follow Brooke McKee’s board Resume Design on Pinterest.

The Prepary’s Common Interview Questions Decoded Board: Step into the interviewer’s shoes with a few of these common interview questions and how to approach them. Co-op application season just became a breeze!

Follow Prepary’s board Common Interview Questions Decoded on Pinterest.

UNL Career Service’s Men’s Professional Attire Board: This board will teach you everything you need to know, from how to fold a pocket square to how to roll a suit.

Follow UNL Career Service’s board Men’s Professional Attire on Pinterest.

Professionelle’s What We Wear Board: Looking for inspiration for your fall work wardrobe? This board is the perfect resource for identifying key workplace looks that never go out of style.

Follow Professionelle’s board What We Wear on Pinterest.

Long Beach Public Library’s Best of Business/Career Board: Build your fall reading list with some of the best books for your career including Outliers, The Power of Habit, and the $100 Startup.

Follow Long Beach Public Library’s board Best of Business/Career on Pinterest.

From creating your fall reading list to building your fall co-op wardrobe, Pinterest can be a stellar resource for young professionals and workplace veterans alike.

Lindsey Sampson is a junior International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and tweet her @lindseygsampson.

Thinking Ahead: An Approach to Getting Your Dream Internship

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

internship post-it pic

This guest post was written by Scarlett Ho, a third year student majoring in International Affairs and Political Science, with a minor in Law and Public Policy.

Securing your dream internship- that is the highlight of your college career- can be daunting. It takes years of planning and preparation as well as numerous rejections. Regardless of what stage of the search process you are at, a couple words of advice to heed throughout your search are to be aggressive and to think strategically. With that in mind, below are my tips for being an efficient internship seeker.

1. Plan early

It is never a bad thing to plan early. If you know what your ultimate end goal is, or even if you don’t know exactly what you want to do after graduation, you should at least have a rough idea of the parameters of the areas you want to explore. Thus, it is crucial you create a bold action plan to make the most out of your time here.

As an International Affairs and Political Science major, I might not know precisely what I want to do after I graduate (e.g. lobbyists, diplomat, Hill staffers, think tank analysts, etc.), but I know that these are roughly the options I have, and the goal of an internship is to try out all these areas during my undergraduate years to test the waters and explore my passion. You should have a list of organizations and companies that you are interested in organize it well and create a timeline.  Try jotting down your dream organizations just off the top of your head and see how many you can come up with, then do some internet research to find more organizations that may have internship opportunities and add them to your list. Set deadlines for yourself and hold yourself accountable for meeting them.

2. Create a Comprehensive Internship Database

Although Northeastern has a sophisticated myNEU Cool database that offers numerous co-op jobs, if you are bit more ambitious and are interested in more internship opportunities, sometimes you have to look outward and create your own personalized database. The reason you should do that is being 1. some jobs are not listed on the system/you are not authorized to view them because of certain settings; 2. the school has not yet developed a relationship with the organization (but you should not limit your options because of that). Take note of outside internship search engines like InternMatch.com, HuskyCareerLink and broader search engines like SimplyHired and Indeed to aid your search and build up your database. Also, check out the Internship Guide on the Career Development website for more ideas.

3. Stay Organized

Once you find a list of internships and organizations you are interested in, how do you organize them in an effective and easy-to-read manner that would serve as a roadmap for applying? For me, I create a Google Doc spreadsheet because it is easily accessible everywhere, and I can share the file to multiple accounts. Moreover, I can also make changes easily and invite people to contribute to my list.

Within the document, I categorize the different job natures and put as much information as possible. Using my career interest as an example, in the excel document, I created tabs for government jobs, campaigns, NGOs, think tanks, etc and provided other details such as time of internship, application period, deadline, compensation, location, materials needed (such as recommendation letters, transcript). I would also put a column where I gauge my chances (just like college applications) – safety, match, or dream; and note what year of students the organizations are looking for. And so, even if you were a sophomore, you would be aware of the dream internship that only takes rising seniors, and you can strategize accordingly.

4. Connect with People and Ask Questions

I’ve found that from the objective internship description that organizations usually offer on their websites, it is hard to get a sense of what the job entails and envisage whether or not it aligns with your interests. To save time from applying and interviewing for a job that you might not like, the best way is to ask former interns and alumni who worked there before. Through searching on LinkedIn or Facebook (if you are friends with them), you can target those people and send them a message to meet up for coffee or for general questions. In my experience, it is likely that people would offer help or a piece of advice. The informational interview will help you understand the following things: tips on application process, a day-to-day work schedule, and whether he/she can introduce you to people you should know. Be sure to write a thank you message to the person as a professional gesture afterwards.

Creating an internship database in the form of a timeline goes a long way in helping you navigate the tedious internship seeking process. Be sure to connect with alumni and existing connections on the way to find out about more opportunities and whether or not the job would be a good fit for you! Good luck.

Scarlett Ho is a third year student majoring in International Affairs and Political Science, with a minor in Law and Public Policy. She is a former Capitol Hill intern and will be interning at the European Parliament this fall with NU’s study abroad program. As a trilingual, she is interested in foreign affairs and diplomacy, and is an avid globetrotter. Connect with Scarlett on LinkedIn and follow her on Twitter.

Photo source: Culpwrit via HeatherRHuhman.com

The Five Advanced Nursing Roles that Nobody Knows About

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

GroupofNursesA Registered Nurse (RN) works in various settings and with different patient populations. You can find him/her caring for people in world-class hospitals or in the slums of third-world countries. He/she is the central point of care for a patient and their beacon of advocacy. What most people do not know is that there are so many pathways in a nursing career. These rewarding roles are in high demand and cater to an advanced specialty, thus all requiring post-graduate education.

  1. Nurse Practitioner (NP) – A nurse practitioner is an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) that can perform a comprehensive physical exam and medical history, order medical treatments, diagnostic tests, and medications for acute and chronic medical conditions. There are different types of NPs: pediatric, geriatric, family, women’s health, and mental health. He/she may work in inpatient settings like hospitals or in outpatient settings like clinics. They bridge the gap between RNs and MDs and are a critical and up-and-coming role in the ever-changing and complex American healthcare system. A patient may choose to have a nurse practitioner as a primary care provider to collaborate with their medical care.
  1. Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) – A clinical nurse specialist is a source of knowledge and expertise for RNs to consult with in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. They help implement evidenced-based practice interventions within three spheres of practice – with patients, nursing staff, or within the healthcare system. He/she can work with different populations, settings, or diseases.
  1. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) – A nurse anesthetist specializes in the administration of anesthesia. Their scope of practice includes all anesthesia techniques including local, spinal, epidural, etc. and usually practice under the supervision of an anesthesiologist. They are an important figure in anesthesia care in our armed forces and in third-world countries.
  1. Nurse Manager/Administrator – These nurse leaders are responsible for managing a nursing unit. He/she coordinates the quality of care provided by staff and manages the environment in which that care is delivered. They are sources of direction and knowledge and a unifier in a nursing team.
  1. Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) – A nurse midwife specializes in midwifery. They function as the primary care provider for relatively healthy women during pregnancy whose births are not classified as complicated or “high risk.” They can also provide gynecological care and newborn care. They offer a unique medical practice away from hospitals and respect the wishes of how a woman wants to give birth. He/she is a figure of empowerment in women’s health.

Angelica is a fourth-year nursing student with a minor in English hailing from New Jersey. She has studied or worked in all the major Boston hospitals. Angelica is also a columnist for The Huntington News and enjoys writing creative non-fiction. 

Photo source: OnlineNursePractitionerPrograms.com

Getting Their Ear: Understanding Connectors’ Interests

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Tad Info Interview picSo, you’ve decided to link up with a connector for an informational interview. Great, but do you feel you are asking for a favor—i.e. for advice and guidance—without offering anything in return? This misconception undermines informational interviews in a couple of serious ways. First, asking for a favor can be intimidating; and second, it will limit your notion of what the informational interview is.

Focus on interests – yours and theirs

View the informational interview as a negotiation. Ask: “How do I get what I need from this interview in a way that meets the connector’s interests as well?”

Certain interests are common to nearly all connectors. Put yourself in their shoes and consider what you’re in a position to offer them, such as:

  • Recognition: being valued for their expertise
  • Reputation: being viewed as a facilitator or mentor
  • Convenience: having their schedule accommodated (and therefore respected)
  • Insight: understanding you and your perspectives on the field; and how their advice helps to advance an up-and-comer
  • Utility: meeting a potential collaborator/employee who may fill their staffing needs in the future
  • Affiliation: enjoying the opportunity to have an engaging interaction with an interesting (and perhaps like-minded) individual
  • Status: distinguishing them as someone of prominence and importance in the field
  • Appreciation: acknowledging the sharing of their time, attention, and wisdom

Interests are specific to the person. What do you know about what these people are like or would like? For instance, some connectors don’t often interact with colleagues in their field, or adjacent fields, and they may genuinely welcome the opportunity to learn from you or to hear updates about other people in their field who you’ve already contacted. Take one of Carly’s experiences, for instance:

When I was working in the conflict resolution field and considering switching careers into mental health, a lot of the psychotherapists I met for informational interviews genuinely welcomed the chance to learn from me about dispute resolution and mediation. These topics pertain to psychotherapy, but the professional paths of mediators and therapists don’t often cross. I was really happy to find myself adding something of value to those conversations.

This is important sign

Guidelines for requesting an informational interview

Here are some useful guidelines for requesting an informational interview, followed by a sample email. We generally make these requests over email, so we’re focusing on written requests; however, most of these guidelines apply similarly to a phone or in-person request.

Tone and content 

  • Do not write in a way that assumes they will say yes. You’re asking, so your phrasing should make clear that the meeting is conditional on their response: “If yes, would you have any availability the week of the 8th?”
  • Your tone should demonstrate that you’re flexible and willing to make this as convenient as possible for them.
  • Show gratitude and let them know you’d value their input: “I’d value the chance to ask you a few questions about your professional background and the field.”
  • If they don’t know you, include a brief, engaging description of who you are and why you’re interested in meeting them. Don’t give your life story; give three or four sentences, max. In particular, mention topics or experiences that you value in common.
  • Use your knowledge of a given connector or your general understanding of the field or the industry landscape to speak to other interests. If you know that they’re concerned with leaving a positive legacy, let them know that their advice will help you positively influence the future of the field.

Logistics

  • Think about their schedule depending on their job, their field, family situation, etc. Be sensitive to when they’re likely to be free.
  • Make sure you nail down the specifics before the meeting: time (accounting for time-zone differences); location; whether or not meals are involved; phone vs. in-person; if by phone, who is initiating the call, and at what number.
  • Once you have a meeting scheduled, it’s good practice to send a confirmation email a day or two before the appointed date. This is a helpful reminder that busy connectors will appreciate. It shows them that you’re responsible and lowers the likelihood that you’ll be stood up without notice.

Sample email

Dear Betty,

I hope that you’ve been enjoying a wonderful spring thus far.

I am recently out of college and trying to work my way into the negotiation and conflict resolution worlds. I have been meeting with as many interesting and accomplished people as I can to hear their stories and gain their counsel. Both John Doe and Jane Smith mentioned that you would be a great person to speak with. They both spoke of your ingenuity in entering this world and, more broadly, in navigating the challenges and stresses of career-building for someone in their mid-twenties.

I would be truly grateful if you had time in the coming week to meet me for a brief conversation. I can make time during any of the days except Thursday and will happily come to you.

Thank you for your time and best wishes,

Justin

Tad Mayer is an adjunct professor at D’Amore-McKim teaching Negotiating in Business. This blog article is an edited excerpt from End the Job Hunt, a book due out in 2015. Mr. Mayer is co-author with Justin Wright (who also teaches the class) and Carly Inkpen.

Photo source: Flickr Creative Commons, Coffee time

4 Things I Didn’t Learn in College (but wish I had)

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

ego-deflatedThis guest post was written by NU Alum Kelly (Sullivan) Good she currently works as geologist at Environmental Resources Management in Chicago. 

When I graduated from college, I was convinced I knew everything. I mean, it was right there on paper: good grades, multiple awards; let’s face it, I was a great student. And I was pretty sure I was going to ace the Real World too (cue the “wah wah” as we picture my metaphorical ego being deflated). It turns out, there were several ways in which I was very much under prepared.

Don’t get me wrong, Northeastern prepared me very well. I learned a ton about my chosen field thanks to fabulous professors, I learned time management, I learned how to craft a great resume and cover letter, I learned how to write about a variety of subjects, and most importantly I learned how to learn. I certainly would not be where I am today without a Northeastern degree under my belt.

Even so there were some subtle tips I just didn’t pick up in college. But never fear, it’s not too late to start integrating them into your life right now!

1. You can’t just look good on paper and expect others to notice you.

It took me a long time to find a job, despite having a solid resume.  Grades matter, yes, but so do a host of other factors and often it boils down to who you know. You hear it all the time: network. So start early, Huskies. Establish solid, lasting relationships with mentors at your co-op. Perfect and re-perfect your cover letter. You can never spend too much time job searching.

2. There are no grades at work

Well, duh. But this one took me by surprise. In college, there is a fairly standard metric to measure yourself on, at work there isn’t. It’s hard to know how you are well you are doing, unless of course you really mess up. At my job my supervisor gives me a task, I complete it and move to the next one. I spent the first three months convinced I was doing everything wrong because I wasn’t constantly being graded. It turns out, all I had to do was ask. This will likely vary by industry and by supervisor, but once I sought feedback from colleagues I became much more confident. Practice this at school by asking your professors and classmates to look over assignments before handing them in. Don’t be afraid to schedule an appointment with your professor to talk about ways you can improve, this is totally normal in the Real World.

3. You’re no longer just working for yourself

At NEU, I would pick and choose assignments to devote a lot of time to depending on how they affected my grade. I also developed the poor habit of doing all of a group project because I couldn’t trust anyone else to do it right. I did everything for myself because my grades didn’t affect anyone else but me. Not so much in the Real World. Every task you’re given has a purpose. Your company is depending on you to complete it well. Additionally, most of what you do is part of a larger project. You must learn to be courteous of others’ time, and learn that you cannot possibly take care of everything. Begin now by completing all of your assignments to the best of your abilities and by taking advantage of the shared responsibility that comes with group projects.

4. You can’t always research your way to the right answer

This was the most difficult for me to get used to. Before starting my job, I spent three straight years as graduate student researching my thesis. I was very good at reading scientific articles and even spent whole days and weeks looking for small pieces of information that would push my research to the next level. Ain’t nobody got time for that in the Real World, my friends. If you don’t immediately know the answer to a problem, start asking around. You will save a ton of time using the combined knowledge of your colleagues instead of trying to Google something that’s super industry-specific. This one is a little harder to work on while in college. Obviously, you can’t just ask your professor for the answer, and too much collaboration with your classmates can be considered cheating. So I recommend you continue to research and study the way that works best for you, but try not to forget all that information you learned. It might come in handy some day, and you may be the one your colleagues come to for answers.

In all, it’s not too bad out here in the Real World, but I do know I would have been much better off had I known these things before graduating!

Kelly (Sullivan) Good graduated from Northeastern’s College of Arts and Sciences in May 2010 with a degree in Environmental Science. She received her Master’s in Geology from the University of Utah in 2013 and currently works as geologist at Environmental Resources Management in Chicago. She can be reached at kellygood88@gmail.com

Photo: sourced from EWW­Magazine

Say “Yes” And Make This Your Best Semester Ever

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

say yes quote tina feyWith a new semester comes a whole new crop of classes, new students, new professors, and incredible new opportunities to grow as a student and a future professional. As a student, we are faced with options and decisions to go further every day. Maybe your professor has an idea for a research project and he’s looking for a research assistant. Maybe your favorite student group is running a conference and needs someone to manage logistics and operations. Maybe an internship position opened up that can fill your day off. Every day it seems these opportunities for growth and expansion present themselves on campus, inside and outside of the classroom.

The summer after my sophomore year, I met a consultant at a conference who ended up being my future boss. While I was on co-op, he offered me a position running communication and client relationships at a five-person publishing software company. It sounded like an awesome opportunity, but the idea of trading two easy breezy months at the beach for a full-time internship after six months of co-op was daunting. I ended up taking the job, hustling and couch surfing my way through an incredible two month learning experience. Looking back, I could not imagine a more meaningful way to spend the second half of my summer, but it took a leap of faith and more than a little uncertainty.

The difference between an average semester and an incredible semester is your ability to say “yes” to opportunities that compel you. If it seems to big for you or you feel under-qualified, try it anyway. You will surprise yourself. The worst thing that can happen is a healthy dose of rejection. College is about making the moves that feel right to better yourself emotionally and personally. It’s about find your comfort zone walls and pushing on them.

So how can you find opportunities? Run for a leadership position. Start a side hustle. Sit on a board. Apply for an internship. Try anything that moves you in the right direction.

The poet e e cummings once wrote, “I imagine that yes is the only living thing.” A simple “yes” can push you to brand new ground in your life — ground you have yet to explore. Yes will bring you new friendships with people who will encourage, influence, and inspire you. Yes will bring you to new experiences to expand your boundaries. Yes will shape your future.

Lindsey Sampson is a junior International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and tweet her @lindseygsampson.

Photo source: BeautyBets.com

A Beginner’s Guide to Submitting to Literary Magazines

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

writingWhether you are an English major trying to expand your portfolio or a closet writer with a desire to be heard, navigating the world of literary magazines and journals can be daunting. Here’s a timeline and tips to submitting and getting published!

1. Write and write some more!

Start journaling or keeping track of pieces you’ve written for school or just for fun. The more work you have the better chance of submitting something somewhere that will be appreciated or is in demand.

2. Workshop and edit

Have people whose opinion you value and trust to read your work. Go to writing centers and attend workshops where professionals in the industry can lend you advice on how to revise a piece. Make sure you are confident and proud about what you are submitting!

3. Research and sift

Now that you have a substantial piece, go on online databases to look up magazines and journals that fit your interests and qualifications. A medical piece would not belong in a nature journal and a novice writer would probably not be submitting to Glimmer Train (which has an acceptance rate lower than Harvard admissions). Sites like NewPages and Poets & Writers have reliable search engines that can help you narrow down your options.

4. Follow in the paths of similar writers

Did someone in your class or writing group get published? Ask them about it and it’s likely that being of similar ability/interest, you would be a good fit for that place too! Networking as a writer is so important to get behind-the-scenes tips on what publications are looking for and there’s nothing more valuable than a fellow writer that has been there too.

5. Follow in the path of better writers

Who are the writers you admire and whose work inspires you to put your voice on paper? Take a look at where their first publications were and work up to that quality. Choosing lit mags is very much like choosing colleges – you have to have several safety ones, some matches, and one or two reaches. Having a goal like getting published in The Huffington Post or The New Yorker directs your practice as a writer and motivates you to be better every day.

6. Adhere to guidelines and instructions

Many magazines and journals have very specific guidelines on what they are looking for in submissions. That may be in formatting, fees, word count, genre, and anything else you can think of. Since writing is subjective, one person may love your style and the next not care for it. Nevertheless, keep submitting! Keep in mind Pablo Picasso’s wise words, “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”

7. Always write for one person- you

Don’t ever get caught up in the woes of the slush pile. A rejection doesn’t define you as a writer and you have nothing to prove to anyone. Always remember why you picked up the craft- for your love of storytelling or way with words. Writing in and of itself is a solitary act so join a group, share your work online and in print, and put the self in self-expression.

Angelica is a fourth-year nursing student with a minor in English hailing from New Jersey. She has studied or worked in all the major Boston hospitals. Angelica is also a columnist for The Huntington News and enjoys writing creative non-fiction. 

Photo source: Flickr Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarahreido/

 

Northeastern Aime Cameo Macarons!

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone
Clockwise: Owner Kinesha in front of the Cameo Macaron truck, chocolate macarons, macaron medley, NU love at the order window

Clockwise from top left: Owner Kinesha in front of the Cameo Macaron truck, chocolate macarons, macaron medley, NU love at the order window

“Macaroon is the Italian cookie with the shredded coconut… you can say French Macaroon and get away with it or you can say Macaron [mah-kah-rōn].” And so begins my interview with Northeastern University alumna and food truck founder, Kinesha Goldson. Disenchanted with corporate life as a buyer and craving the macarons she’d grown to love while studying abroad in Paris, Goldson founded food truck Cameo Macaron in the summer of 2013.

“I just wanted everyone to have the French experience I had in Paris”. Respecting the risk, but inspired by her Parisian visit and her love for baking, she developed a checklist of things she would need to start a food truck and decided to go for it. She credits Northeastern –particularly its overall flexibility along with her co-ops for inspiring her personal and professional confidence and her ability to take risks, “Just knowing and having that experience, sometimes you try things, you don’t like it, you learn from it and you move on.” Goldson, having gone through this, was originally a Criminal Justice major and switched to Communications after her first co-op when she realized it wasn’t a good fit.

“I’m using the heck out of my communications degree” she exclaims! With an Instagram following of over 1,500, Goldson had her social media sites up and running before even buying the truck, garnering her sufficient buzz citywide before their first bite. Now, more than a year later Goldson has regulars flocking to her truck daily and is catering everything from bridal showers to baptisms.

Naturally business-minded, she details how the best ideas are based on convenience. “If somebody is going through their everyday life and they’re saying to themselves, ‘I hate this, it would be so much better if [fill in the blank]’ than you have a good idea.” To that end, her advice to future entrepreneurs: keep an idea journal and only share your ideas with people you truly trust. She also cautions new entrepreneurs to pursue the least costly idea first and then use the money made to invest in their next idea. If feasible, pay for as much as possible in cash so you can break even more quickly. Goldson’s family, friends and personal savings allowed her to fund Cameo Macaron and she acknowledges how lucky she is for not owing anyone anything.

Not surprisingly, owning a business comes with its challenges, as Goldson explains that it’s hard to find good and reliable help and she does everything from driving the truck to ordering inventory to managing the socials. “It’s so rewarding though when people walk up and are so excited. There’s so much risk involved and what keeps it going is that people get it and support you; knowing that your idea is relatable is a great feeling.”

“It’s a lot of work, but it’s so rewarding”. Further touting her experience at Northeastern, Goldson explains, “It helps being around like-minded people who have that Northeastern entrepreneurial spirit and can-do attitude, it’s really inspiring.” Check out Cameo Macaron’s schedule and hop over for a macaron or five. I would highly recommend the pistachio and rose petal (yes, rose petal) – you’ll be just slightly more Parisian after you do.

Follow Cameo Macaron on Twitter and Instagram to get the latest updates and locations.