First Impressions: Make the Most of your First Week

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Looking good? Check. source: blogs.fit.edu

Looking good? Check.
source: blogs.fit.edu

This article was written by Lindsey Sampson, a 3rd year international affairs student at NU as a regular student contributor for The Works. Follow her blog here and/or tweet her @lindseygsampson

The beginning of co-op is upon us, which means it’s time for new introductions. Your first week is going to be overwhelming; you will meet too many people, learn all about your new responsibilities, and you will feel like it can’t possibly only be 10am. Don’t worry – you got this. Here are a few tips to make the most of your first week.

Never eat alone: This is the time to introduce yourself. Get lunch with your department or go on a coffee run with the nice lady you just met from marketing—meet everyone you can. Your job will be much more enjoyable once you make some friends, so why put it off?

Don’t walk in like you own the place: During your first week, air on the side of saying less rather than saying too much. You will provide a fresh set of eyes for looking at systems and processes. Your suggestions will be valuable, but store up some ideas and save them for when you have a better idea of how the company works.

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Don’t call your boss Mary when her name is Kate: A magical amnesia wave washes over me during introductions. I am so focused on shaking hands and telling the other person my name that I completely forget to pay attention to their name. Immediately after they tell me, I have already long forgotten. Save yourself the embarrassment by paying attention during introductions. During your first week, avoid using the phrase, “I’m not good with names.” No one is good with names. The only way to get good at names is by consciously focusing during introductions. Sometimes you’ll blow it, but hey, it’s the first week.

Meet with your boss: Or better yet, your boss’s boss. Take time your first week to discuss the company’s goals and how you fit within the larger goals of the company. Knowing not only your responsibilities, but the responsibilities of those above will allow you to go above and beyond from the beginning in a noticeable and productive way. This puts you in a great position for a raise down the road (but let’s not get ahead of ourselves).

Most of all, don’t worry. Your first week and the many first impressions will be intimidating, but you will get used to everything and you will learn your co-worker’s name and, with no warning at all, you will get to your desk one morning and realize you’re thriving. It’s co-op season, so let’s make it happen.

Lindsey Sampson is a middler International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and/or tweet her @lindseygsampson.

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