Battle Your Stress

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anxiety

I am a highly anxious person. Point blank, that is who I am, no matter how many times I’ve tried to change it. But, after years of practice, I’ve been able to research and narrow down helpful methods of tackling my anxiety and stress head on.

How many times have you been at work and find yourself blankly staring at a list of things to do with no idea where to begin? According to Forbes.com, the average business professional has between 30 and 100 projects on their plate. Unruly to-do lists and a never-ending set of distractions from phones to Facebook lead us to these heightened states of stress.

So, how do we battle this growing problem (and to-do lists)? Below are my tried and true methods to calm down, focus, and get stuff done.

Take a Deep Breath | Sounds simple, right? It’s one of the easiest things out there to level your mind and take your blood pressure down a notch. In a method borrowed from traditional yoga practices, the act of sama vritti, or “equal breathing” is a practice to calm and soothe. In her new book Do Your Om Thing, yogi Rebecca Pacheco, explains the method: “the idea is to evenly match the length of your inhale to that of your exhale.” So, sit down, feet flat on the ground, and breath in… breath out…

De-Clutter | A messy space makes a messy mind. Take 20 or 30 minutes, to tidy up your living room, workspace, bedroom, kitchen, you name it! Making space in your living and working area will free up space in your mind as well.

Eat Right | It’s so easy to get caught up in the flurry and decide to chow down on a Bolocco burrito and chips rather than a well-balanced meal. While that’s great to do every now and then (I do love the occasional burrito bowl), but it can catch up to you. Research suggests that eating sugary and processed foods can increase symptoms of anxiety.

Catch some Zzz’s |  Do you frequently pull all-nighters? Are you a night owl? Well, be warned, because research shows that you are a heightened risk for chronic medical conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and mood disorders. While one night of little sleep can leave you grumpy, continued lack of sleep can have lasting effects. “Chronic sleep issues have been correlated with depression, anxiety, and mental distress.” Get some shut eye, turn off the electronics, relax your muscles, and drift off into a nice rest that will leave you refreshed and ready to tackle the next day.

If you need one final push for a happier, more stress-free day, just take a break and bust a move to your favorite song. (This is mine)

Here’s to an anxiety-free day! Let’s get to it!

Tatum Hartwig is a 4th year Communication Studies major with minors in Business Administration and Media & Screen Studies. Tatum brings experience and knowledge in the world of marketing and public relations from her two co-ops at Wayfair and New Balance. Her passion revolves around growing businesses via social media, brand development, and innovation. You can connect with Tatum on Twitter @tatumrosy, Instagram @tatumrose, and LinkedIn.

How to Prioritize When Everything is a Priority

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We all know the feeling: Waking up in the morning, getting to work and realizing there is so much to be done that you don’t even know where to start. I have fallen culprit to this feeling one too many times, and had you asked me a few months ago, I would have said there is no way to avoid the frustration from too many responsibilities. I consider myself to be a notorious planner, but what I have recently realized is that planning does not mean prioritizing. Prioritizing means determining what the most important thing on your to-do list is, and sticking to one task at a time.

Here are some ways to start prioritizing and organizing during your workdays.

1. Make lists your best friend.

“Divide and conquer” is a great way to make your workload seem more approachable. I recommend a good, old fashioned list, wherein number one is the most pressing task, number two the next, and so on and so forth. Once you have created a general to-do list, add details to each number. If number one reads, “Write monitoring and evaluation report,” what are the actual steps to getting this done? These steps can be listed as 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, etc. I draw boxes next to each item on my list, so that I can check them off as I work. Not only does this help keep me on track, but it lets me see what I have accomplished so far, and all of my next steps.

2. Celebrate every task well done.

It’s hard to stick to your priorities and create new ones when you feel unproductive, discouraged or overwhelmed. Establish a reward system for yourself that is balanced in both challenging you to get work done, but satisfying when you finish one of your priorities. Typical reward systems often involve both food and getting out of the office, such as, “When I finish the monitoring and evaluation report, I will go get a latte across the street.” Give yourself a reward that you will truly enjoy, and that will give your mind a break for a bit. You deserve it!

3. Try “Tab-less Tuesdays.”

This is a prioritizing tool that I just learned about last week. Every Tuesday, one of my coworkers goes completely “tab-less”- meaning that he only has one tab open on his Internet browser at any given time. This system inherently forces him to judge his tasks based on urgency, because he can literally only focus on one task at a time. If an entire Tuesday seems like too much at first, try a half-day, or two tabs- anything that will keep you mindful and focused on only one thing.

 

Daniella is a sophomore at Northeastern with a combined major in Human Services and International Affairs, and a minor in Spanish. She is currently on her first co-op working for a youth development nonprofit organization in Cape Town, South Africa. Daniella is passionate about social change, travel, and good food- and can’t wait to see what Africa has to offer her both professionally and personally. Email her at emami.d@husky.neu.edu. Look for Daniella’s posts every other Tuesday.

5 Alums, 5 Years Later: Mike Adamson

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Class of 2010

It’s hard to imagine I stepped onto Northeastern’s campus almost 10 years ago to begin my freshman year. And now I’m 5 years removed from a place where I learned a lot inside and outside of the classroom, it all moves very fast. Since leaving Northeastern I’ve worked for two different companies, lived back home and in the city, been able to travel, and have kept myself relatively busy and active. I currently work as a Campus Recruiter where I’m able to travel back to college campuses and brand and recruit for a company I enjoy working for and am interested in. I’ve met a lot of students in this role and as oblivious as I was about post-collegiate life, it’s somewhat relieving to know that a lot of other students were, and still are, in the same boat. It is a big adjustment, but it’s an exciting and completely different experience that needs to be approached with an open mind.

After I graduated, I rejoined a previous co-op employer of mine. It was a great decision and because of my previous experience with them I was thrown a lot of responsibility right away. I was also living with friends that I grew up with from home in the Boston area. None of us went to college together but we stayed in touch, it was an easy fit and a great living situation. Both my work life and my social life were comfortable right after graduation, now that I think about that, it made the transition into the “real world” all the smoother. I didn’t realize it at the time, but maintaining those relationships with previous co-workers and friends got my post collegiate life kicked off in the right direction. Over the course of the last 5 years maintaining those contacts and relationships has been more challenging given the hectic work-life balancing act. But whether it is for my professional or personal life it has always proved to be worth the effort.

Work-life balance is important, but what work-life balance means to me might not mean the same to you. I work in a role where there are very busy, hectic times of the year but I enjoy the planning, travel, execution, and impact of my work. This is the same for most jobs, there will always be ebbs and flows to your workload, so be flexible with your idea of work-life balance. The times where I have been the busiest have also been the most fun. So while I may be working longer I don’t feel as if I’m making an exception. The days never feel as long or draining as they may appear because I’m engaged and enjoy the people I work with. On the opposite end of the spectrum there are times where things are slow, and I need to create work, which is great, or I’m able to catch up on responsibilities in my personal life. You won’t know what your ideal work-life balance is until you start working, and not every company and job will offer what you’re looking for. So be flexible and allow time for adjustments.

The last 5 years have also flown by because I’ve been willing to try new things. Whether it’s traveling, joining a club/team, changing up my routine, taking on a new project, or just taking myself out of my comfort zone it’s all kept my life interesting. This is probably very similar to a college experience where you are dumped into this new place with unfamiliar faces and environments you need to learn and navigate . It’s a different type of learning in post-collegiate life but being willing to say yes and continue exploring and learning has created a very fulfilling experience for me so far. I do find there are times where I’m spread a little thin or the day-to-day feels stagnant, but being cognizant of the fact that it’s my decision to change my routine, and being willing to do so, has made the last 5 years a great experience.

Mike Adamson is a Campus Recruiter with Vistaprint(Cimpress) and is a 2010 graduate of Northeastern. He majored in Psychology with a Business Admin. minor and played on the club lacrosse team. Feel free to contact Mike at Adamson.m.r@gmail.com.

How to Overcome International Co-op Culture Shock

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Finding my way around the chaos of downtown Kampala.

Finding my way around the chaos of downtown Kampala.

Focus on the bright spots. In any place you go, you might initially find that you hate a lot about the place you’re in. The food is weird! There are crazy drivers! Step back and reframe. Although there might be some not-so-great things, there must be something good, however big or small, about your new environment. E.g., I really don’t like the mushy eggplant and flavorless maize mash that I often have to eat, but I can’t wait to have cabbage again! No one speaks English or understands what I’m saying, but what an opportunity for complete language immersion!

Connect with the community. It’s easy to go to a country and stay in a comfort bubble, but it’s not the best way to engage yourself in the local culture. Connecting with the community can be as simple as learning how to cook a local dish, attending a neighborhood church, or bargaining for fruit at the market. Learn how things are done locally, and try to assimilate. Remember that you are a guest in the country, so although you may look and think differently, you should be making the effort to learn the culture and adapt to your surroundings rather than having others adapt to your foreignness.

Continue hobbies from home. Something that can help with homesickness is to find an activity that you can take with you anywhere. While everything around you is changing, you are the same person wherever you go. Think portable. Cameras, sketchbooks, e-readers, journals. Personally, I like to read and run, and I can do both pretty much anywhere with just my kindle and running shoes. I even had the opportunity to participate in a triathlon while I was here, which was an incredible experience!

Embrace the unfamiliar. Of course things are different, but it just means there’s more to learn. Take the opportunity to learn a new language, make new friends, and discover cultural attitudes. You’re surrounded by a whole new world for a few months, so take your time to discover and appreciate as much as you can. Get excited about the fact that you might get lost in a crazy new city. Don’t be afraid to try strange foreign food that doesn’t sound very appealing. Stimulate your sense of adventure.

Create experiences with new friends. Travel around your new country! Go to a concert! Climb a mountain! Most things are more fun in a group – it can relieve stress, create bonding moments, and allow you to reflect upon your journey along the way. So be open to doing some crazy things when you’re with friends that you normally wouldn’t do by yourself. If you happen to be in Uganda, go white-water rafting on the Nile, climb Sipi Falls, and run the MTN marathon!

Maintain communication lines. When you’re going international, as much as you embrace your new life, you shouldn’t forget your old one. Co-ops are only six months long, and you don’t want to return realizing that you lost contact with all your friends from school and have to redo your freshman year socializing. Most places you go should have some Internet connection, whether it is luxurious WiFi or portable modem, so there isn’t much of an excuse to not contact friends and family. There are a number of smartphone apps that allow you to text or call internationally without crazy fees, including WeChat, WhatsApp, GroupMe, and Google Hangouts, just to name a few.

Record your experiences. Keep a blog, take a photo a day, or start a collection. An international co-op should be something you remember for the rest of your life, so make sure you have something to remember and show from your time abroad. For the past few weeks, I’ve been sending my father a photo a day of whatever I happen to experience over the day. By the end of the six months, I’m sure it will make an interesting slideshow: a mishmash of scenery, food, city, work, and people, that I can keep to reminisce about my amazing experience.

Mika White is a second year biochemistry major at Northeastern expecting to graduate in 2018. This semester she’s on her first co-op in Uganda interning at a rural hospital in the town of Entebbe. Mika loves to travel, read, and run. Feel free to reach out to her at white.mik@husky.neu.edu and check out her personal blog for more a more detailed account of her experiences. 

The Case For International Co-op

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Map

Why leave Boston? I mean, it has practically every amenity, every resource, and every luxury you could possibly need. The standard of living, both nationally and internationally, is quite high. Around every street corner, there is something that will satisfy your hunger, whether it is for food, drink, or entertainment. Not only that, but the density of academic institutions and research centers is unrivaled in the United States. In what other U.S. city can you walk along five college campuses in 20 minutes? And, well, last but not least, Bostonians enjoy the changing seasons of the fall, winter, spring, and summer (although, the winter’s can be quite unforgiving – cheers to missing over 100 inches of snowfall). We are adaptive to these changing seasons, squeezing every bit out of each day, each week, and each year that we spend in our city. We’re a proud bunch of people, we’ll live and die by Fenway, we’ll wake up in the early hours of the morning to run or row along the Charles, and when push comes to shove, we will proudly represent Boston, MA and proclaim the city as America’s best.

There’s no other time in your life like your twenties, especially as a Northeastern student living off of the fruits of your labor during the sweet six (or so) months of your co-op. We’re not quite full-time employees, yet, we’re not exactly the intern – and we can still reap the benefits that the title, “student” bestows upon us. After having taken advantage of Boston’s resources, utilizing every which alley of knowledge we’ve been left to explore, using every tool we’ve been trained to employ, and immersing ourselves amongst some of the best professionals in the business – why not go ahead and take these things (along with your passport) and make use of them?

It’s a tough decision, leaving your friends, your family, and everything familiar behind. It isn’t a semester studying abroad, you’re not housed with other students from your university, and you’re not in a place where you are actively put in a position to learn. Co-op abroad grants you the freedom to explore, discover, and manifest your visions of a life after university, working in the field of your choosing. It’s a pretty cool life-style.

I’m just hitting over the two-month mark (of seven) of my time here in Thailand. I’ve been fortunate enough to travel all around the country and even to places such as Singapore and Indonesia. South East Asia offers budget travel options, and going from Ho Chi Minh to Jakarta to Manila to Yangon isn’t so much of a far-fetched itinerary if planned correctly. Needless to say, I’ve made lifelong friendships, enjoyed some great company, and have devoured some great authentic cuisine.

The clinical portion of my co-op is now over, from the wound dressings, learning the basic techniques behind suturing patients, to the fieldwork and home visits, I have truly come to appreciate all that I’ve been able to witness and experience first-hand. In the coming weeks, I’ll have the opportunity to work alongside academics and scholars from all around the world in order to understand our most pressing health needs.

If you want the opportunity to create the life you dreamed of living, pursue an international co-op. Okay, perhaps that last sentence was a bit over zealous, but go ahead and start searching. Don’t be afraid. At times, travel can be difficult, especially when you are without the basic comforts of your home. New York Pizza isn’t right around the corner, nor is Newbury Street just a stone’s throw away. However, the excitement, the novelty, and access to new ideas, information, culture, and ways of thinking will take you much farther in the scope of it all. Go on.

John is a 4th year health sciences student at The Bouvé College of Health Sciences. With a nose for exploration and travel, John will be writing from Southeast Asia about his experiences on co-op in Surin and Bangkok, Thailand. There, he’ll be volunteering in community clinics, in addition to conducting public health research at Chulalongkorn University. Follow his adventures on Instagram: johnsirisuth.

How a Co-op Interview Changed The Way I Solve Problems

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works

Few things are more nerve-wrecking during co-op season than an e-mail attachment.

Oh, a project? Before I’m employed?

Alright now.

A couple weeks ago I was faced with a co-op case study in design thinking. So, maybe I got it Tuesday of spring break and didn’t start it until Monday. Maybe I started it on the plane on the way aback from Costa Rica. Maybe I did that. This case ended up being one of the more exciting and rewarding projects of 2015 so far – I presented it at my interview, got the job, and I’m happy to say I will be working there starting in July. It moved the needle of my thought process, and it can move yours too. Here are a few important things to think about when solving a large, complicated problem:

  • Push all of your assumptions aside. Whenever you confront a problem, large or small, you approach it with a set of unique experiences and assumptions about the problem. These are important to realize, and important to put aside while framing a problem. Forget everything you ever thought about the problem.
  • Talk to people. Before you think about the problem, talk to anyone who might be affected by the problem. To make this more concrete, here’s an example from the social arena. You’re a person who wants to start an organization or create a product to help people under the poverty line in Dorchester. Great. However, you’re not a person under the poverty line in Dorchester. You see the problem with a set of assumptions – for example, that most people under the poverty line are unemployed. This may or may not be true. It’s important to talk to the people you want to serve so you understand the problem from the perspective of those who are living it. If you want to build a new online tool for your tech company, talk to your customers. Understand the problem first by learning.
  • Spend most of your time thinking about the problem, not the solution. Listen to people. Let’s go back to the Dorchester idea. Don’t spend all of your time brainstorming your big idea. Think about the problem, find as many different perspectives as you can, and the solution will become clear. Basically, the more you understand the problem, the fewer bad (or ineffective) ideas you have to test.

In the working world, you will come across big problems and little problems. Design thinking can help you plan events, develop curricula, find your place on a team, and identify problems to solve.

Lindsey Sampson is a junior International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Find her Tweeting at @lindseygsampsonand blogging about travel & career at http://moreawesomerblog.com/.

Want to make a good first impression online?

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orange napkin

Clean up your Facebook account and update your Facebook privacy settings. 

Nina Davuluri, Miss America 2014 was the keynote speaker at my sorority’s 20 year conference. I had the great opportunity to hear her story this past weekend and something that really resonated with me during her speech was a story about this boy in middle school that made a comment about her mustache. She said, “ he can go on to be CEO of Apple or someone really important but I will always remember him as the guy that made me feel bad about my mustache”.  Wrapping up her story, she emphasized the importance of the kind of impression you leave on people.

Since we live in a world powered by social media, your Facebook page can often times be a first impression of you to your employer or colleagues. You’ll be surprise how many managers will try to see if you have any mutual friends and will even ask their friends about you or what you post on your profile.

In a previous blog posts from this series,  I focus a lot on how you can use social media to accelerate your personal brand.  In this particular post, I want to focus on how not paying attention to your privacy settings on your Facebook page can set your brand back a bit.

To clarify, this isn’t privacy settings when you accept a friend request from someone. These are the settings you should be familiar with when someone lands on the public portion of your page. . .

  1. Take advantage of the “View as” capability. This allows you to view your page as if you were someone else. ( add screenshots)
  2. Your Coverphoto is ALWAYS shared with the public. There is currently no option to change that setting although one is rumored to be in the works. With that being said, I highly recommend to opt for a safe conservative cover photo so that people don’t get the wrong idea about you. Safe photos would be a city or popular landscape.
  3. Your first profile picture is also always SHARED with public unless you choose the option to “only share with me”. Because of this, I recommend to choose a profile picture that best represents you and what you want you to be known for. Opt out on those partying pics that you thinks make you look cool right now. Be sure to go into your “profile pictures” album and change those settings to “share only with friends”.
  4. Edit your “who can look me up setting” which is under privacy and settings and change the “Do you want other search engines to link to your timeline?”. Click no. This will help minimize any Facebook activity that will show up after someone searches you on Google or any other search engine site.
  5. Clean up your posts and tagged pictures every few years!  What you posted when you first opened your account at 18 is going to be there when you’re job hunting at 21-22. Naturally, your 18 self isn’t representative of your 22 year old self.  As we’ve seen with celebrities and high profile cases, what someone has posted in the past can have repercussions that impact their employment and reputation.

Haylee is an Alumna from the College of Arts, Media and Design and a member of the Kappa Phi Lambda Sorority Inc, Northeastern Xi Chapter. She is currently a Marketing and Communications Manager at Ca Technologies, a social media personal branding coach, and a yogi residing in Medford, MA. Contact her at hayleethikeo@gmail.com or follow her on Twitter @hayleethikeo.

Look for Haylee’s posts every other Tuesday

Image source: SocialAppsHQ, Importance of first Facebook impression

New City, New Home – Feeling Confident Outside of Boston

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us-ny-topofrock
As someone who has never spent a co-op in Boston, I can say with certainty that there comes a point during your co-op, especially if you are far away from the comforts of Boston, where you feel at home in your new city or country. This point is something to celebrate – you now belong in this new place and that feeling will only improve your co-op experience. However, getting to this point can be challenging. I have one big piece of advice for anyone who is currently on co-op outside of Boston or for anyone who is considering one and it is this:
Explore the city.
I know that this seems like common sense. You’re probably saying, “Come on, I’m obviously going to explore my new city. Let’s hear some real advice.” I’m telling you, this is real advice. It is very easy to get stuck in a pattern where you just leave your apartment to go to work, especially when you are in a new city where you don’t know anyone and where you might not even speak the language. You probably won’t have a car, so learning the public transportation system can definitely seem daunting. I’ve been in Ecuador for three months and I still haven’t figured out how the bus system works, but that doesn’t stop me from trying!
If you’re in another country, you probably bought a guide book, so take that book and pick a new place each weekend to explore. Even if it’s just a restaurant ten minutes away from where you live, pick a night and just go. You’ll feel glad you left your room and you might even meet some new friends! On the weekends, pick a bus and see where it takes you – you might end up nowhere interesting or you might find the coolest thing in your city! Even if you are still in the US, look up what people say is interesting where you are and go check it out.
If you do this enough you will find that there comes a point where you start to recognize how to get around and where you are in your (no longer) new city. This point came for me about two weeks ago and I immediately felt a weight lifted off my shoulders. I felt like I belonged in Ecuador and once I felt like this, I no longer felt like the new girl at work. I became more confident in my work and in asking questions about bigger projects because I was confident in where I was.
All this being said, don’t ever put yourself in harm’s way just to get out of the house, but don’t be too scared of where you are to ever take a chance on your new city. You might just be surprised by the adventures you find and how they impact your overall experience on co-op!
Rose Leopold is a third-year political science major currently on international co-op with the U.S. Department of State at the U.S. Embassy in Quito, Ecuador. Prior to this experience, Rose spent her first co-op in the office of Senator Elizabeth Warren in Washington, D.C. Follow Rose’s adventures through her blog justsittingontopoftheworld.wordpress.com and on Instagram.

5 Alums, 5 Years Later: Christina Prignano

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Class of 2010

When I graduated from Northeastern in 2010, I had to take time off from two jobs so that I could actually attend my graduation ceremony. That time in my life was, in a word, overscheduled. One of the things I’m grateful for in hindsight was that I didn’t have time to really think about (and become terrified of) the fact that I was jumping into the real world. There are plenty of things that I wish I had known back then, so I was thrilled to take part in this series and offer whatever help I can.

Making an effort to seek out advice from people you admire is a great place to start after graduation, so in that spirit, the first idea I’ll offer up comes from a former colleague. Your social media presence is your resume. This was a favorite piece of advice from a stellar former social media editor at the Globe, and it’s a good one (not in every field, but in quite a lot of them). You’ve all heard the warnings about posting your party selfies and making inappropriate jokes online. But turn the warning on its head and it’s also true: You can show potential employers what you can do before you’ve even applied for a position.

This wasn’t possible ten years ago in the same way it is now, so take advantage of it. Post frequently about what you’re working on. Reach out and talk to people in your field. You have the ability to make an impression without having to go to those awkward networking events (although they help, too).

Writing in college is much different from writing at work. One of my favorite parts of graduating was saying goodbye to those 10+ page research papers. However, at many workplaces, documents are measured in words, not pages, and suddenly all of that effort you used to put into squeezing extra words into your sentences is working against you. Being able to get the most bang out of your paragraph is a great skill to have as you search for jobs. My advice for honing this skill is to continually rewrite your cover letters and other professional documents until you can get your point across in as few words as possible.

Not really sure where to start? It’s okay to have no idea what you want to do in life. Does it help to have a polished answer ready when your interviewer asks the dreaded “five year plan” question? Absolutely! But in my experience, not having a predetermined goal can also mean being open to unexpected opportunities and being eager to learn new skills.

I couldn’t even pick a major in college–I graduated with two. And so I found myself during college and immediately after graduation trying on a lot of hats. One of those hats, a part-time gig helping my former co-op launch a new website, turned into a full-time job that allowed me to try on even more hats. I jumped at whatever project came my way at that job, and eventually became the web editor of the organization’s publication, CommonWealth magazine. That role eventually led me to a job that I love today: a homepage producer for bostonglobe.com. My point is that if you find yourself looking for direction, it helps to jump at as many opportunities as you possibly can. Many absolutely won’t pan out, but some will.

Post-grad life can be stressful and challenging and not at all what you expected, but it’s really just the best. Congratulations on getting there, and don’t forget to enjoy it.

Christina Prignano is a homepage producer at bostonglobe.com and is a 2010 graduate of Northeastern. She majored in political science and journalism and sometimes wishes she still lived near Penguin Pizza. She can be reached on Twitter at @cprignano.

 

Beating the First Day Jitters: 5 Simple Steps to Overcoming Anxiety

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anxiety ecardIn my experience, starting a new job is rarely anything short of nerve wracking and overwhelming. Getting acclimated to a new environment is difficult and it’s hard to prepare yourself for such a transition, since it’s nearly impossible to know what to expect from your new job. Personally, leading up to my most recent first day of work, I was a mess. My confidence level waned as my uncertainty increased, and I was preoccupied with the thought that my arrival at the office would be a disaster. Somehow, I managed to pull myself together just in time, using these five tips, and rocked my first day on the job. Here’s how you can too:

  1.    Plan Ahead

Since much of your first day is likely to be a mystery until you get to the office, make a plan for the parts of the day that are in your hands. Set an alarm so that you have enough time to really wake up before you head out. Designate the amount of time you need to get ready, and decide exactly when you want to leave. Make sure that you give yourself ample time for your commute so that you’re not rushing to make it on time. Laying out plans ahead of time will give you the sense that more of your day is in your control.

  1.    Do Your Research

To prepare for an interview, it’s important to familiarize yourself with a company and what they do. Why not do the same for your first day? Even if you conducted previous research, look up your organization, your superiors and co-workers, and your own job description to refresh yourself before you arrive. Aside from looking at information concerning the company and the role that you will be playing in the workplace, make sure that you double check where your office is, the best way to get there, and roughly how long it will take you to get there. It can only help you!

  1.    Pump Yourself Up

Remember, starting a new job can be daunting, but it is also an amazing opportunity for growth and improvement. You will get so much out of this experience, and even if it ends up straying from your expectations, the skills that you will develop and refine will be an incredibly valuable asset to you in the future. Get excited to learn and get your hands dirty with something new!

  1.    Then Calm Yourself Down

Whether you’re excited to the point of shaking or you’re just plain nervous, chances are that you’ll need to take a step back and center yourself. Take some deep breaths, listen to music, stretch, take a hot shower, or sit down with a nice cup of coffee or tea before you head over. Your body and your brain will thank you for taking care of them later.

  1.    Fake It ‘Til You Make It

If all else fails and you’re still feeling the nerves, feign confidence. Even if you’re not completely convinced, walk into your office and give your co-workers the first impression that you are ready to take on the world. Being at ease in a new environment takes time, but acting comfortable will help you settle into your niche much faster than allowing yourself to be nervous would.

Joining a new office is a very intimidating experience, but don’t worry, if I can survive it, you can too. Now, follow these steps, get out there, and show them who’s boss!

Rosie Kay is a sophomore at Northeastern majoring in Communication Studies and minoring in Business Administration. She is currently on her first co-op at the Governor’s Press Office at the Massachusetts State House. This past summer, she completed a dialogue in London where she explored two of her interests: English history culture and documentary filmmaking. Email her at kay.r@husky.neu.edu with questions or comments.