Procrastinating Your Job Search? Tips To Get to Work, So You Can Work

You return to your laptop with a Dunkin’ Donuts coffee in hand determined to finally complete your resume. You just saw a job opening that looks pretty close to perfect, but every time you sit down to write your resume, you find something just a little more pressing to do. Three hours later, you’ve arranged your closet by color, talked to your grandmother, favorite aunt, and high school BFF, and bought two books for next semester at half price, but still haven’t worked on your resume. Job search procrastination has struck again.

Does this kind of procrastination sound familiar? It can be frustrating and easy to beat yourself up when you know that you should be progressing in your job search and instead keep putting it off for another day. If you find yourself stuck in your job search because of procrastination, follow these steps to get back on a path to success.

1. Break down your goals into concrete and manageable tasks

Sometimes we procrastinate because our goals are too overwhelming. If you are feeling overwhelmed, take each big goal and make a list of all of the smaller tasks that go into completing the goal. Then tackle each of these “mini-tasks” one by one. These smaller tasks often feel more do-able. For example, instead of setting out to write your resume, your mini-task might be to write the bullet points for one co-op position, outline your computer skills, or even just create the resume heading. If you work consistently on these smaller tasks, they will add up, and soon you will achieve your goal.

2. Set individual deadlines for each mini-task.

Unlike classwork, the tasks associated with looking for a job often do not have clear deadlines. It can be easy to procrastinate when a professor isn’t going to dock your grade for each day that you don’t begin to network, but as time elapses, opportunities will pass you by. Outwit this common trap by setting your own deadlines. Once you have broken your goals into mini-tasks, assign a deadline to each item. Put these deadlines on your calendar and treat them with respect.

3. Schedule an appointment with yourself to work on each task.

While you have your calendar open, schedule times to work on each of your mini-tasks. Without a time set aside, there is always some other work that can take precedence. But by assigning a specific time and treating the time as an appointment, you are more likely to stick to your plan.

4. Acknowledge stress and find positive ways to cope

For many of us, job searching is stressful. Writing your resume, polishing your LinkedIn profile, researching a company—all of these activities can stir up anxiety. It is natural to want to avoid tasks that create distress and so job searching is often put off for activities that are more pleasurable—or at least less painful! Recognizing that you may be putting off your job search because of the stress that it provokes is the first step in overcoming this challenge. Next, think about ways that you have dealt with stress successfully in the past and draw on these same techniques to help you succeed in your job search. These stress-relieving activities are different for each person, but whether it is going for a run or talking to a friend, these behaviors can help you through your job search. Finally, some people also find it helpful to reward themselves for each completed task. Set yourself up for success by scheduling fun activities as a treat after you finish a challenging task in your job search.

5. Let go of perfectionism

A common cause of procrastinating is perfectionism. Of course, you want all of your job materials to be error-free and completed to the best of your abilities. But when your drive for excellence is making it difficult to even get started, it is time to step back and reboot by lowering your standards. Most written materials of job searching, such as resumes and cover letters, go through numerous drafts. So that first draft of your cover letter—it doesn’t need to be the most brilliant cover letter ever written—it just needs to be a rough draft. The same holds true for other parts of your job search. If you are not reaching out for informational interviews because you want the interaction to proceed perfectly and you are not sure if it will, take a deep breath and do it anyway. Have that slightly awkward first conversation. It will only get easier with practice and soon you will be networking like a pro.

6. Ask for help

You don’t need to do this alone— Career Development is here to help. Come during walk-ins hours, attend a workshop or schedule an appointment using myNEU or by calling 617-373-2430. Procrastination during your job search is a common pitfall, but it doesn’t need to be yours. Take advantage of these tips and the opportunities offered by Career Development and before you know it, you will be well on your way to success.

Kate Basch is a Career Counselor Assistant in Career Development at Northeastern University. With a Master’s degree in Expressive Therapies and Mental Health Counseling from Lesley University, she enjoys helping people discover and obtain work that aligns with their strengths and values. You can reach Kate at​.

How Can I Really Improve My English Skills During College?

eng pic

This guest post was written by Maria Martin, an international graduate student currently on co-op.

When I fist came to Boston, about three years ago, I started to study English and I spent a considerably part of my time and money in writing, listening, speaking and grammar classes. I don’t regret what I did. But after being here for a while, I realized that the best way to learn English is through real experience with Americans. Here are a few tips that will help you to improve your overall English skills without spending tons of extra money and time.

1. Talk to your professors.

Do not be afraid to ask as many questions as you can during classes (what’s the worst thing that can happen? Nothing!). Many international students do not raise their hands because they do not have the words to say what they are thinking. Don’t be afraid. If you already got into college, then you are capable to find the words even if you make mistakes.

2. Volunteer.

I love to volunteer. There is nothing as gratifying as helping others. There are a lot of positive aspects of volunteering; first: you are helping someone, second: you can use it in your resume (for those who have no experience at all), third: it helps to improve your English skills. Boston has plenty of organizations you can work with. Google them, ask your advisor for help or connect with the Center for Community Service on campus. For example: I am volunteering as a Mentor in the Big Sister Association of Boston.

3. Mentors.

In my first year in Boston I found a really good person who mentored me for a few months while transitioning from my English course into my Master’s program. We spent hours and hours talking about a variety of subjects, and even thought it was difficult for me to understand, I tried my best to keep track of our conversations. Now, I can understand my friend perfectly and I can talk as if it were my own language. I encourage you to find a mentor in your area of study. There are a lot of professional organizations that offer mentorship programs, one being the Boston Product Management Association. Speaking with your mentor not only will help you to improve your English skills but also your career and networking.

4. Wise commuting.

Most of our commuting time is spent on our phone texting, listening music, etc. but do you think that this is worth your time? Why don’t we listen to NPR (National Public Radio) or read one of your favorite books in English? We need to realize that we have a barrier: language. So we should do everything we can to reach our goal. And if your goal is just going back to your home country as soon as you graduate, it will be pretty good to have a resume with a working professional proficiency level of English. On the other hand, if you are planning to get a job, well spoken English is a must.

5. Follow your instincts.

Most professionals recommend avoiding talking in your native language in order to perfect your English, but I believe that is a not realistic advice and honestly just 0.0001% of students apply it. It’s important to talk to friends and family back home and when living abroad, its comforting if not necessary to hang out with friends who share the same language and cultures as yourself. The key is to have balance. Make practicing and improving English a priority, but also make time to speak in your native tongue.

6. Small talk.

Every culture has its own small talk topics when networking. In my country, talking politics is common- that’s not the case in the US. There are plenty of topics you can talk about in American culture.

One of the most important: weather. It might not seem too interesting and very broad but Americans love talking about the weather- how can you not bring up the blizzard we just had?! Another topic: sports. Personally, I think talking about sports is boring. I know all of the major American teams and I can muster basic small talk around sports, but nothing too deep. If you don’t feel attracted to those topics you might want to get the Metro Boston Newspaper (Free in most MBTA stations) or just go to Small talk will help you make new friends and learn more about American culture- while simultaneously practicing your English!

7. Change your devices. 

Finally, change all your devices to English. Your phone, ipad, computer, etc. Everything should be in English. And be careful: Do not get use to just one American friend; there are a lot of accents (even inside Massachusetts).

Implement all of my tips, or start with just one that works for you. In a few months you will be able to understand and speak better. There are things that can’t be taught; practice is the only way to achieve what we really want.

Maria Martin is pursuing a Master in Project Management at Northeastern University. She is currently doing a full time paid co-op at NSTAR in the Marketing and Sales Department. You can contact her at

Start Early and Set Yourself Apart: An Interview With an NU Alum

Jay Lu received his BSBA in Accounting and Marketing in May 2014 and MS in Accounting this past August, 2014. During his time at NU, he held numerous positions both on and off campus and internationally. Jay successfully completed three separate co-ops at large multinational companies with experience in audit and assurance, tax and operations. Jay recently completed the CPA exam and his currently working in audit and assurance at a CPA firm. In his spare time, he enjoys volunteering, reading and sports. To learn more about his professional background- check out his LinkedIn profile.

When did you first come to the Career Development office?

It was for the Career Fair, freshmen year.

Why go to a career fair? Most freshmen would wait until later for this.

I had no risk.  I didn’t feel pressured.  I didn’t need anything out of it.  I wanted the practice of the experience. It’s kind of like a festival, with everyone dressed up.  It can be a fun event when there isn’t pressure.  I didn’t have a suit back then.  But I went in and just talked with a couple of recruiters.  At this point I didn’t have a resume.  But later on I learned how to create a resume, and how to make a good impression.

What else did you do early on?

Early on I went for an appointment about career direction.  I wasn’t sure how to explore my options.  Through my career counselor I learned about informational interviews.  In fact I even did one for an RA position.  Ended up getting the job because I was more prepared and had someone recommending me from the info interview.  I also got into LinkedIn early on.

From these early experiences, what do you recommend that students do in their 1st or 2nd year?

Don’t think that just because it’s your first year that you have all the time in the world.  You’ll be graduating in a flash.  When you start early, you’ll be ahead for when you need it. When there is less pressure, when you don’t need a job yet, get advice then.

How can students have an impact on potential employers?

A lot of employers want to know if you want them.  It’s not just about your skills.  To stand out, make a good impression early on with them. Be genuinely interested in the field, which should be a natural feeling if you chose a major you are passionate about. Have people warm up to you, and your personal brand early on, even if you might not be fully certain what that is yet.  The idea here is to build your network before you need it.  Things get a lot more competitive, when you are a senior.  Everyone is going after these connections.  By starting early you can set yourself apart. They will be impressed that you are being so proactive.  Another point is that there is more leeway if you mess up, employers will more likely overlook this when you are younger.

How can students make more employer connections?

Go to career services and alumni events.  Do these while you are still on campus.  Once you graduate, it’s harder to fit these in.  Also, the further along you get in college, there are more expectations put on you (from recruiters, parents, peers), compared with when you are in your 1st or 2nd year.

What can you gain from this early networking?

When you chat with recruiters, they might open you up to other career paths that you didn’t know about or hadn’t thought of.  The more exposure and more conversations, the better.  You can never know what you’re going to do, exactly, but you can learn more early on to help.  It’s great if you can find out sooner what you might value in a career, while you can still make changes to your academic or co-op path.  You might save yourself time and heartache.  The more people you talk to, the more confident you’ll be with your choices.  You want to find those people that are in your potential career path, since they’ve already been there and you can learn from them.  Would you want to be in their shoes? Talking to them gives you a chance to find out.

During your senior year, how did you approach your job search?

I didn’t have too much trouble.  I had already been to 3 or 4 career fairs, and I already had quite a few connections from co-ops and various other events. If you have done everything early on, at this point it should be a relaxing year. At my last career fair, I received an interview call in less than an hour after the fair ended.

How do you maintain your network?

Always follow up after any professional encounter. Send a thank-you note after meeting someone at a campus event or any professional encounter.  For example, after attending the Global Careers Forum I sent an email to one of the guest speakers saying thank you.  I didn’t ask for anything in that moment. It might come later. Northeastern makes sending thank-you letters after co-op interviews almost religious, I try to use this same mindset. I always like to think of the story of one interviewee’s thank-you letter being a PowerPoint that showed how he would tackle a current problem facing the company. Now that’s hitting the ground running!

Is there anything you wished you’d known sooner?

Don’t take your professors for granted.  They can be some of the best resources.  They are there for you, and they want to help you.  I made a habit of seeing my professors every semester, even just to chat with them (while you are in the course and sometimes even after).  One professor sent me details about an internship that had been sent in by an alum.  I was given the details about this opportunity because the professor knew me well, and he had confidence in me. In addition, if I had more time, I would’ve joined more organizations that were related to my major.

Anyone you stay in touch with?

One of my accounting professors I went to see a lot.  He had great industry advice about how to get started, he recommended good organizations, and even suggested events to attend.  I sent follow up messages to thank him and to let him know I attended the events he had mentioned, I also shared some information that I thought would be useful for his current students.  It’s important to let people know that you followed their advice, and if you have something you can share, then include it.

What’s your finally advice to students, especially when it comes to networking?

Start early and don’t stop.

Biology and English: Making a Combined Major Work

duel major

This guest post was written by Sarah Sherman, a combined English and Biology major here at NU. 

Choosing a major is a unique experience for everyone. For a lucky few, it is barely a choice at all. There are those who have wanted to be doctors or teachers or business managers since they were young, and who understand what academic roadways they want to travel to get there.  However, for many people, (including myself) the journey is rarely straightforward.

I entered Northeastern as an Undeclared student, and although I wasn’t sure exactly what I wanted, I knew that I was fascinated by  Biology and English.  For a while my thought process alternated between trying to figure out which one I wanted to focus on and trying to figure out if it was possible to double major in Biology and English.  I soon found out that the latter wasn’t feasible without overloading classes for at least one semester or by taking classes for more than eight semesters, neither of which appealed to me. Despite this realization, I still felt no closer to making a decision.  This brings me to my first bit of advice-never underestimate the value of figuring out what it is you don’t want to do.  Sometimes a decision doesn’t come in a flash of inspiration or from a deep inner knowledge of what it is you want.  Sometimes it’s as simple as exploring around and figuring out the things you don’t want to do, until you hit on something that ignites your enthusiasm.

My first breakthrough came when I was attending an Undeclared event, and I had the opportunity to talk to the head of the English Department. I mentioned how I’d been struggling to decide whether I wanted to study Biology or English. She replied, “Why not do a combined major with the two?”  “I can do that?” I asked.  “I don’t see why not” she said.  I would later learn that a combined major was different from a double major in some important ways.  A double major is two degrees, and involves completing all of the courses for each one.  A combined major is one degree, and some of the courses from each discipline are removed to make a more compact curriculum. It also includes an interdisciplinary “bridge” course, making it easier for the student to understand how their two fields of study connect and interact. This brings me to my second piece of advice-don’t be afraid to talk to anyone and everyone at the university about what it is you’re interested in or looking for.  They are likely to be much more familiar with the resources and opportunities that are available than you are.  You may end up learning about possibilities that you didn’t even know existed!

This five minute exchange started me on an almost two year journey to pursue the education that I was passionate about. Although the combined major I wanted did not yet exist, I knew there was a process in place for creating it.  This process included countless meetings, paperwork, curriculum revisions, and several roadblocks.  This brings me to my third piece of advice.  When you find what it is you’re looking for, pursue it with persistence, patience, and passion. The idea that I was so excited about-a new major combining English and Biology-often came across to others as strange and sometimes even nonsensical.  However, I knew it was what I wanted.  I stood my ground even when I could sense disapproval from others.  I may have been met with skepticism at first, but I wasn’t met with a “no” or “we simply can’t do that”.  So I kept pushing forward. The journey was long and sometimes discouraging, but it was worth it because I had found my passion.

Your own journey to declaring a major might be more conventional than mine, or perhaps even less so.  No matter what the case, it is important to keep in mind one overall truth-there is no one “right way” to land yourself a certain future.  In talking with professors and with other adults in the working world, I have learned that there are multiple paths that lead to the same destination.  The important thing is to do something that you get excited about, and to do it well.

Sarah is a third year student at Northeastern University pursuing a Combined Degree in Biology and English. She has completed one co-op at the Boston Center for Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine. She traveled to Italy in the summer of 2013 for a Dialogue of Civilizations, and is looking forward to traveling again during an ASB trip to the Dominican Republic this March.  Contact Sarah for more information about her combined major or her experiences at

Image Source: Carol Simpson Cartoon Work and Illustration; I want to graduate with a dual major…fiction writing and corporate accounting.

Career Confidential: Consulting

consulting1-1024x515So what is consulting exactly?  Tom Peacock, an IT and business transformation consultant at Accenture and 2010 Mechanical Engineering graduate, describes it as coming into a company to help improve a process and/or to solve a specific problem.  Those problems provide a level of thrill and excitement, as you take a complex issue and break it into its simplest components to make a persuasive argument and get your client to trust your analysis and see the merits of your proposed solutions.  As Tom explains, “the biggest thing is really seeing and feeling your client’s satisfaction.”

Tackling these challenging corporate issues takes excellent analytical and problem solving skills, resourcefulness and flexibility, which Tom credits Northeastern and its co-op program for helping him even further hone.   What’s also helped drive his success, is a passion and dedication to his work and showing a whole lot of initiative! In fact, during his undergraduate years, Tom twice took it upon himself to improve companies’ IT processes.  First, Tom returned to a deli, Oliva’s Market, where he had worked in high school to automate their order system.  During his time working at the deli, he had observed the business’s shelves full of binders detailing their more than 200 catering orders per week.  This paper system required someone to tally orders on a daily basis.  Recognizing room for improvement, Tom built an application for them using that automated this process, allowing them to see their orders real-time and to forecast their inventory and resource needs.  Tom still remembers the thrill when he rolled out the application and the amount of time he saved the team at Oliva’s.  Next, and while on this third co-op at Wellington Management in their financial planning group, Tom took it upon himself to completely automate a multi-step process that generated information on budgets and expenses, reducing the monthly time for this task from 16 hours down to 4.

Notwithstanding this natural drive to improve processes, Tom didn’t start out knowing that he wanted to do consulting, but he took the opportunity that Northeastern’s co-op program afforded him to explore options and opportunities.  He completed his first two co-ops at engineering companies, where he further refined the strong problem solving skills that he was developing in his classes.  After his second co-op, he realized he was increasingly interested in using his engineering background to tackle a more traditional business role, prompting him to take some evening MBA business courses and pursue a third co-op in finance at Wellington Management.  His time at Wellington really solidified his desire to transition away from engineering and into a business position, ideally in consulting, where he could become an expert and a trusted advisor in fixing business and/or technical processes.  And so began the job application process.

Tom recounts that he applied to dozens of companies, and although he had a few interviews, it wasn’t until he reaped the rewards of some diligent networking with an individual from Bluewolf at a Northeastern hockey game that he secured an offer. Tom credits the work he did at Wellington Management, particularly when it came to improving business processes with technology as aligning well with the work that Bluewolf did, given its focus on

Tom worked at Bluewolf for nearly three years, during which time he led multiple global programs using to improve the overall efficiency of sales, marketing and customer service processes. Throughout his tenure at Bluewolf, he interacted with over 14 different clients across numerous industries, wearing multiple hats, including that of project manager, process and enablement lead, solution architect, and application lead. Tom says that Northeastern transformed the way he thought about problems and made assumptions which propelled his success on the job. More specifically, the software experience he gained through his C++ and Matlab courses helped him to understand code and to credibly interact with developers.  In looking to give back to Northeastern, and further underscoring his drive, Tom helped to start a co-op program at Bluewolf, which ultimately hired (and continues to hire!) 5-7 new co-op students every 6 months, many of whom have gone on to receive full-time offers.

After a successful run at Bluewolf, Tom was offered, and ultimately accepted, a position at Accenture as a Consultant, where he works in the practice helping companies transform their sales, marketing, and customer service organizations. His focus remains on understanding the business problems that companies face and helping them to understand what changes are needed from a people, process, and technology perspective. In this role, Tom is able to continue his focus on providing IT solutions for his clients, while also working more closely on developing overall strategies to help his clients improve their business processes.

So in light of his success what advice would Tom leave current students with to get their start in consulting?  “Number one is networking.”  As Tom explains, “don’t be afraid to leverage who you know and along those lines, don’t be afraid to reach out” and importantly too, “stay in contact with those you’ve built connections with, including former co-op employers.”  In addition to networking, and once you have an interview lined up, “bring your ‘A’ game.”  For example, when Tom found out about his interview at Bluewolf, he bought the CEO’s book and read it over the weekend. “You have to make sure they know you want the job by effectively preparing.”

Clearly Tom has had a lot of success in the more than four years since he graduated and in the spirit of giving back to his alma mater and helping those who want to navigate success in the world of consulting Tom generously welcomes those who want to reach out for an informational interview!

Tom PeacockTom Peacock is a consultant at Accenture with a passion driving transformational business programs through simplified processes, behavioral change, and technology solutions. His experience and expertise revolves around sales, customer service, and marketing within the electronics and high tech industry. He enjoys using his extended knowledge of to create innovative solutions to improve the overall experience for internal and external customers.

Image Source: Eduworks, Consulting with Eduworks’ Technology

What Do You Want To Be When You Grow Up?

lawyerWhat do you want to be when you grow up? It is a question all of us have had to answer and many still struggle with long after they walk across that stage, degree in hand. If you had asked me that question 10 years ago, I would have told you a lawyer; 5 years ago, I wanted to work in PR. What am I doing now? I’m a career counselor and digital marketing professional. What happened? Well, a lot actually.

Our career choices are impacted by a number of things: family, friends, what we see on TV, our values, and that’s just the short list. Sometimes we make a career or major decision because we think it’s what we want to do without really doing the necessary research of what that career/job actually is.

Let’s take my “I want to be a lawyer” example. Seems like a good idea. I had a solid GPA, I am interested in law, politics and civic engagement, I’m a great public speaker and wanted to choose a somewhat lucrative profession. To top it off, I really enjoy watching legal dramas (I’m still sad USA’s Fairly Legal is no longer on- look it up) and could see myself as the ambitious, crime fighting, do-gooder characters. Fast forward to freshman year of college: after doing some research and talking to professors I found out law is really hard. Understatement of the year, I know, but as I continued to explore the option, it seemed less and less like a good fit for me, and there are a few reasons for that.

One, law is extremely detail oriented, research heavy and entails a lot of independent work. Immediately I am turned off. Two, apparently I’d be working a million hours. One of my strongest values is work/life balance, so this was pretty much the deal breaker for me. Finally, law school is very expensive and at the time, the job market looked pretty bleak for new lawyers. As much as I thought I could kill it as a lawyer, I questioned how happy I would really be going to work everyday. So, what’s my point?

Beginning Thursday, Career Development will be launching a new series entitled Career Confidentials: What It’s Like To Be a “Enter Job Title Here” which will be real people talking about their jobs honestly and candidly. Get an inside look into what it is really like to be in a certain industry and profession and use the info to help you think about if it is a right fit for you. Our first post on Thursday is a doozy: What It’s Like To Be a Consultant- one of the most popular and sought after positions for new grads. Stay tuned!

Kelly Scott is Assistant Director of Career Development and Social Media Outreach at Northeastern University. A social media enthusiast and Gen Y, she enjoys writing about workplace culture and personal online branding. For more career insight, follow/tweet her at @kellydscott4.

Image Source: The Daily Chelle; Day 21: It’s Only Funny If It’s You

How Can I Find a Mentor?

HNCK1708-1300x866-1024x682This post was written by Christine Hathaway, Senior Assistant Director of Marketing for Northeastern University Cooperative Education and Career Development. It was originally posted on and was re-posted with permission from the author.

Whatever your career goals may be, it’s nice to have someone in your corner, rooting for you. The majority of us can truly benefit from and find value in having a mentor to encourage, support and promote us, but this is often easier said than done.

First, you may be asking, “what is a mentor?”  Secondly, “how do I find one?”

As defined in the dictionary, a good mentor is a person who guides a less experienced person by building trust and modeling good behavior.  An effective mentor is someone who is dependable, engaging and understands the needs of the mentee.

Overall, a good mentor will:

  • Access your strengths and weaknesses
  • Help you understand the structure/culture of the organization
  • Introduce new perspectives and help correct any wrong thinking you may have
  • Boost your ability to make decisions (and ask questions)
  • Introduce you to resources and useful references
  • Be an active listener and help keep you focused and on topic

Now that you understand what a mentor is; the bigger question is how do you go aboutfinding one?  Sometimes mentors find you (it happens naturally), but more often than not, YOU need to find someone you respect, even admire and would like to emulate at some point in your career.

Throughout my professional career, I’ve been privileged to have effective career mentors; people who were instrumental in my professional growth.  The first mentor was my boss, many years ago when I worked as her executive assistant. She taught me all about the publishing world, the editorial lingo, how to ask questions and most importantly, to develop my skills, professionally and personally.  I had a lot of respect for her and I found myself wanting to mimic her professional behavior (and her wardrobe, she was a classy dresser!).  That said, I took every opportunity possible to sit down with her over a cup of iced coffee and pick her brain about her career and how she got to where she was.  We did this often, and eventually I got promoted to the marketing department!  She congratulated me and commented, “I’m proud, it’s a compliment to me that you are being promoted, it means I did my job.”  She is still my mentor. Even though we don’t sit and have our iced coffees any more, I still call upon her and she still offers words of wisdom.

It’s not always easy to find a mentor. Here are some tips I learned along the way:

  • Ask yourself what qualities you want in a mentor.  Is it someone who can help promote you or an expert in your field that can help with a business project?
  • Does your HR department have a mentoring program?  Make an appointment and find out more.
  • Check out LinkedIn!  Do an Advanced People Search and look for people that you went to college with or have worked with at previous jobs, even professors from school.
  • Steer away from a formal request! Don’t ask “will you be my mentor.” This is usually not very inviting, if anything it’s a bit off-putting. Instead start by simply asking someone for advice or invite them out for a cup of coffee.  Find out more about their career path.  And, MAKE IT FUN.  Get to know each other. Don’t make it sound like work…smile, and exude excitement.
  • Prepare and practice your speech.  Looking for a mentor means marketing yourself and being self-confident. Learn to promote yourself, talk about some of your accomplishments and seek advice on how you can be better at your job or how you can land that promotion at work. Here is a cool article in Forbes, I read a few years ago, check it out, Trust Yourself and Believe in Yourself!

Now that you have some tips and my own personal mentoring story; start thinking about who you would like to get to know.  Keep trying, don’t give up! Looking for a mentor often happens organically, it’s a relationship that develops over time.  You’ll find that there are mentoring opportunities everywhere!

Good luck!

How to Stay Organized and Maintain the Internship-Class Balance


This guest post was written by Scarlett Ho, a third year International Affairs and Political Science major with a minor in Law and Public Policy.

At a time when the job market is tight, having multiple internships on your resume during your college life can give you a tremendous advantage post-graduation. If you are feeling ambitious, try challenging yourself in 2015 to take up a full course load and a part-time internship. Many people might feel intimidated by the seemingly overwhelming schedule, but don’t be! With good planning and motivation, anything can be achieved. During the fall of 2014, I took classes abroad in Belgium while interning at the European Parliament simultaneously. I can personally attest to how doable it is if you put your mind to it. The following tips should guide you along the way as you plan ahead for a new year:

Time Management:

It might be a cliché, but time management is essential if you want to ensure success. Before the start of a semester, always plan ahead with a daily and weekly schedule to divide your time between classes and the internship. I recommend dedicating big chunks of time for each to allow your mind to focus. When registering for classes, try  concentrating them in a few days, allowing 2-3 full-time days for your internship. If this is not possible, try classes in the morning and work in the afternoon, or vice versa. That way, your mind and you will not be wandering around every few hours or so.

Thinking the Big Picture: Prioritizing and Be Realistic

While it is important to do well in an internship, be realistic about your time and know what your ultimate goal is in college- to get good grades. The workload of your internship may vary, but at the end of the day you have to remember what is more important. A word of caution for those who are considering taking up an internship, is that you have to ask yourself if extra workload will not sacrifice your grades. Internships, particularly unpaid ones, are likely to be very flexible and accommodating to interns’ class schedules, so definitely take advantage of that and choose the right balance between classes and work. Many employers are also very generous and they allow interns to do homework or study if the office is not busy, scoop out what the office culture/schedule is like in interviews to get a sense of the intensity and how that fits into your studies.

A Good Work-Life Balance: Down Time

Health and fitness is key if you want to stay on top of your schedule. But relaxation is equally important to recharge your energy, and keep you in a positive mood. Classes and internships can be tough and demanding in their own ways, so be sure to give yourself a little treat, such as catching up with old friends, doing a sport you enjoy, reading a book to distress. Surround yourself with motivated and like-minded people who will always encourage you to keep on going. (Check out this link for more tips on self-care.)


At the end of the day, an internship is a complement to your studies, which is a manifestation of what you study in classes and it should align with your academic/professional interest. When picking an internship, think of the classes you are taking that semester and do something related to that. That way, you can apply what you learn in classes in real life. The fact that the two reinforces each other as they are closely related will allow you to benefit from the best of both worlds.

Scarlett Ho is a third year International Affairs and Political Science major with a minor in Law and Public Policy. During fall 2014, she studied abroad in Belgium where she interned at the European Parliament. The summer prior to that, she interned for Senator Warren on Capitol Hill, and previously Congressman Lynch in Massachusetts. She can be reached at for any questions ranging from resume writing, job searching to her experiences.

Photo source: Jeff Sheldon,

Mastering Moving to a New City

woman looking out window

This guest post was written by recent NU alum and frequent contributor, Kristina Swope.

Congratulations! You got a real job in a brand new city. Now what?

Moving to a new city is both the most riveting and terrifying experience I’ve ever had. I had just turned 22 and was fresh out of college in rural Pennsylvania. I was living at home, getting comfortable, and then it happened – I got a job in Center City Philadelphia.

First, I was ecstatic, because let’s be honest, I had a BA in Sociology and had no idea what to do with it. Then when the initial excitement wore off and I was alone with my thoughts, I started to have serious anxiety about the timing. I only had two weeks to move out of my college apartment, find a new apartment in an area I’d been to twice, move in and get settled enough to avoid being an emotional disaster my first day of work. I was overwhelmed and kept coming back to the same thought; am I doing this? Can I do this? Can I really move to Philly when I’ve never been in a building higher than 4 stories? Cue freak out and bring over the tub of ice cream.

Rather than sweets, what I really needed was perspective. This was an exciting life change and an amazing opportunity. I needed to stop being afraid of the next chapter, and the only way to do that was to prepare and embrace it.

In order to embrace the change, you need to prepare – physically, mentally, and emotionally.

  1. Research areas to live. You want to live somewhere safe but you don’t want to be isolated. Google has plenty of information on towns that include events and demographics that are key in the young professional search. It takes time to delve into stats but it’s definitely worth it. Also, Career Development has a great resource called USA Career Guides that provides with a wealth of information on every major city in the US. From cost of living to industry and employment trends it’s a great way to get acquainted with your new city before actually getting there. Access this resource through HuskyCareerLink.
  2. Choose an apartment that has public transportation within walking distance. I can’t stress this one enough. One of the scariest aspects of moving to a new city is having no idea where you’re going. Relying on public transportation relieves you of that stress and allows you to focus on the more important items, like settling in to your new job and apartment.
  3. Speaking of apartments – rent, don’t buy. Your first apartment will likely be strategically planned, based on convenience. Once you know the surrounding areas, you’ll find an area you like better. Renting gives you the freedom to move and create a home somewhere that you truly love.
  4. Check your networks. The age of social media is a beautiful thing. Facebook and LinkedIn were vital in my search for friends because of the search location functions. I found a number of people I knew that were living in the area and proceeded to cling to them like white on rice. A city is way less scary when you have familiar faces around.
  5. Locate stores for your key needs. Find your closest grocery store, bank, pharmacy, mall, Target, gym, etc. within a day or two of moving. The sooner you find them, the sooner you can get back into your routine and feel more comfortable in your new space.
  6. Plan to go out of your way to make friends. If I could do my first year out of school over again, I would try harder to meet others. Push yourself to go out more, do more with your hobbies, and join local groups. It’s easy to meet people when you’re engaging in activities you enjoy, and friends are worth turning off Netflix for!

Kristina is a full-time Market Research Project Manager in Philadelphia and a graduate of NU with a Master of Science in Organization and Corporate Communication, and a Leadership concentration. Check out her LinkedIn profile here.  

Finding an Internship Without Prior Experience



This guest post was written by Sam Carkin, a middler studying Marketing and Interactive Media. This article was originally posted on The Works on February 24, 2014.

The “real world” can be intimidating; especially when you’re just starting out. Sure, that first job as a house painter or bus boy is great for earning some money and learning to work with others, but I am assuming if you came to Northeastern you are looking to do something within your major. Northeastern is special in the sense that co-op allows you to work within your major prior to graduation, but what if you want some experience for your résumé before applying to that first co-op job? A summer internship right after your freshman year is an awesome way to go, and something I had the opportunity to do last summer with integrated marketing firm GY&K. Below, is some strategies I used for landing that internship where I gained experience in the marketing and advertising field before my first co-op (which will begin in July).

1. Network, network, network:  I visited a family friend who worked at a huge marketing agency called Arnold Worldwide. He had been in the industry a while and agreed to introduce me to an employee at GY&K, the person who ultimately offered me the internship. Ask your parents, ask your friends, find SOMEONE that works in your industry of choice and ask them if they know anyone that you might be able to talk to or work for.

2. Informational Interviews are kEY: OK, so I had been introduced to this person from GY&K, but what now? An informational interview is a perfect way to demonstrate professionalism and interest, while also learning a great deal from someone who knows the industry well. If it goes well, you have a better chance of possibly working for the person you speak with.

3. Have confidence: Going in to speak with an industry professional can be extremely intimidating; however, setting up informational interviews shows that you are genuinely interested in what that person does and see them as a successful individual in their field. They will be just as excited to tell you what they know as you are to learn, and it should be treated as a casual conversation during which you can make a great first impression.

4. Do not be afraid to ask: If your interview went well, at the end feel free to ask if that professional’s company has any opportunities for you to gain experience, or if they know of any other companies that might have these opportunities. It will allow you to possibly find that internship position, or continue to grow your network.

Sam Carkin is currently in his 3rd year at Northeastern University. He is a dual major of Business Administration-Marketing and Interactive Media and will be finishing up his first co-op this month. Feel free to contact him at with any questions related to the blog post or his experiences.