That end of the interview dreaded question…. Do you have any questions for us??

Interview Questions

It would be easy to take this question literally, and think to yourself, I just want to get out of this interview, so you say “no, I don’t have any questions for you.”

Bad idea! You want to leave the employer with the impression you are the one for the job and that requires you to ask more questions!

Why does the interviewer ask this question?  To find out if you can step back from the long hours of interviewing and ask some broad processing questions. In a nutshell, the interviewer wants to know how you think.

This is a great opportunity for you to not only show them that you are a big picture thinker but you’ll also find out if your need to tell them anything more about yourself!

So, what are some good questions you can ask?

  1. Tell me more about the culture of the office or company? Or how would you describe the culture of the office or company? (You want to make sure this is the right fit for you too.)
  1. What are the opportunities for professional development? How do you develop your employees to take on more responsibilities?? (You are exploring advancement opportunities.)
  1. I read that your company is moving in X direction, or just made X acquisition; can you tell me more about that and how it might impact the company both short and long-term? (You’re showing them that you have done your research on the company.)
  1. What do you see as the greatest challenges for your company over the next 5 years? (Again, you want to learn more about the company.)
  1. Are there any special projects coming up that you’d want me to work on if I got the job? (You’re showing your interest in the job.)

And finally….

  1. Is there anything you need to know about me that will help you to make a decision?
  1. What happens next in this process? (You want to know the timing of their decision.)

Sharri Harmel works in career development at Northeastern University, acting as the liaison to the College of Engineering. She loves international travel, creative thinkers and good books, all with equal passion. Tweet at her about the article @careercoachNU!

How to Make the Most Out of Your Summer

DeathtoStock_Wired8

With summer classes mid-way through and spring co-ops left with about a month, college students’ minds are inevitably shifted to a long-overdue summer vacation. After a semester long of hard work, we all deserve a nice break, where we enjoy the warmth of sunshine and good company with friends — after all, post-graduation this will all be a luxury for young working professionals. But while it is important to have fun and wind down, college students should also be taking advantage of a summer when they have fewer obligations with schoolwork to make the most out of it.

Here are a few possibilities you can try to keep yourself busy this summer:

  1. Find a Summer Internship/Job

It’s a no-brainer that summer internships ensure career success after graduation. After all, isn’t what Northeastern’s co-op program is for, to make sure that Huskies graduate with ample work experience to get ahead in the game? Regardless of your co-op experience, an extra summer will give your future employers an impression that you are driven, ambitious and willing to learn. Plus, who wouldn’t want extra cash even if it is part-time? Or even if it is just a summer job, be it in a coffee shop, restaurant or a country club, the skills and experience that you will learn to be crucial to building your character and financial success.

  1. Travel

When scrolling through your Facebook newsfeed or Instagram pictures, it is not unusual to see pictures of friends traveling for fun, studying abroad, and doing a dialogue. After all, “life is a book and those who don’t travel, read only one page.” Moreover, travel is crucial for us to understand and make sense of the world around us. The experience, history, culture and the people we encounter will help us discover ourselves and appreciate people different from us. If you are really serious about it, many travel agencies and companies with great deals, such as EF College Break, TravelZoo, and Expedia might be good sources to check out. Moreover, with the vast amount of Northeastern alumni and friends across the globe, it is easy to get connected or even crash at their places so you can save money here and there.

  1. Learn a new skill

Have you ever get passed over for a co-op because you didn’t know Adobe Photoshop or excel? While soft skills such as communication and writing are important in the workplace, hard skills are equally important in helping your application stand out. Consider spending this summer taking classes on acquiring or polishing a new skill (or even mastering a foreign language). From publishing, coding, building a website, to learning Adobe Photoshop, endless online courses and tutorials are at your fingertips. All you need is just a willingness to learn!

And of course, don’t forget to relax and wind down, because you deserve it! Just remember: Work Hard, Play Hard.

Scarlett Ho is a third year International Affairs and Political Science major with a minor in Law and Public Policy. During fall 2014, she studied abroad in Belgium where she interned at the European Parliament. The summer prior to that, she interned for Senator Warren on Capitol Hill, and previously Congressman Lynch in Massachusetts. She can be reached at ho.sc@husky.neu.edu.

Our 5 Favorite (fun) Job Search and Career Sites

job thing rachel

With graduation over and summer beginning, it’s time for you recent grads (if you haven’t already) to begin turning your thoughts to getting that full-time job. Alumni looking for a new job and for rising seniors trying to get a jumpstart on the job search should also pay attention.  Here are the top five entertaining and informative job search blogs that can be a great resource for those embarking on the full-time job search.

  • The Muse: The Muse is a fantastic website that not only offers a blog that helps answer any career-related and job search questions, but also offers a robust job board, and a chance to look inside company offices before applying. Be sure to check out the free online classes section that can help you to learn new job skills that will enhance your resume.
  • Ask A Manager: The writer of the blog, Alison Greene, is a former chief of staff and consultant, and has successfully written a few well-received job search books. Alison’s pithy, hilariously sarcastic and blunt opinions about oddities and awkward occurrences in the workplace or on the job search are extremely entertaining to read and can give you great information as to how to navigate these situations should they happen to you.
  • Careerealism: Both job seekers and employers frequent Careerealism–it not only offers a blog with great career advice, but offers an area for employers to showcase their brand, share their story and discover great talent. By subscribing to Careerealism, job seekers can also access LinkedIn lab tutorials, Interview Prep tools, checklists and assessments.
  • Brazen Careerist: Brazen Careerist is a career networking site for ambitious young professionals, as it powers real-time online events for organizations around the world. Their interactive platform, Brazen Connect, is used by companies, professional associations and universities to expand how they recruit and connect with potential employees.  They also have a pretty great blog related to the job search that job seekers can subscribe to as well.
  • Undercover Recruiter: This blog is focused solely on career development processes and the job search. Topics for blog posts include: career management, interview tips, job search, tips and tricks from recruiters, resume & CV writing, and how to use social media in the job search.

So pick you poison and use these helpful sites to get cracking on that job search!

Ashley LoBue is an Assistant Director at Northeastern Career Development.  A Boston College graduate, Ashley has over 4 years of experience working in higher education and is a proponent for international and experiential education.  Ashley also enjoys binge-watching HGTV and aspires to be like the Property Brothers, Drew and Jonathan, as a possible secondary career. 

Why Should I Do an Internship?

Source: http://byuinternships.org

Source: http://byuinternships.org

This guest post was written by Tricia Dowd, a Career Development Assistant at NU Career Development, and a recent graduate from Northeastern’s Higher Education Administration program where she earned her Master’s degree this past September.

As Northeastern students, the value of experiential learning and work experience before graduation is probably already something you’re well aware of. Most of you will probably go on at least one co-op during your time here. So why do an internship?

Actually, one of the best reasons to do an internship is co-op. As co-ops are becoming more popular, they are also becoming more competitive. This is especially true for students who are applying for their first co-op. Having an internship experience already on your resume not only makes you more competitive, it also makes you more prepared. You will already have work experience in your field, and you’ll have a better idea of what to expect when the first day of co-op rolls around.

Using an internship experience to get ahead for co-op is great if you already know what you want to do, but it is also great if you don’t know what you want to do! Instead of waiting to pick a major (or decide to stay in one) to get work experience through co-op, getting work experience through an internship is an easy way to try out a major or a career without committing to a program or a company for a full six months. Not sure you want to be a Policy Analyst? Try a summer internship to explore the field before committing yourself to it for six months and potentially using one of your co-ops for something you aren’t sure you want to do. We recommend finding an internship the summer after your first year, but it’s never too late to get more work experience or explore a different field.

Internships are also a great way for students who are unable to go on co-op to get work experience. The primary differences between an internship and a co-op are that internships are (usually) unpaid and (usually) shorter in length and more flexible. Therefore, if you’re not able to take a semester off from your major, an internship is a way to get work experience around your schedule, or for a shorter time during the summer when you don’t have other commitments. As someone who regularly meets with students in the middle of a job search, I can honestly tell you that work experience is one of the most important things you could leave college with. I have yet to meet a student who told me that she or he regretted going on an internship!

Finally, internships can also be a way for you to get your foot in the door at a company that does not currently offer a co-op position. Instead of waiting until after graduation to try to break into one of these companies, why not apply for an internship now? Give your dream company a chance to see how hard of a worker you can be! The connections and institutional knowledge you’ll get out of the experience will be a huge asset to a future application at that company.

So how exactly do you find an internship? Check out my previous post for a summary of the top three methods, attend some of our workshops on the topic, or hop right on HuskyCareerLink.

Tricia Dowd is a Career Development Assistant at NEU Career Development, and graduated from Northeastern with a Master’s in Higher Education Administration in September. She is interested in helping students gain practical experiences to complement what they’re learning in the classroom. You can reach her at p.dowd@neu.edu

Want to make a good first impression online?

orange napkin

Clean up your Facebook account and update your Facebook privacy settings. 

Nina Davuluri, Miss America 2014 was the keynote speaker at my sorority’s 20 year conference. I had the great opportunity to hear her story this past weekend and something that really resonated with me during her speech was a story about this boy in middle school that made a comment about her mustache. She said, “ he can go on to be CEO of Apple or someone really important but I will always remember him as the guy that made me feel bad about my mustache”.  Wrapping up her story, she emphasized the importance of the kind of impression you leave on people.

Since we live in a world powered by social media, your Facebook page can often times be a first impression of you to your employer or colleagues. You’ll be surprise how many managers will try to see if you have any mutual friends and will even ask their friends about you or what you post on your profile.

In a previous blog posts from this series,  I focus a lot on how you can use social media to accelerate your personal brand.  In this particular post, I want to focus on how not paying attention to your privacy settings on your Facebook page can set your brand back a bit.

To clarify, this isn’t privacy settings when you accept a friend request from someone. These are the settings you should be familiar with when someone lands on the public portion of your page. . .

  1. Take advantage of the “View as” capability. This allows you to view your page as if you were someone else. ( add screenshots)
  2. Your Coverphoto is ALWAYS shared with the public. There is currently no option to change that setting although one is rumored to be in the works. With that being said, I highly recommend to opt for a safe conservative cover photo so that people don’t get the wrong idea about you. Safe photos would be a city or popular landscape.
  3. Your first profile picture is also always SHARED with public unless you choose the option to “only share with me”. Because of this, I recommend to choose a profile picture that best represents you and what you want you to be known for. Opt out on those partying pics that you thinks make you look cool right now. Be sure to go into your “profile pictures” album and change those settings to “share only with friends”.
  4. Edit your “who can look me up setting” which is under privacy and settings and change the “Do you want other search engines to link to your timeline?”. Click no. This will help minimize any Facebook activity that will show up after someone searches you on Google or any other search engine site.
  5. Clean up your posts and tagged pictures every few years!  What you posted when you first opened your account at 18 is going to be there when you’re job hunting at 21-22. Naturally, your 18 self isn’t representative of your 22 year old self.  As we’ve seen with celebrities and high profile cases, what someone has posted in the past can have repercussions that impact their employment and reputation.

Haylee is an Alumna from the College of Arts, Media and Design and a member of the Kappa Phi Lambda Sorority Inc, Northeastern Xi Chapter. She is currently a Marketing and Communications Manager at Ca Technologies, a social media personal branding coach, and a yogi residing in Medford, MA. Contact her at hayleethikeo@gmail.com or follow her on Twitter @hayleethikeo.

Look for Haylee’s posts every other Tuesday

Image source: SocialAppsHQ, Importance of first Facebook impression

The Career Paths Your Advisor Forgot About

questionThe field of physician assistant (PA) studies has been cited among the fastest-growing careers (38% in the next ten years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics) and was named by Forbes as the “#1 Best Master’s Degree for Jobs” in 2012.  But when I sought help in planning my path to becoming a PA, my university’s health professions adviser told me, “We’ll learn about this together.”  There can’t be a framework in place for every possible career, but figuring out the path doesn’t have to be difficult.

Find others with similar plans.  The first real companion I found was a friend from high school who was applying to become a physical therapist.  We were both used to having to defend our career choice; each of us had the experience of people asking, “But why don’t you want to be a doctor?”  With that off the table, we were able to get into the details of what we were excited about, what we were unsure about, and why we were going into our chosen fields.  A supportive environment makes the rough parts a little smoother.

Reach out.  Really, really reach out.  It may be hard to find people to shadow or meet with.  I was able to shadow one of the PAs who worked with my aunt, but after that, I didn’t know how to find others.  The shadowing program set up through my university had plenty of alumni who were doctors, but not a single PA.  Desperate for more contact, I emailed the state physician assistant association and asked for help.  Not long after, a representative emailed me a list of PAs who would be willing to take me on for a day.  I attended a program for emergency medical technicians to shadow emergency room physicians, and when the doctor found out I was applying to PA school, he found me one of his PA colleagues to work with instead.  Take every opportunity, and do everything you can to create them.

Don’t be afraid of nontraditional resources.  There was no organization for pre-PA students at my university, so I went to a few meetings of the fledgling pre-nursing group to figure out where I could take my prerequisite courses. There wasn’t a lot of information relevant to me, but there was enough to get me started.  And just as there are study guides for every possible standardized test, there are “how to get into school” books for nearly every career.  Working from those books and scanning over message boards ultimately got me all the information I needed to put together a successful application.

Mariah Swiech Henderson is a first-year student in Northeastern’s Physician Assistant Studies program. She can be reached at henderson.mar@husky.neu.edu with any questions about working in healthcare and applying to/attending PA school.

LGBT Job Search Tips

Job searching in general can be its own challenge for any student and let’s face it, deciding how “out” you want to be during your search and in your career can be another variable to throw in the mix that you may not have previously considered.  On the other hand, you may be thinking about identity a lot in the workplace, but are unsure of the best way to address it during your job search. Never fear – Career Development is here! Here are a few things to start thinking about:

How does the company celebrate LGBTQ employees?

Photo source: https://twitter.com/pridenu

Photo source: https://twitter.com/pridenu

Working for an organization that supports you not just as an employee but as a person (identities included) is paramount for some graduates today. Does the company you want to work for have an affinity group or resource group that is active and valued? This is a great way to take a temperature of how supportive a workplace can be. These groups allow for positive celebration and inclusion of identities, and act as a way for employees to voice their opinions within a business. It’s also a great way to meet other likeminded employees who identify in the LGBT community.

How does the company protect LGBTQ employees?

While celebration is important, having appropriate rights is equally critical! Refer to the organizations antidiscrimination policies to see whether or not there is specific language for LGBT individuals. How about benefits packages? Are partners covered under insurance plans? What about hormone treatment for medical coverage?

Still having trouble finding information?

If you are unsure of where a workplace stands on LGBT rights, find some current employees and pick their brains. A good old fashioned informational interview is always a simple approach! If you aren’t comfortable talking about LGBT specific topics in this situation, try asking more general questions like “What kind of diversity initiatives does your company support?”  There is a plethora of online resources that can be found on our website. Consider getting involved with NU Pride, the student organization Northeastern for LGBT students.  Don’t forget about making appointments with our staff. A majority of our counselors are Safe Zone certified and would be happy to work with you to begin your job search right!

Mike Ariale specializes in disability employment, self- advocacy, disclosure and accommodation strategies for the workplace. You can schedule an appointment with him through MyNEU or by calling the front desk at 617-373-2430.

First Impressions, Or How Job Interviews Are Like Tinder

tinder gifSwipe right or swipe left? Most users of the dating site Tinder take mere seconds to decide whether to connect with a potential partner or to banish that person to the reject pile.  Would you be surprised to learn that it doesn’t take a potential employer much longer than that to form a strong impression of a job candidate? Being invited to interview for a job means that you and just a few other candidates were chosen, possibly out of hundreds of other applicants, to make your case in person.  Given this chance, it’s important for your in-person performance to be as flawless as you can make it. And that begins, and unfortunately sometimes ends, with your first impression.

gross cher reactionIn one study, 33% of hiring managers surveyed said that they knew within the first 90 seconds of an interview whether or not they would hire a candidate. In the same study, conducted by Monster.com, 65% of bosses said that appearance could be a deciding factor when two of the candidates being interviewed are otherwise very similar.  Appearance includes not only clothing but hairstyle, hygiene, makeup and jewelry.

What you wear must fit well and be clean and in good repair, including your shoes. Select and examine your outfit before the interview so if cleaning or mending are in order, you will have time to do it.  If you’re planning to wear something new, make sure you remove the tags and stitching in the pockets or pleats. Be conservative with makeup unless the job you’re after requires big floppy shoes and a fake red nose.  Likewise, jewelry should be unobtrusive except if the norm for your industry says otherwise. Regardless of industry, skip the cologne or aftershave; you have no way of knowing whether any of your interviewers have allergies or sensitivities. If you smoke, you may not be aware of the tobacco smell clinging to your coat, clothing or hair, but your interviewer will be, and most likely will not be impressed.

Knowing what to wear can be tricky. Your goal is to dress like you belong in the organization where you’re interviewing, preferably on the more formal side. For consulting, financial services and legal positions, that means wearing a suit for both women and men.  In other fields, it is up to you to do a little sleuthing to find out what is the norm. You may look crisp and professional wearing your suit, but if you’re meeting with people in a much more casual environment, they could take one look at you and decide that you don’t understand their culture. Dressing up may not score in your favor if it isn’t what other employees do, since an interview is largely about determining fit.

When you walk into the interviewer’s office, be aware of your posture. Convey a confident attitude by standing up straight and walking purposefully. A natural-looking smile is also important, as are a firm handshake, a heartfelt “Pleased to meet you” and good eye contact.  Practice these things with a friend until they are second nature.

If this seems like a lot of work for the first 90 seconds of your interview, don’t forget that without that great first impression – swipe left! – your well-prepared interview talking points may fall on deaf ears.

Author Susan Loffredo began counseling NU students well before the iPhone was invented and owns socks that are older than the class of 2015. Email her at s.loffredo@neu.edu.

Image Source: Tinder Gif; Cher Gif

Procrastinating Your Job Search? Tips To Get to Work, So You Can Work

You return to your laptop with a Dunkin’ Donuts coffee in hand determined to finally complete your resume. You just saw a job opening that looks pretty close to perfect, but every time you sit down to write your resume, you find something just a little more pressing to do. Three hours later, you’ve arranged your closet by color, talked to your grandmother, favorite aunt, and high school BFF, and bought two books for next semester at half price, but still haven’t worked on your resume. Job search procrastination has struck again.

Does this kind of procrastination sound familiar? It can be frustrating and easy to beat yourself up when you know that you should be progressing in your job search and instead keep putting it off for another day. If you find yourself stuck in your job search because of procrastination, follow these steps to get back on a path to success.

1. Break down your goals into concrete and manageable tasks

Sometimes we procrastinate because our goals are too overwhelming. If you are feeling overwhelmed, take each big goal and make a list of all of the smaller tasks that go into completing the goal. Then tackle each of these “mini-tasks” one by one. These smaller tasks often feel more do-able. For example, instead of setting out to write your resume, your mini-task might be to write the bullet points for one co-op position, outline your computer skills, or even just create the resume heading. If you work consistently on these smaller tasks, they will add up, and soon you will achieve your goal.

2. Set individual deadlines for each mini-task.

Unlike classwork, the tasks associated with looking for a job often do not have clear deadlines. It can be easy to procrastinate when a professor isn’t going to dock your grade for each day that you don’t begin to network, but as time elapses, opportunities will pass you by. Outwit this common trap by setting your own deadlines. Once you have broken your goals into mini-tasks, assign a deadline to each item. Put these deadlines on your calendar and treat them with respect.

3. Schedule an appointment with yourself to work on each task.

While you have your calendar open, schedule times to work on each of your mini-tasks. Without a time set aside, there is always some other work that can take precedence. But by assigning a specific time and treating the time as an appointment, you are more likely to stick to your plan.

4. Acknowledge stress and find positive ways to cope

For many of us, job searching is stressful. Writing your resume, polishing your LinkedIn profile, researching a company—all of these activities can stir up anxiety. It is natural to want to avoid tasks that create distress and so job searching is often put off for activities that are more pleasurable—or at least less painful! Recognizing that you may be putting off your job search because of the stress that it provokes is the first step in overcoming this challenge. Next, think about ways that you have dealt with stress successfully in the past and draw on these same techniques to help you succeed in your job search. These stress-relieving activities are different for each person, but whether it is going for a run or talking to a friend, these behaviors can help you through your job search. Finally, some people also find it helpful to reward themselves for each completed task. Set yourself up for success by scheduling fun activities as a treat after you finish a challenging task in your job search.

5. Let go of perfectionism

A common cause of procrastinating is perfectionism. Of course, you want all of your job materials to be error-free and completed to the best of your abilities. But when your drive for excellence is making it difficult to even get started, it is time to step back and reboot by lowering your standards. Most written materials of job searching, such as resumes and cover letters, go through numerous drafts. So that first draft of your cover letter—it doesn’t need to be the most brilliant cover letter ever written—it just needs to be a rough draft. The same holds true for other parts of your job search. If you are not reaching out for informational interviews because you want the interaction to proceed perfectly and you are not sure if it will, take a deep breath and do it anyway. Have that slightly awkward first conversation. It will only get easier with practice and soon you will be networking like a pro.

6. Ask for help

You don’t need to do this alone— Career Development is here to help. Come during walk-ins hours, attend a workshop or schedule an appointment using myNEU or by calling 617-373-2430. Procrastination during your job search is a common pitfall, but it doesn’t need to be yours. Take advantage of these tips and the opportunities offered by Career Development and before you know it, you will be well on your way to success.

Kate Basch is a Career Counselor Assistant in Career Development at Northeastern University. With a Master’s degree in Expressive Therapies and Mental Health Counseling from Lesley University, she enjoys helping people discover and obtain work that aligns with their strengths and values. You can reach Kate at https://www.linkedin.com/in/katebasch​.

Start Early and Set Yourself Apart: An Interview With an NU Alum

Jay Lu received his BSBA in Accounting and Marketing in May 2014 and MS in Accounting this past August, 2014. During his time at NU, he held numerous positions both on and off campus and internationally. Jay successfully completed three separate co-ops at large multinational companies with experience in audit and assurance, tax and operations. Jay recently completed the CPA exam and his currently working in audit and assurance at a CPA firm. In his spare time, he enjoys volunteering, reading and sports. To learn more about his professional background- check out his LinkedIn profile.

When did you first come to the Career Development office?

It was for the Career Fair, freshmen year.

Why go to a career fair? Most freshmen would wait until later for this.

I had no risk.  I didn’t feel pressured.  I didn’t need anything out of it.  I wanted the practice of the experience. It’s kind of like a festival, with everyone dressed up.  It can be a fun event when there isn’t pressure.  I didn’t have a suit back then.  But I went in and just talked with a couple of recruiters.  At this point I didn’t have a resume.  But later on I learned how to create a resume, and how to make a good impression.

What else did you do early on?

Early on I went for an appointment about career direction.  I wasn’t sure how to explore my options.  Through my career counselor I learned about informational interviews.  In fact I even did one for an RA position.  Ended up getting the job because I was more prepared and had someone recommending me from the info interview.  I also got into LinkedIn early on.

From these early experiences, what do you recommend that students do in their 1st or 2nd year?

Don’t think that just because it’s your first year that you have all the time in the world.  You’ll be graduating in a flash.  When you start early, you’ll be ahead for when you need it. When there is less pressure, when you don’t need a job yet, get advice then.

How can students have an impact on potential employers?

A lot of employers want to know if you want them.  It’s not just about your skills.  To stand out, make a good impression early on with them. Be genuinely interested in the field, which should be a natural feeling if you chose a major you are passionate about. Have people warm up to you, and your personal brand early on, even if you might not be fully certain what that is yet.  The idea here is to build your network before you need it.  Things get a lot more competitive, when you are a senior.  Everyone is going after these connections.  By starting early you can set yourself apart. They will be impressed that you are being so proactive.  Another point is that there is more leeway if you mess up, employers will more likely overlook this when you are younger.

How can students make more employer connections?

Go to career services and alumni events.  Do these while you are still on campus.  Once you graduate, it’s harder to fit these in.  Also, the further along you get in college, there are more expectations put on you (from recruiters, parents, peers), compared with when you are in your 1st or 2nd year.

What can you gain from this early networking?

When you chat with recruiters, they might open you up to other career paths that you didn’t know about or hadn’t thought of.  The more exposure and more conversations, the better.  You can never know what you’re going to do, exactly, but you can learn more early on to help.  It’s great if you can find out sooner what you might value in a career, while you can still make changes to your academic or co-op path.  You might save yourself time and heartache.  The more people you talk to, the more confident you’ll be with your choices.  You want to find those people that are in your potential career path, since they’ve already been there and you can learn from them.  Would you want to be in their shoes? Talking to them gives you a chance to find out.

During your senior year, how did you approach your job search?

I didn’t have too much trouble.  I had already been to 3 or 4 career fairs, and I already had quite a few connections from co-ops and various other events. If you have done everything early on, at this point it should be a relaxing year. At my last career fair, I received an interview call in less than an hour after the fair ended.

How do you maintain your network?

Always follow up after any professional encounter. Send a thank-you note after meeting someone at a campus event or any professional encounter.  For example, after attending the Global Careers Forum I sent an email to one of the guest speakers saying thank you.  I didn’t ask for anything in that moment. It might come later. Northeastern makes sending thank-you letters after co-op interviews almost religious, I try to use this same mindset. I always like to think of the story of one interviewee’s thank-you letter being a PowerPoint that showed how he would tackle a current problem facing the company. Now that’s hitting the ground running!

Is there anything you wished you’d known sooner?

Don’t take your professors for granted.  They can be some of the best resources.  They are there for you, and they want to help you.  I made a habit of seeing my professors every semester, even just to chat with them (while you are in the course and sometimes even after).  One professor sent me details about an internship that had been sent in by an alum.  I was given the details about this opportunity because the professor knew me well, and he had confidence in me. In addition, if I had more time, I would’ve joined more organizations that were related to my major.

Anyone you stay in touch with?

One of my accounting professors I went to see a lot.  He had great industry advice about how to get started, he recommended good organizations, and even suggested events to attend.  I sent follow up messages to thank him and to let him know I attended the events he had mentioned, I also shared some information that I thought would be useful for his current students.  It’s important to let people know that you followed their advice, and if you have something you can share, then include it.

What’s your finally advice to students, especially when it comes to networking?

Start early and don’t stop.