How to Spend Your Summer

Finals are over! For those of you that are graduating, congratulations! You made it!

pexels-photo-65977For those of you that aren’t and are facing a four-month summer, here are some tips to make it through in a productive way.

  1. Find an internship. The benefit of having such a long summer is that you have room for a significant work experience – if you use the entire four months, it could even count for a co-op. A lot of already-established internships last for only one or two months, so you can split your summer between work experience and relaxation.
  2. Set up an independent project. If you can’t find an internship, try to come up with your own project! Hone in on an area that you want to further study and contact people that might serve as valuable sources of knowledge. If you’re staying around campus, Snell would be a great place to work as most of the student population will not be around.
  3. Research. Keep an eye out for research opportunities with past professors, PhD candidates, and department heads. Some research projects experience a lull over the summer if most of the work relies on students, but others thrive since research can be the main focus with classes temporarily on hold.
  4. See the world! If you have always longed to travel, now is your time. The academic year can be hectic and there is not much time to go abroad during the scheduled breaks, so the summer is a perfect time to travel to the other side of the world where it would take a week just to get over jetlag. Do some research, talk to friends about the best places to go, and make sure you have the finances available to travel.
  5. Go on a dialogue. Along the same lines of seeing the world, a dialogue would be a great opportunity to travel while doing concrete work and earning course credit at the same time. Take a look at Northeastern’s dialogue website at http://www.northeastern.edu/geo/dialogue/. All of the applications for this summer are closed, but look around for ones you might want to pursue in the summers ahead.
  6. Relax. The school semester is a stressful time so take advantage of the sun and lack of constant pressure to breathe for a moment. Go home, see family, and make memories. Refresh yourself and renew your scholarly spirit for the upcoming academic year.

 

 

Spring Cleaning for Your Social Media

This post was authored by Ria Kalinowski

Spring is finally here! Flowers are blooming, students are graduating, and it’s time to dust off your social media accounts. Presenting your best self while job searching is extremely important. You need to make sure your social media presence is helping you do that. Here are some tips for cleaning up and improving your LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook profiles.Ria 1

LinkedIn

  • Update your photo! Make sure your picture is recent and professional.
  • Boost your Search Engine Optimization! Add industry specific keywords to your headline and summary. Adding relevant words increases the chance that your profile comes up when employers and recruiters search for potential employees.
  • Grow your network by joining groups! You can learn about what people in your industry are talking about and contribute to the discussion. You can also send direct messages to people who are members of the groups you are a part of.

Twitter

  • Improve your bio by including hashtags and keywords. You only have 160 characters!ria 2
  • Pin a tweet! You can select one of your tweets to stay at the top of your twitter updates. Choose a professional tweet that relates to your industry.
  • Update your list of people and companies to follow. Use your target list of companies and this article to focus the content you see on your twitter timeline.

Facebook

  • Weed through and delete or untag yourself from any unprofessional photos. You don’t want to lose a job opportunity because of inappropriate pictures on your profile!
  • Clean out your contacts: remove any friends that you are no longer in contact with or assign them to groups such as Acquaintances to limit their access to your profile.
  • Take control of your privacy! Go to your Privacy Settings and limit the sections of your profile that are public. In the Timeline & Tagging Settings you can also limit who can post to your timeline and be able to review any posts before they appear on your timeline!ria 3

Women Leaders Making a Difference

This post was authored by Anu Singh

GOTHow do you make a difference? It’s a question that betrays a sense of idealism, a preoccupation with contributing something worthwhile, something that touches others and improves their experience. It’s a question that becomes more pressing as time goes on and a part of your life comes to a close. What are you leaving behind, what did you do that was positive and helpful?

When I was approached by a close friend about putting on a conference bringing successful, women to campus to talk to students about professional life, I thought it would be a small affair. Something a bit low-key, especially since it was the first time that it was being held. Now it’s turned into two-day event with fifteen amazing speakers, two hundred expected attendees, and a large team of students all working to make it happen. The momentum that took the vision to reality was astounding and it couldn’t have been possible without the help of so many people in the Northeastern community.

Moving from college life to professional life is a change the majority of us have to make. This change evokes many questions, thoughts and feelings: the apprehension, the anticipation, the intimidating realization that you’ll have to learn a whole new set of rules, get used to a new normal. How do you balance your work life with your personal life? How do you network and get to know people if it’s not something that comes naturally to you?

These are questions many college students ask when they’re taking the first steps in their careers, and some of the questions we’ll tackle at our conference. You learn by doing, but the advice and wisdom of people who’ve done it all before – and succeeded – is invaluable. Therefore, the aim of all of our work is to bring a resource to students – especially women – who would benefit from the guidance of inspiring people. It will be a chance to hear valuable advice, practice networking and ask your own questions about transitioning from a college life to a professional one.

Please join us for the first inaugural Northeastern Women’s Leadership Conference on April 1st and 2nd. Tickets are on sale myNEU. For more information, please visit our website.

Anu Singh is a Class of 2016 Computer Science and Biology major and a founding executive board member of the NU Women’s Leadership Network.