Review your Networking

Give me a first and last name and you can be found in the internet. Whether it’s an article from a high school newspaper, your LinkedIn, or a social media profile, it’s out there. And being wary of it is crucial.

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I’ll google myself, and you should too. I know that my social media comes up, because no one shares the same name as me (oh the joy). I’m aware that this is available to a potential employer. I’ve gotten those LinkedIn notifications that someone from a job I applied for looked at my Linkedin, which means they probably did a quick google search of me.

This being said, besides just making sure my LinkedIn is up-to-date with employment, job descriptions, and certifications, I make sure my social media is too. We live in a world where we are all connected and since it’s out there, I’m taking advantage of it. I list my employment on Facebook, have a professional profile picture, and make sure there’s no discrepancies between all. Maybe I’m neurotic and this is only me, but having a professional outlook on social media is necessary, in my opinion. Continue to share what you normally would, it’s a part of who you are. I’m not going to not share a running article or an EMS article I found interesting; it’s a part of who I am and will probably come in an interview. And that’s cool.

Working with Staffing Firms: A Guide for Grads

This post was authored by Logan Spillane, Recruiter, LABUR Consultingpexels-photo-29594 The staffing industry can get a bad rap among job seekers-from making false promises, to not communicating with candidates. While certain criticisms may hold true with some firms, it is not by any means an indictment of the entire industry as a whole. In fact, a good agency can help job seekers discover a great job and open new doors on their way to the career they have always wanted.

In order to navigate a saturated and sometimes overwhelming field of companies, it is helpful to have some tips to make the process easier.

  • Should you pay a fee?

Never. There is no guarantee that paying an agency a fee will get you a job.

  • How do I know when I have a good recruiter?

I believe there are a couple of different signs of a good recruiter. First and foremost, a good recruiter will keep your interests and goals in mind, and won’t just send you the next job they have. Rather, they will send you positions that align with what you are looking to do, and help your career. Second, a good recruiter will be transparent, honest and give you the information that you, as a candidate deserve to know. One of the biggest reasons people give me for not wanting to work with an agency is the fact that they have had an experience where a firm has been dishonest and misled them. A good recruiter won’t feed you misinformation on things like the pay rate, contract status, actual job responsibilities, etc., and will give you the true facts on each opportunity.

  • How should I vet recruiters to find the right one?

My biggest piece of advice on vetting recruiters to find the right one is to talk to and meet with many of them, and see who can provide you with the best service not just in terms of a job, but also in personalizing your experience, getting to know you as a person, and being upfront and honest. It will take some time, but it will allow you to find the right recruiter and will help ensure that you do not end up getting burned. See what each company has to offer, ask a lot of questions (ex. on the agency, the areas they focus on, the jobs they see, the process, etc.) and pick the one or two recruiters that will focus on you not only as a candidate, but as a person because at the end of the day it’s your career. LinkedIn recommendations, GlassDoor, and other career websites can also serve as a valuable tool in finding a good recruiter. Finally, asking friends and family about firms they would recommend can be a valuable asset in finding a good recruiter.

  • How do I identify recruiters?

Northeastern’s career website has a good list to go off to start with. Additionally, running a Google search on staffing firms in your area can also be another route. However, I would recommend taking 10 minutes to read through each company’s website to see what they are all about and how they can best serve you and your career.  Also, be sure to check out his/her LinkedIn profile—look for recommendations, and also for anyone you know who knows that recruiter and consider reaching out to obtain any feedback you can…or maybe even a soft reach out from your common contact to the recruiter of interest. The recruiter can then also have that informal recommendation from someone they know about you!

  • Will I receive help preparing for the interview? Help with Salary Negotiation?

A good agency will always help prep candidates for every interview they go on-whether they are just out of school or an experienced professional. In many cases, they may also help prep you for the salary negotiation. For someone just out of school, it is especially helpful to have someone providing them with tips and assistance on their way to nailing the interview and getting the job!

LABUR Consulting is a staff augmentation firm based in Boston that specializes in the tech and finance industries. You can learn more about us at http://labur.com/

 

How to Spend Your Summer

Finals are over! For those of you that are graduating, congratulations! You made it!

pexels-photo-65977For those of you that aren’t and are facing a four-month summer, here are some tips to make it through in a productive way.

  1. Find an internship. The benefit of having such a long summer is that you have room for a significant work experience – if you use the entire four months, it could even count for a co-op. A lot of already-established internships last for only one or two months, so you can split your summer between work experience and relaxation.
  2. Set up an independent project. If you can’t find an internship, try to come up with your own project! Hone in on an area that you want to further study and contact people that might serve as valuable sources of knowledge. If you’re staying around campus, Snell would be a great place to work as most of the student population will not be around.
  3. Research. Keep an eye out for research opportunities with past professors, PhD candidates, and department heads. Some research projects experience a lull over the summer if most of the work relies on students, but others thrive since research can be the main focus with classes temporarily on hold.
  4. See the world! If you have always longed to travel, now is your time. The academic year can be hectic and there is not much time to go abroad during the scheduled breaks, so the summer is a perfect time to travel to the other side of the world where it would take a week just to get over jetlag. Do some research, talk to friends about the best places to go, and make sure you have the finances available to travel.
  5. Go on a dialogue. Along the same lines of seeing the world, a dialogue would be a great opportunity to travel while doing concrete work and earning course credit at the same time. Take a look at Northeastern’s dialogue website at http://www.northeastern.edu/geo/dialogue/. All of the applications for this summer are closed, but look around for ones you might want to pursue in the summers ahead.
  6. Relax. The school semester is a stressful time so take advantage of the sun and lack of constant pressure to breathe for a moment. Go home, see family, and make memories. Refresh yourself and renew your scholarly spirit for the upcoming academic year.