Working with Staffing Firms: A Guide for Grads

This post was authored by Logan Spillane, Recruiter, LABUR Consultingpexels-photo-29594 The staffing industry can get a bad rap among job seekers-from making false promises, to not communicating with candidates. While certain criticisms may hold true with some firms, it is not by any means an indictment of the entire industry as a whole. In fact, a good agency can help job seekers discover a great job and open new doors on their way to the career they have always wanted.

In order to navigate a saturated and sometimes overwhelming field of companies, it is helpful to have some tips to make the process easier.

  • Should you pay a fee?

Never. There is no guarantee that paying an agency a fee will get you a job.

  • How do I know when I have a good recruiter?

I believe there are a couple of different signs of a good recruiter. First and foremost, a good recruiter will keep your interests and goals in mind, and won’t just send you the next job they have. Rather, they will send you positions that align with what you are looking to do, and help your career. Second, a good recruiter will be transparent, honest and give you the information that you, as a candidate deserve to know. One of the biggest reasons people give me for not wanting to work with an agency is the fact that they have had an experience where a firm has been dishonest and misled them. A good recruiter won’t feed you misinformation on things like the pay rate, contract status, actual job responsibilities, etc., and will give you the true facts on each opportunity.

  • How should I vet recruiters to find the right one?

My biggest piece of advice on vetting recruiters to find the right one is to talk to and meet with many of them, and see who can provide you with the best service not just in terms of a job, but also in personalizing your experience, getting to know you as a person, and being upfront and honest. It will take some time, but it will allow you to find the right recruiter and will help ensure that you do not end up getting burned. See what each company has to offer, ask a lot of questions (ex. on the agency, the areas they focus on, the jobs they see, the process, etc.) and pick the one or two recruiters that will focus on you not only as a candidate, but as a person because at the end of the day it’s your career. LinkedIn recommendations, GlassDoor, and other career websites can also serve as a valuable tool in finding a good recruiter. Finally, asking friends and family about firms they would recommend can be a valuable asset in finding a good recruiter.

  • How do I identify recruiters?

Northeastern’s career website has a good list to go off to start with. Additionally, running a Google search on staffing firms in your area can also be another route. However, I would recommend taking 10 minutes to read through each company’s website to see what they are all about and how they can best serve you and your career.  Also, be sure to check out his/her LinkedIn profile—look for recommendations, and also for anyone you know who knows that recruiter and consider reaching out to obtain any feedback you can…or maybe even a soft reach out from your common contact to the recruiter of interest. The recruiter can then also have that informal recommendation from someone they know about you!

  • Will I receive help preparing for the interview? Help with Salary Negotiation?

A good agency will always help prep candidates for every interview they go on-whether they are just out of school or an experienced professional. In many cases, they may also help prep you for the salary negotiation. For someone just out of school, it is especially helpful to have someone providing them with tips and assistance on their way to nailing the interview and getting the job!

LABUR Consulting is a staff augmentation firm based in Boston that specializes in the tech and finance industries. You can learn more about us at http://labur.com/

 

Walk, Don’t Run.

wood-nature-person-walkingWhen interviewing for a job, it can be so nerve-wracking. You’re being interviewed, but remember that an interview is two-sided. You have to be the right fit for the company as well as the company being the right fit for you in this time of your life. It’s stressful, having to decide if this is right for you at this time. So take it one step at a time, walking. Do not rush the process because being sure about an opportunity is essential in finding the right job.

There are times where a job is great, but the company is not a good fit for you. Believing in the company and their mission is extremely important. You are searching for the place you will call home for 40 hours a week – make sure the company culture is just as great as the job itself!

As crazy as it sounds, getting a job offer does not mean you have to say yes. It’s so tempting to say yes to the first opportunity, and often times, people do. However, this can lead to passing up a better choice that might be down the line for you.

If you do decide to say no and hold out for a better opportunity, expressing your gratitude the employer who has offered you a job is essential. You might want to work there in the future, so keeping a good rep is key. Be sure to thank the employer for the consideration and briefly explain that you are simply choosing to pursue another opportunity. Say no, but be nice about it.

So that being said, walk, don’t run. Don’t jump at an opportunity if you know something else better may be waiting out there for you. It might be a better job, a better location, a better company culture, or something else. Make it the best fit for you.

Rock that Interview.

art of interviewing

You’re on the job hunt and have sent out resumes upon resumes upon resumes and you finally get that phone call offering you an interview with a potential employer. First, congrats! Getting an interview is the next step and that deserves appreciation. Second, here comes the time to shine, to rock that interview.

Interviews aren’t exactly about showing that you’re perfect; they’re about sharing with another person what you’ve done, what you want to do, and how you can fit into their workplace culture.

Think of some answers beforehand. We all know the typical interview question: Tell me about yourself, tell me about a time you faced a challenge and how you overcame it, describe a past project to me, etc. I could go on. Chances are you’ll get asked these at the majority of your interviews so it’s good to have some answers thought out beforehand. Don’t stage what you are going to say, just have a general idea. You’ll relax and allow yourself to focus on simply answering the question instead of scrambling to find an answer.

Dress to impress. It’s time to pull out a nice outfit. Dress up slightly more than you would for a typical work day. It shows the interviewer(s) that you care about the interview and respect their company. Go for something more business professional than business casual. A little tip: try to make sure you wear something you’ve worn before, at least once. The last thing you want is to find out a new shirt is itchy or just plain uncomfortable when you’re waiting for the interview to begin.

Be personable. You are a human. Your interviewer is a human. Therefore, be a person. You don’t have to build yourself up and only talk about your successes. Companies want to see that you have faced challenges in the workplace and want to know how you troubleshot them. Be yourself. Don’t try to change the way you speak, just answer their questions, ask questions, and let your natural light shine through.

Hopefully these tips help you out with any upcoming interviews! Personally, I think the last one is the most important because it’ll show the company who you are because they want to make sure you will be a great fit for their workplace culture. There’s a wealth more of tips on this blog and online, so be sure to check those out if you need more. And remember, you got this.