New Series: 5 Alums, 5 Years Later

It’s insane to think that this time, five years ago, I was preparing for graduation from Northeastern University. A communications major with a duel concentration in public communication and organizational communication (back when it was still the College of Arts and Sciences), I was ready to tackle the uncertain world in front of me. Unfortunately for the class of 2009, as well as for those after, the economy had just taken a major turn for the worse, and the “Great Recession” was officially in full gear.

Clockwise: 2009 Commencement, Conference/visit to NU Seattle 2014, Red Sox playoff series game with my FIRST co-op supervisor 2014 (the perks of keeping in touch)

Clockwise: Northeastern University Commencement 2009, Conference/visit to NU Seattle 2014, Red Sox playoff series game with my FIRST co-op supervisor 2014 (the perks of keeping in touch)

If somebody were to tell me in 2009 that in 2014 I would be Assistant Director of NU Career Development and Social Media, I would have sarcastically chuckled and then reminded said person that “I was done with this place and didn’t plan on coming back any time soon”. Well, I certainly ate my words. I was officially re-enrolled as a student, yet again (yay double husky), within two years of earning my bachelors degree to work towards a master of science (which I swore I would NEVER do throughout college) in college student development and counseling. To top it all off, I now work here full time, serving students similar to myself, five years ago. My my, how the tables have turned.

A lot can happen in five years’ time, and there are lots of things I wish I had worried more about (cough-loans-cough) and others I wish I hadn’t harped on so much (I could have gone without that cut-off Abercrombie jean skirt). In the coming series, “5 Alums, 5 Years Later”, over the next five Mondays, you’ll meet five 2009 alums, all of which completed co-ops and who are working in very different industries. Hopefully their stories and words of wisdom inspire you to celebrate (even more so) what you are close to accomplishing, and embrace the sometimes, unpredictable world.

Some advice I can share, is to be flexible and open to new experiences (cliche, I know), take calculated risks, and know that it’s OK to change your mind about what you want to do. That said, be ready to do the work to make things happen. Unfortunately, there is no NEUCool for real life (so annoying right?) so work hard to establish and keep relationships with colleagues throughout your career and don’t be afraid to ask for advice and help- it pays off in the long run (trust me on this one).

Also, know that Career Development is available for you to use for the rest of your life- no joke. So if five years down the road (or one year, whatever) you’re interested in transitioning to something else, Northeastern is here to support you. Hopefully these fellow huskies inspire you to hit the ground running come May 2nd. Congrats!

Kelly Scott is Assistant Director of Career Development and Social Media Outreach at NU Career Development. A proud Gen Y and husky alum, she enjoys writing about workplace culture and social media. She also oversees The Works.

Landed a job, now what? Advice from the Pros

image source: http://www.rottenecards.com/card/224333/first-day-on-new-jobwhos-go

image source: http://www.rottenecards.com/card/224333/first-day-on-new-jobwhos-go

This post was written by Emily Brown, a regular contributor to The Works and a graduate student in the College Student Development and Counseling program at Northeastern University. She is also a Career Development Intern.

Starting a new job or co-op can be nerve-wracking.  It takes time to get a feel for the company culture and to figure out daily operations. As much as you want to find your place in a new company, you also want to make a good impression with new coworkers. I adapted some advice from LinkedIn’s “Best Advice” series and reached out to professionals for their tips on what will make someone a desired employee. While some might seem obvious, they are a good reminder that everything we do at work contributes to the reputation we build.

  • Everything you do and say reflects on the company.
  • Being positive, upbeat and responsive at all times reflects well on both the employee and the employer.
  • In a competitive work environment, going the extra mile, making the extra effort means all the difference in winning new work or retaining old clients.
  • Don’t rely so much on e-mail for communication especially if it is sensitive material.
  • Don’t text or e-mail in meetings – put your phone on silent mode and put it away.
  • Be prompt – show up on time (to work and to meetings).
  • Always make deadlines.
  • Don’t underestimate how important good writing skills are – it is a lost art!
  • Always proofread what you produce and/or ask a colleague with good grammar skills to look at it (especially if it is going to be widely circulated).
  • Don’t be afraid to say I don’t know – but also say you will find the answer.
  • Always follow through- even if it’s just to say you don’t have the answer yet.
  • Use proper grammar and speak correctly and clearly on the phone.
  • When adjourning from meetings, make sure you have a clear idea about what action items you are responsible for and what the deadlines associated with those items are.
  • Whatever you do, do it the best you can, even if it’s getting coffee.
  • Always bring a notepad when you meet with someone.
  • Make sure you communicate effectively about projects that are your responsibility. Be honest about what you have time to do.
  • Don’t leave the printer/copier jammed!
  • You can never redo a first impression.  First impressions include any time you work with someone for the first time even if you’ve been at that company for a while.
  • Listen twice as much as you speak.

After just a few weeks on the job, you’ll likely have your own tips to add to this list! When you become the pro, remember how it felt to be new and keep in mind that sharing little tips (especially on how to unjam that finicky copy machine) with new hires will be appreciated.

Emily Brown is a Career Development intern and a graduate student in Northeastern’s College Student Development and Counseling Program. She is a lifelong Bostonian interested in the integration of social media into the professional realm.  Contact her at e.brown@neu.edu.

A Shy Kid’s Guide to Networking

image source: http://www.spectra-events.com/2011/02/networking-tips-for-introverts/

image source: http://www.spectra-events.com/2011/02/networking-tips-for-introverts/

 

This guest post was written by Lana Cook, a PhD candidate in the English department at Northeastern University

I have always been on the shy side, an introvert in today’s parlance.  I grew up with my nose in a book.  Though I played with the neighborhood kids and joined team sports, I savored those solitary afternoons reading Anne of Green Gables for the twelfth time.  No small wonder that I went into an English Ph.D. program. So when this bookish introvert hears that ‘networking is the key to success,’ my first reaction is to cringe.  Palms begin to sweat, nightmarish visions of spilling my drink on a distinguished guest, fears of interrupting a conversation or appearing stupid cloud my mind with self-doubt.   But, then I remember what networking is at its basis:  the exchange of ideas with like-minded people.

Keeping that premise in mind, my confidence has grown as I now see the tangible benefits of meeting new people to circulate ideas, collaborate on projects, and discover new opportunities.  The risks are minimal, but the rewards can be potentially life changing.  Here are my tips for networking, even as an introvert:

Go To Events

This should be no-brainer, but it took me a while before I felt comfortable attending events alone. Be on the lookout for conferences, symposiums, workshops, speakers and panels to attend. Leave an impression by making an effort to speak to a few people. Sometimes I will make goals to meet a set number of people.  At first it may be forced, but eventually striking up conversations with strangers becomes natural.  People are attending these events for often the same reasons: to connect with others, build communities, and exchange ideas.

Stay For the Reception

Post-event receptions are a great time to network.  People are more relaxed and willing to meet new people over a few nibbles and beverages.  Don’t feel like you have to stay until the bitter end, and be careful not to overindulge on alcoholic drinks. You want to make an impression while you are there, but keep that impression positive and professional.

Be Yourself

This advice is a bit cliché, but is often repeated because it’s true.  Though sometimes we have to channel our inner confidence by ‘faking it until you make it,’ make sure that performance still rings true to who you are.  Posturing as someone you are not will not only feel disingenuous to others, but can also lead you astray of your own values.

Get Your “About You” Down

Though you should act naturally, it is also a good idea to have a basic script to share when people ask you about yourself.  Many recommend having an elevator speech, a quick five minute summary about yourself and your work. For myself, that’s a few sentences describing my educational background, current research project and career goals. This summary should not be robotic; think about it as a customizable personal statement that reflects your individual personality and makes you stand out from the sea of people in the room.  When speaking to people outside your field, avoid using disciplinary jargon and try to appeal to overlapping interests and shared goals.

image source: http://www.blogging4jobs.com/work/work-place-drama-gossip-problems/

image source: blogging4jobs.com

Watch the Gossip

It is easy to get caught up in office gossip, and some experts say that a little gossip can help us strengthen networks. But, when meeting new people, avoid talking negatively about others, your department or company.  It is a small world and word can travel quickly through our interconnected communities.  Negativity will reflect back on you. You want to be remembered for your positive energy, intelligence and ideas, not as the person who spreads malice or rumors.

Follow Up On New Contacts

After meeting new people, follow up by adding them on LinkedIn accompanied by a short personalized message.  If you meet them again in person, do not be discouraged if they do not remember your name or even face.  Reintroduce yourself and graciously refresh their memory about your last meeting. For example, if you met them at a conference recently, ask them what they thought about the keynote speaker or how their research is progressing.

Keep an Open Mind

I have learned that networking is a lifelong process with its own ebbs and flows of activity.  An open mind allows you to take in the flow of that experience rather than predetermining events and closing yourself off to others.  So, take a deep breath, put on a smile, and get your fabulous professional self out there.

Join me the first Thursday of the month here on The Works as I countdown to graduation.  My final post will reflect on my graduate school experience and the value of finishing up one chapter of your life before beginning another.

Lana Cook is a PhD candidate in the English department at Northeastern University. Her dissertation traces the development of the psychedelic aesthetic in mid-twentieth century American literature and film. Lana is a 2013-2014 graduate fellow at the Humanities Center.  She received her bachelors of arts at University of New Hampshire.  You can follow her on Twitter @lanacook or Linkedin. You can view her portfolio at LanaCook.net.

4 Professional Skills You Can Gain By Blogging

Check out my own blog if you're into that kind of thing, http://moreawesomerblog.com/.

Check out my own blog if you’re into that kind of thing, http://moreawesomerblog.com/.

This article was written by Lindsey Sampson, a 3rd year international affairs student at NU as a regular student contributor for The Works.

When you tell someone you have a blog, the conversation can go down a lot of different paths:

“Oh, so you spill your guts on the Internet and I should run far away from you?” Nope.

“Oh, so you get a bunch of free stuff?” Not really. I mean, sometimes. But usually not.

“Oh… that’s nice.”

Opinions on blogging run the gamut, but over the past few years, blogging has established itself as an effective tool for engaging in public conversations. People in every industry use it to communicate ideas, and young professionals can establish valuable career skills by taking on some WordPress time.

Establishing (And Keeping) A Strong Network: As a blogger, some of your greatest collaborators are other bloggers. Having these connections can be mutually beneficial for support, advice, and everyday inspiration. Keeping up with a network can be a challenge, so this skill will serve you well in the professional world.

Hint: Keep a contacts spreadsheet of other professionals in your space. Make sure you have their name, email address, blog URL, twitter handle, (and a few notes about them if you tend to forget things) so you can send out some support or an article they might find interesting.

Supporting Peers: In the professional world, you rarely go it alone. There are always people along the way to support you, and you can foster those relationships by supporting. The blogging world is no different, and bloggers are involved in that on a micro level by sharing content from other bloggers. It benefits your readers by providing them with interesting content, and it allows you to provide some love to other bloggers.

Hint: Every day or every other day, share content written by other professionals in your industry on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.

Marketing: Even if you have the best stories in the world, or the most creative DIY projects known to man, it’s not going to make an impact if no one can see it. Learning to market effectively and appropriately is crucial for bloggers. Bloggers can use Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and Google+ like champs without breaking a sweat, a useful skill for establishing yourself as a thought leader in your industry.

Hint: Hootsuite – it’s a big deal. Using the free version, you can post to all of your social media channels at once, schedule future posts, and save yourself lots of time.

Listening & Reacting: Being hooked up to the Internet makes you realize that people stop caring about things quickly. Really quickly. No one wants to talk about Pharrell’s hat at the Grammy’s anymore (even though we should never stop talking about that). As a blogger it’s important to listen to the Internet – what’s trending on Twitter, what people are sharing on Facebook. Being receptive to new trends is a great skill for the workplace, ensuring that your ideas are always timely and innovative.

Hint: Set up a Google Alert for your niche. If you are a travel blogger focused on luxury trips with a low price tag, set up a Google Alert for “cheap travel” or “traveling on a budget.”  If you are a marketing professional focused on fashion brands, set up a Google Alert for “social media fashion brands.” At the end of every week (or every day, depending on your preference), Google will send you an up-to-date list of what influencers in your niche are talking about. This keeps your content relevant and helps you avoid stale topics.

Blogging allows you to create a network of people who can challenge you creatively and intellectually by sharing ideas online. This exchange can keep you sharp and in-tune with current events, and can boost your skills in the workplace.

Lindsey Sampson is a middler International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and tweet her @lindseygsampson.

10 Ways for CPS Students to Take Advantage of Campus Resources

image source: https://twitter.com/NortheasternCPS

image source: https://twitter.com/NortheasternCPS

This guest post was written by Tricia Dowd, a Career Development Assistant at NU Career Development.

  1. Come to Career Development: Career Development is open to all CPS students for all of our services. Whether you want to come to walk-ins for a quick question, make a full one hour counseling appointment, or attend one of our many workshops we’re here to help you in your job and internship search.
  2. Go on Co-op: CPS has a co-op program just like the other colleges at Northeastern. You can learn how to get started on your search here. Going on co-op is an amazing opportunity to apply the skills you are learning in your degree program and help build your professional experience.
  3. Explore Tutoring Services: Northeastern offers several tutoring services that are open to all NU students, including the Writing Center and International Student Tutoring. In addition, CPS also has a unique smarthinking program that offers online tutoring services to all CPS students.
  4. Use the Global Student Success Services: CPS offers international student services to students. Services range from ESL Tutoring and Pronunciation Workshops to the Volunteer Team Leader program. This is a great opportunity for international CPS students to get more comfortable with their English skills and become more confident in their abilities while doing so!
  5. Go to Student Enrichment Sessions: The Office of Academic and Student Support Services offers students a number of workshops every quarter that help build academic, professional, and personal skills. The topics vary (we present an Introduction to Career Services workshop!) and each will help you learn about a different aspect of student and campus life. Best of all- if you attend enough events you will get a free gift at the end of the series!
  6. Join Student Groups: The Center of Student Involvement is open to all Northeastern students, including CPS students. There are over 150 different student groups on campus. Joining a student group is a great experience to put on your resume to show potential employers you’re involved, and is also a great way to meet new friends!
  7. Use your printer balance: All undergraduate and graduate students at Northeastern get $120 worth of free printing at any NU Information Technology managed Computer Lab. This balance does not roll over and will be lost if you don’t use it. You can check out this page to learn more about how to redeem and use your balance.
  8. Get a discounted T Pass: Northeastern offers all students the opportunity to buy a discounted MBTA monthly pass via the NUPAY website. The discount is around 10%, but is a great way to save if you use the T on a regular basis.
  9. Get checked out at University Health and Counseling: If you enrolled in Northeastern’s health plan than you have access to our health services. You can use both the medical and counseling services-there are even evening and Saturday hours to accommodate your busy schedule.
  10. Go to the Gym: If you paid the recreation fee, then you have access to the Marino Center. Go get your sweat on! There are cardio and strength training machines and you can also utilize the Cabot Center and Badger & Rosen Squashbusters Center. For a small additional fee, you can also utilize the awesome group fitness classes Marino offers.

Tricia Dowd is a Career Development Assistant at NU Career Development, and graduated from Northeastern with a Master’s in Higher Education Administration in September. She is interested in helping students gain practical experiences to complement what they’re learning in the classroom. You can reach her at p.dowd@neu.edu.

How To Find a Co-op While You’re Abroad

LindseyEdinburgh

This article was written by Lindsey Sampson, a 3rd year international affairs student at NU as a regular student contributor for The Works.

Northeastern students are everywhere. Because of the number of international opportunities available, it’s not uncommon for a student to apply for co-op 3,000 miles away from Boston. I applied for my second co-op from my living room in Edinburgh, Scotland, where I studied abroad in the fall. While applying for co-op abroad presents its own unique set of challenges, you should not feel overwhelmed – it is possible to find a co-op you love while studying abroad as long as you are well-prepared.

Find a quiet place with reliable wi-fi. Generally speaking, study abroad housing is not known for its reliable wi-fi. Find another place on campus that is quiet and has excellent wi-fi. Sometimes the library has small rooms available to reserve, or you can ask a professor to use his or her office. While co-op interviewers are understanding of external circumstances, a Skype call inhibited by a slow internet connection is not the best way to make a good impression.

Be on call. You’re studying abroad, so evenings and weekends will probably be spent on grand adventures around your host country. However, because you are so far away, you need to be vigilant about checking your email every time you have wi-fi, especially during co-op crunch time. If you’re on the road, stop somewhere with reliable wi-fi at least once a day. Pro tip: Starbucks always has good wi-fi. Always. Make sure you are available during working hours stateside and make a good first impression by responding to emails quickly.

Be proactive. When a potential employer offers you an interview, make sure they have all of the materials they need to assess you as a candidate. Because you won’t be in the same room with them, geared up with extra copies of your resume and references, be sure to have them virtually on-hand; either keep important co-op application documents on your desktop or send them to your interviewers beforehand.

Remember, at the end of the day, that you are qualified. Co-op employers are interested in you as a candidate — what you are doing and where you are going. One interviewer gave me suggestions for restaurants in Edinburgh. Some employers are wary about hiring a co-op student they have not met in-person, but attentiveness and preparedness can ease their mind and earn you one amazing co-op.

Lindsey Sampson is a middler International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and tweet her @lindseygsampson.

Tips for the International Job Search from the International Guru

photo from http://www.visassimply.com/work-abroad

photo from http://www.visassimply.com/work-abroad

This guest post was written by Ellen Zold Goldman, Associate Director of Career Development and lover of all things international.

It’s officially International Month on the blog and a great time to think about escaping our snowy winter weather. If you have the travel bug, maybe working overseas is in your future. Check out these tips for creating your own work abroad experience in this first blog post focused on international topics.

Tips for the International Job Search

  • Learn about cultures you’re interested in. Don’t spend lots of time finding a job in a place you can’t warm up to…Develop friendships with international students. Make sure you like the sound of the language and the food.  A great resource is Transitions Abroad’s Living Abroad section.
  • Join Global Jobs Network, Expat & Global Worker, and other groups on LinkedIn. Join groups related both to your career interests and countries you’re interested in working. Follow the weekly digest and reach out to folks whose discussions interest to you.
  • Check out overseas Fellowships: That’s money you don’t have to pay back which underwrites your experience.
  • Use Going Global, by logging into Husky Career Link for great resources.
  • Network, Network, Network! With your co-op employers, your international student friend’s uncle, hair dresser, professors, Study Abroad adviser… with ANYONE who will listen to you. While you’re on co-op,  see if they have a location in a city you’re interested in. Remember speaking the language enables you to function professionally.
  • Join list-servs like Dev-X. List-servs are usually related to professional associations. It’s where they get the word out about jobs.
  • Considering Teaching Abroad? Check out the JET (Japan) program, CIEE, Search Associates, and Dave’s ESL Café, but buyer beware. Do your research to find a credible program.
  • The Peace Corps, may be a great option for you. We have the most amazing Peace Corps Employer-in-Residence. Make an appointment with her and stay tuned for her blog.
  • Connect with panelists at our events. Career Development has a program called Build an International Career on March 27th and Global Careers Forum in the fall. Network with the folks on the panel.
  • Consider going from local to international—work here first and get selected for an international assignment or transferred overseas.  Case in point: My friend worked in Kenya with International Rescue Committee after working for them in Boston. Another friend’s starting the finance department at his company’s new international location. Also check out Foreign Firms Operating in the U.S. through the library or amazon.com.
  • Go on an International Co-op, study abroad, or a dialogue. While you’re there do information interviews. I’ve done a lot of info interviews and usually folks love to share their advice. Remember- the ASK is NOT for a job, just for advice. Do your research ahead of time and know what you want to ask.
  • Many companies have joint ventures with local companies overseas. Some Consulates/Embassies have the list in their business section.
  • Go overseas to your target country for a vacation or visit and check out some of the “Meet Ups” (always go to public places—now I feel like I’m channeling my Mom). Connect with others while you’re there and network. Check out American Firms Operating in Foreign Countries through www.uniworldbp.com or through the library.  If you have a work permit, or EEU citizenship, you can always sign up to temp…but know it’s really hard. It’s a job to get a job, and even more so in another country—especially if you’re not a native speaker. Our international students here at Northeastern understand that very well as they’re going through it themselves in the US.
  • Check out the Advanced People Search on LinkedIn.com. You can type in Northeastern University for the school, click on your target country, and find alum overseas, or do info interviews with NU alum who have worked in your target country but who are in the Boston area.
  • Here are some additional sites. Just remember that while being on line can feel efficient, it’s rarely effective without networking. There are meta sites- like Monster with their world-wide gateway and local sites that specialize in specific countries. Remember to use your Northeastern Network, Husky Nation, and Husky Career Link. Check out: Riley Guide, Overseas Digest, 4 International Careers & Jobs, and InternationalJobs.com. There are also professionally-focused sites that offer jobs internationally, themed by type of position; for example: Econ-Jobs.com, and others.

Want to learn more?  Make an appointment with Career Development! Be sure to check out our International Job Guide. Also check out this article How to FInd Your First Paid Job Overseas.

Ellen Zold Goldman is Associate Director at Career Development. She’s worked on a short-term gig at a non-profit in Greece, has coordinated an international co-op exchange program in Australia, directed study abroad at another university, loves international students, and as you can probably tell, she has a passion for anything international.

 

Making Positive Impressions

This guest post was written by Katie McCune, a Career Development Assistant at Northeastern University Career Development. She’s also a Career Assistant at MIT.

Not too long ago, I was getting ready for my next big adventure: moving cross-country from my home-state of Colorado to New England. We all experience starting something completely new at different phases of our life whether it’s first coming to college, going on a new co-op, getting our first job, or even moving cross-country. With each new change, there are also opportunities to meet new people. There are a lot of great ways you can make good personal and professional impressions, but here’s what meeting a lot of new people has reminded me:

A smile goes a long way.

source: www.quickmeme.com

source: www.quickmeme.com

My “big move” was for school, so like many of you when I first arrived, I was meeting peers, professors, and administrative staff as well people through clubs and sports teams. The people who I initially developed connections with were the ones that smiled. Yep, simple as that, they smiled.  Research has consistently shown that body language is a major factor in how we interpret somebody’s words. With one nearly effortless action, you can demonstrate to your new co-op boss (or anyone else) that you are friendly, confident, and invested in them.

Always follow through.

Think about a time when you were just getting to know somebody, set up plans with them and then they flaked out. How did this affect your opinion of them? I’m going to go out on a limb here and guess you didn’t end up becoming besties–It feels crappy when somebody misses a meeting with you or doesn’t get in touch when they say they will. Why? Because it can signal that we’re not a priority in those people’s lives.

Before you agree to something, whether it’s sending an email, showing up for a 9am meeting, or taking on a big project, be sure that you can actually do it. By doing what you say you’re going to do, you will demonstrate that you are reliable, organized, and respectful—all qualities that are helpful in any professional or personal setting.

Be a good listener.

A lot of times when we think about meeting new people, we focus on what we are going to say. For example, if you’ve practiced for an interview, I bet you went over your answers, but did you think about how you were going to show the employer that you were listening? While presentation skills are important, listening skills can be just as important, if not more. By asking good questions, remembering what people say, and actively listening, you can make the other person feel valued and demonstrate that you’re present and ready to learn.

source: http://wallippo.com

source: http://wallippo.com

All interactions reinforce or undermine the first impression.

You’ve probably heard that first impressions matter—and they totally do! But it’s important to remember that the first time you meet somebody isn’t the only time you’re making an impression with them. If you forgot to smile this time, do it next time. If you followed through this time, that doesn’t mean that it’s not important to do the same next time.

It can be intimidating to make new connections especially in a professional setting, but remember that it’s just like all of your other interactions. Be the person that you would want to meet, and you’ll be golden! Share with us, what are other things people have done to make positive impressions on you?

Katie is a Career Development Assistant at NU with a background in sociology. A teacher at heart, she loves leading workshops–in addition to the career workshops, she’d gladly teach you how to hula-hoop, how to organize your house/office/desk, or how millennials can make great employees. Email her at k.mccune@neu.edu.

10 Things I DO and DON’T like to see on Resumes

This post was written by Emily Brown, a regular contributor to The Works and a graduate student in the College Student Development and Counseling program at Northeastern University. She is also a Career Development Intern.

source: http://careerservices.umhb.edu/resume-tips

source: http://careerservices.umhb.edu/resume-tips

  1. DO make your name the biggest thing on the page. Hiring managers shouldn’t have to search for it among your contact info.
  2. DON’T label your phone number and email. The reader will understand that the 10 digit number under your name is probably your phone number and that sk8rgrrrrl@4lyfe.com is your email address (just kidding. DO make sure your email address is professional!)
  3. DO include your GPA if it’s 3.0 or higher. Round it to TWO decimal places.
  4. DON’T write “References available upon request” on your resume. Employers will assume that you will provide references when they ask. You can use that extra space to include something awesome about yourself like the fact that you speak three languages.
  5. DO include academic projects. As college students, it’s not always possible to have as much professional experience as you might like in your target industry. Academic projects are a good way to show a potential employer that you have applied skills learned in the classroom in a practical way. Bonus points if those particular skills are in the job description.
  6. DON’T use a template. Microsoft Word has resume templates available and, though tempting, you should avoid them. Hiring managers read hundreds of resumes and will very quickly recognize one of these templates. They might assume that very little effort went into the resume even if that is not the case. Take the time to customize your format a bit and make sure it’s easy to read. Aim for a balance of text and white space.
  7. DO include results when possible. Quantifying what you accomplished helps create a fuller picture for the reader. For example, if you “researched and proposed more efficient operating procedures,” include that those proposals were accepted by your company and that the procedures are still in use.
  8. DON’T begin your bullet points with adverbs. I’m sure that you “Successfully collaborated with team members,” but it will serve you better to begin with strong verbs and show your success. For example, “Collaborated with team of 5 to plan and execute fundraising event resulting in proceeds of $2,500” (see how I snuck results in there?). Similarly, vary the verbs you use to keep the reader engaged and to showcase your various skills.
  9. DO limit yourself to one page. Recruiters read resumes very quickly and you can’t guarantee that they’ll make it to the second page. It’s ok if you don’t include every job you’ve ever had. Focus on the ones most relevant to the job you’re applying for.
  10. DON’T rely only on spell check. Spell check will sometimes miss errors because they are in fact words, but not the word you’re intending to use (form, from; through, thorough; the list goes on). Take the time to ask another real live human to proofread for you.

Emily Brown is a Career Development intern and a graduate student in Northeastern’s College Student Development and Counseling Program. She is a lifelong Bostonian interested in the integration of social media into the professional realm.  Contact her at e.brown@neu.edu.

Finding an Internship Without Prior Experience

source: collegefashion.net

source: collegefashion.net

This guest post was written by Sam Carkin, a sophomore studying Marketing and Interactive Media.

The “real world” can be intimidating; especially when you’re just starting out. Sure, that first job as a house painter or bus boy is great for earning some money and learning to work with others, but I am assuming if you came to Northeastern you are looking to do something within your major. Northeastern is special in the sense that co-op allows you to work within your major prior to graduation, but what if you want some experience for your résumé before applying to that first co-op job? A summer internship right after your freshman year is an awesome way to go, and something I had the opportunity to do last summer with integrated marketing firm GY&K. Below, is some strategies I used for landing that internship where I gained experience in the marketing and advertising field before my first co-op (which will begin in July).

1. Network, network, network:  I visited a family friend who worked at a huge marketing agency called Arnold Worldwide. He had been in the industry a while and agreed to introduce me to an employee at GY&K, the person who ultimately offered me the internship. Ask your parents, ask your friends, find SOMEONE that works in your industry of choice and ask them if they know anyone that you might be able to talk to or work for.

2. Informational Interviews are kEY: OK, so I had been introduced to this person from GY&K, but what now? An informational interview is a perfect way to demonstrate professionalism and interest, while also learning a great deal from someone who knows the industry well. If it goes well, you have a better chance of possibly working for the person you speak with.

3. Have confidence: Going in to speak with an industry professional can be extremely intimidating; however, setting up informational interviews shows that you are genuinely interested in what that person does and see them as a successful individual in their field. They will be just as excited to tell you what they know as you are to learn, and it should be treated as a casual conversation during which you can make a great first impression.

4. Do not be afraid to ask: If your interview went well, at the end feel free to ask if that professional’s company has any opportunities for you to gain experience, or if they know of any other companies that might have these opportunities. It will allow you to possibly find that internship position, or continue to grow your network.

Sam Carkin is currently in his sophomore year at Northeastern University. He is a dual major of Business Administration-Marketing and Interactive Media and will be going on his first co-op in July. Feel free to contact him at carkin.s@husky.neu.edu with any questions related to the blog post or his experiences.