In, out and back again – 12 LinkedIn Updates You Need to Know

LinkedIn-Logo-2CThis post was written by Sabrina Woods. Sabrina is an Associate Director at Northeastern University’s Career Development office and also owns her own private practice. This post originally appeared on LinkedIn, October 16, 2014. 

Keeping up with LinkedIn can be a challenge. Something new gets added, something else gets taken away. In, then out, then sometimes back again. Here are 12 of LinkedIn’s latest updates:

profile rank 4 at NU

Who’s Viewed Me?

Now LinkedIn is showing you more details about who has viewed your profile and what actions you took that helped this number to increase. Martin Beck talks about this new feature in his post, “LinkedIn Now Shows How You Sparked That Engagement.” Review more details on LinkedIn’s own blog. I have to admit that I kind of got a kick out of seeing one of my own stats.

Some Take Aways (as in things LinkedIn has taken away)

As we all know, whether we like it or not, LinkedIn occasionally takes away some of the things we like. So, the latest is that you can no longer get introduced to 3rd degree connections. Who knows, one day it might be back. However, in the meantime, Donna Serdula gives us some great work-arounds in her article.

It’s Back! You can see “Recent Activity” Again

This feature, of being able to see what your connections are posting, liking and commenting on, used to show up right on a person’s profile. Then it went away. But, now it has returned. And I’m very happy about this. To find it, go to a 1st level connection’s profile and hover over the drop down menu next to the “Send a message” box at the top. The first option now says, “View recent activity.” More from LinkedIn’s blog here.

Tap the Visual Trend: Add a Header

You can now add a visual header to your profile. When this first rolled out it was only for premium accounts. However, I just found out from a colleague (thanks Mike Ariale), that this is now available on the free LinkedIn account. Want to learn more? Viveka von Rosen shares details here.

“Groups” is Out

When sending LinkedIn invites, you can no longer select “groups” as the way you know invitationsomeone. Darn. But, don’t worry, in most cases (unless someone has changed their own settings), you can still select another category. To work around this issue, I have started selecting the “friend” category. Even if that isn’t quite the best fit, not to worry as the person getting the invitation doesn’t see what category you have selected.

LinkedIn’s “New Tools for Students” are actually perfect for grown-ups

I’ve been playing around with the University Finder, and I discovered I could use it for other purposes beyond it’s main point. For example, I’m teaching a LinkedIn workshop next week to grad students who are studying nutrition. They aren’t interested in finding a university, but they can use this tool to see what individuals are doing (what companies they work for) that studied Food, Nutrition & Wellness. You can run this same type of search via the Find Alumni tool, but it is limited to just looking at data from one university at a time. To read more about it, click here.

Know Your Numbers & Monitor Your Metrics

This post, “9 LinkedIn Metrics to Keep Your Eye On” by Viveka von Rosen helps you to really look at, track and think about how you can enhance your online presence.

Customize those Invites, Now on Your Mobile App

If you’re like me in that you prefer to send customized invites, then using the mobile app has been a tad frustrating. You’d meet someone cool at a conference, want to connect right then from your phone, but couldn’t until now, customize that message. So glad they changed this!

Certify those Certifications

Have you taken a course from Coursera or Lynda? Now there are 7 different online education companies that have partnered with LinkedIn to certify that course you took. I’m currently taking an EdX course (the Science of Happiness, in case you were curious), and they are included too! Details can be found in this post from The Next Web.

You Own It, Thank Goodness

The core message from LinkedIn’s latest “Terms of Service” is that YOU own your content. Yes, this is very good news indeed. If you ever worried about your blog post ending up being sold off somewhere, now you can rest assured that won’t be the case. Get the details in their blog.

Data Overload, I Mean Download

You can now request an archive of your data and download a file with pretty much your entire existence of interactions on LinkedIn. It’s not the prettiest document to look at, but it is very cool that you can actually get a copy of a tremendous about of info. What’s included? It ranges from content you’ve posted, shared, liked, or commented on; your search history; ads you’ve clicked on, and much more.

 

Take #theLinkedInChallengelinkedin challenge

This one is simple – introduce 2 connections that can benefit each other. I love this concept and post from Brynne Tillman. Check it out and start making those introductions; join in for the LinkedIn Challenge. Okay, this one wasn’t a “LinkedIn Update,” but it’s a fabulous idea I couldn’t resist promoting.

 Additional Timely Advice

Sabrina Woods is an Associate Director at Northeastern University Career Development.  Sabrina also works as a LinkedIn Trainer and has taught workshops in the US, UK and Middle East.  When not hanging out on LinkedIn, or meeting with Northeastern students, Sabrina enjoys discovering new coffee shops, adventuring outside and baking brownies.  If you’d like to connect, feel free to send her an invitation via LinkedIn

How to Diversify a Resume

resume picMany job positions nowadays are multidisciplinary – calling for skills and traits from multiple backgrounds. If you are pursuing a seemingly narrow field like nursing or engineering, there are ways to make your resume stand out and grow to include other fields you may not have had any other way of tapping into.

1. Include varied volunteer experiences

Don’t think that short volunteer trips or one-time volunteer experiences don’t count! Spending your spring break in Nicaragua shows that service is important to you and you include it in your life whenever you can. If mentoring and teaching are skills you want to enhance talk about that time you helped at-risk teens with after-school tutoring. A volunteer position is just as valuable as a paid job and develops just as many skills. Treat them equally!

2. Don’t leave out any language skills

Even being conversational in a different language is an important addition to a resume. In healthcare, speaking different languages means interacting with more diverse patients. In the business world, a second language proficiency could mean an opportunity to work in a different branch abroad. Even if you’re just learning a language, mention that to showcase how well-rounded of an individual you are in your spare time. In an increasingly global shared economy, culture is a strength to employers.

3. Articulate your social media expertise

Are you active on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube? Write your own blog? Share that! More creative positions will embrace a strong online presence with the knowledge that you would be able to apply your know-how to their own brand. Translate your online self as a desirable and marketable professional.

4. Certifications show mastery in a specific skill

Do you have cool certifications in things like bartending, scuba diving or Photoshop? Include them in your resume! These are the cherries on top to show off the many colorful facets to your life. Who knows, that bartending license could do well in the restaurant and hospitality business, scuba diving could earn you an adventure of a lifetime working for an environmental non-profit, and Photoshop could get you that gig at the magazine of your dreams. A love of learning new skills and topics, can only do a candidate good.

5. Weave in your hobbies

Take advantage of the “interests” section in your resume. If you’re a yoga enthusiast or write poetry, don’t be afraid to share that. This is the space to connect with the interviewer and leave them with a positive last thought about you. When it comes down to it, we’re all humans with our own special interests and that’s what will make you memorable when compared with someone with the exact GPA and coursework and similar internships as you.

Angelica is a fourth-​​year nursing stu­dent with a minor in Eng­lish hailing from New Jersey. She has studied or worked in all the major Boston hos­pi­tals. Angelica is also a colum­nist for The Hunt­ington News and enjoys writing cre­ative non-​​fiction. 

Image Source: For College Students: Writing Your First Resume via LinkedIn

How To Stand Out In A Good Way

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This post was written by Diane Ciarletta, Director of Northeastern University Career Development.

Starting a new co-op or full-time job can be a challenge.  As the new kid on the block, you not only have to learn how to do the job, but also how to fit in with the company and make a strong impression. However, in most organizations, just being good at your job is not enough to get you noticed.  If you want to turn your coop into a full time offer or get on your boss’s radar for a promotion, it is important to find effective ways to increase your visibility.  You want your colleagues and manager to see you as a leader who adds value to the team and the company.  As a manager, I have hired several interns into permanent positions.  What differentiated them from the competition to win a coveted spot on our team?

Here are four ways you can make yourself stand out:

1. Go beyond your job description

View your job description as the minimum expectation and don’t ever be heard saying, “That’s not my job!”  Spend your first few weeks observing others, asking questions and figuring out ways you can add value to your team.  If you see something that needs to be done-take the initiative, bring it to your boss’ attention and offer your help.  If you find a way to do something more efficiently, suggest it with a concrete plan.  Step out of your comfort zone to learn a new skill or take on a project that no one else wants to do.  Possess a Yes-I-can attitude. If you show a willingness to learn or try something that would be beneficial to the company-you will definitely be positioning yourself for success.

2. Manage your time well

If you want to stand out, it is critical that you be regarded as someone who gets things done and done well.  Missing deadlines, or handing in a less-than-stellar project because you didn’t give yourself enough time to do it right is unacceptable.  The ability to multi-task, i.e. managing competing projects simultaneously, is expected of most employees, and is critical for anyone who aspires to a leadership role. It is important to prioritize your time when it comes to completing projects in order to get them done on time.  If you are unsure of which tasks to complete first, have a conversation with your supervisor to clarify expectations, and avoid potential problems in the future.

3. Speak up in meetings

The way you present yourself in meetings can have a big impact on your career. If you don’t let yourself be heard and never offer an opinion or comment, you may be giving off the impression that you are not invested.  Even if you are more introverted and prefer to think things through before you speak, find ways to participate.  When you do speak up, say your points succinctly and clearly.  A great way to figure out how to become an effective speaker is by watching those who do it well.  Meetings are where a lot of business gets done, and contributing your ideas publicly allows your boss and your peers to see you as a leader.

4. Ask for feedback and use it to improve

Getting feedback and constructive criticism from your peers and supervisor is one of the best ways to gauge your performance.  If your manager offers unsolicited feedback about a perceived problem or mistake, don’t be defensive.  Instead, take ownership and accountability and devise a strategy to address the problem.  If your manager doesn’t volunteer performance feedback –ask for it-appropriately.  You could request a regular one-to-one meeting to discuss problems, status updates and check-in about how you are doing.  When you are seeking feedback, don’t ask, “How am I doing?”  It’s too general and might not elicit specific, concrete suggestions.  Instead, ask about the one-thing.  For example, “What is one thing I could do to improve the way I…?  If someone takes the time and effort to give you feedback make sure you demonstrate how you are using it to improve your performance.

Diane Ciarletta is the Director of the Career Development Team.  She has been a Career Counselor for over 25 years and has hired and supervised many interns and professional staff.

Photo Source: Man Climbing Stairs

8 tips to feel confident, articulate, and in control at your next interview

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This guest post was written by NU high tech MBA alumna, Charis Loveland. 

Growing my career in the male-dominated high tech industry has prepared me for one of the more stressful aspects of the job lifecycle: interviewing. Although I’ve certainly suffered from my own bouts of impostor syndrome, especially since I entered the technical field from a non-traditional background of English and publishing, I have been able to overcome this and hone my interviewing persona thanks to a lot of helpful advice. I’ve also gleaned tips about confidence, posture, and presentation from role models like Sheryl Sandberg, Grace Hopper, and Duy-Loan Le (who delivered the best keynote I’ve ever seen at the Grace Hopper 2010 conference). I enjoy sharing what works for me by coaching my friends and colleagues in the hopes that it can help them in their next interview or stressful job situation. Anecdotally, these tips seem to work well for all industries, not just technology. I hope that you will find them useful, too!

  1. Be engaged. Let your personality and enthusiasm for the job shine through. Make sure that you take a couple of notes so that you can put an impressive detail or two in your thank you note, but don’t take so many that you are not making as much eye contact as you need.
  1. Prepare. To borrow a phrase from the 90s, “duh,” but hear me out. If a recruiter or potential manager calls to discuss business, and you’re in the car or otherwise engaged, ask to call back at a more convenient time. You don’t want to be responding to detailed salary or other questions without your head completely in the game, or you run the risk of making a costly mistake. Being prepared also means that you know to ask if the job title is negotiable, and that you fully understand the level at which you are entering the organization. Confusing and varying titles mean different things at different companies. If you don’t have this discussion, then you run the risk of entering an organization at a lower title and pay scale than you realize.
  1. Be ready to formulate articulate answers. I value the advice I received from my online moms’ forum about the right way to answer a question: Stop, listen, breathe, then speak. This has the two-fold benefit of giving yourself a chance to collect your thoughts and prepare a reply while minimizing the number of times you use “like” or “um.” This allows you to present the best, most polished version of yourself.
  1. Ask intelligent, relevant questions. A job interview is a two-way street, and you need to ensure that the company and role are as good a fit for you as you are for them. Transcend the hackneyed “what’s a typical day like?” and really dig deep for questions that will help you better understand the role and company culture. Feel free to ask what the interviewer likes and dislikes about the group, or what advice an outside consultant might give the company.
  1. Be aware of your body language. If you haven’t seen Amy Cuddy’s touching TED Talk, do it now. Confident body posture is an outstanding way to show your potential employers that you are professional and prepared. Before an interview, I practice a power pose for about 2 minutes by raising my arms overhead, and breathing deeply. This is best done in a bathroom stall for privacy’s sake.
  1. Take time to visualize. My friend, who just used this tip to get her new job as a professor, calls this my Jedi mind trick. I got this tip from a couple of guys on the sales team at my publishing company. It’s so simple, yet so powerful. Just before your interview, make eye contact with yourself in the mirror and give yourself a pep talk. Mine goes something like: “You deserve to be here. You are articulate, intelligent, and confident. You are going to [fill in the blank with desired outcome: get a second interview, run a successful meeting, get offered the job].” To accomplish this, I arrive at an interview at least 15 minutes early and wait for the bathroom to clear out, or do the technique in my car’s sunshade mirror. I combine this with tip #5 for maximum impact. I realize that this idea sounds so corny, but just try it. Everything in me changes after I give this little talk. I stand up straighter, act with more conviction, and feel professional and together. You can put on this “fake it ‘til you make it” attitude in almost any situation: a big meeting, a first date, or any other potentially stressful encounter.
  1. Close the deal. I always end my interview with this question or a variation on it. “I really want this job. If you have any concerns or questions about my candidacy, I would very much appreciate an opportunity to address them with you before you make your final decision.” This is effective in two ways: you express your willingness to accept the role given the right offer, plus you have a chance to counter any potential roadblocks to getting that offer.
  1. Negotiate. Once you have an offer for a job, be sure not to neglect the last, critical step. Think creatively about what is important to you: salary, benefits, vacation time, flexibility, stock options, travel and training opportunities, tuition reimbursement, anything else that has value for you. Realize that the way you prioritize these criteria in your 20s may be very different from the items that you value in your 40s. It’s normal that you would seek out travel opportunities in your 20s, for example, but might not welcome frequent travel later in your career.

Getting to Yes and Difficult Conversations are two excellent books that can help you to maximize your next job offer. For a bulletproof way to approach your next salary negotiation, check out the Get a Raise Prep School program and its sister site Work Options, which offers several templates for negotiating telecommuting, a higher salary, and other flexible options. Founder Pat Katepoo’s professional writing and solid research will enable you to effectively prepare and confidently negotiate the aspects of your job that you value the most.

This post contains affiliate links. For more information, visit my disclosure policy.

CharisAs a magna cum laude English major at Bates College, Charis Loveland never expected to find herself managing global projects at EMC. But she developed a passion for technology and its ability to transform the world while editing articles teaching SAP software. After leaving the publishing industry to work for SAP for 5 years, Charis joined EMC in 2012. She graduated with honors from Northeastern University’s high tech MBA program in 2013. Follow her blog and find Charis online at http://about.me/charisloveland, @charislove, and https://www.linkedin.com/in/charisloveland.

 

Image source: Interviewing Image via tjpeel.com via Nick at tjpeel.com; Bio pic via author’s father, Chuck Campbell

Career Tips for Students with Disabilities

self advocate quoteBelieve it or not, qualified workers with disabilities are some of the most sought after new hires in today’s corporate America.  Naturally, employers are looking to colleges and universities as a main talent pipeline for people with disabilities. Here are a few tips to help navigate the world of disability as you begin your own career search!

Become a self-advocate:

If you are a student with a disability, likely you’ve had help planning your accommodations or IEP as you went through school. In the professional world, no one will initiate these conversations for you. YOU will need to get the ball rolling. By knowing what tools you need to succeed in the workplace, you can begin to advocate on your own behalf for success! So step back and take a look at what your need to succeed, and to who you should speak with about this in a professional setting. What accommodations will you need, if any to get the job done?

When talking about disability in the workplace, focus on abilities, accomplishments, and achievements. Living with a disability can in fact be good for business! Alan Muir, executive Director of Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities, points out that people with disabilities are fantastic problem solvers.  Muir says “Problem-solving, thinking outside the box—or whatever you may want to call the skill—is something people with disabilities have in abundance”. This unique perspective is invaluable for companies competing for the next big innovation in their respective industries

Be informed about your rights and responsibilities under federal, state and local legislation:

No one likes to read through a massive legal document chock full of legal jargon that will make your brain melt, I’ll give you that. Never fear, because there are resources that make all the dry dense stuff a little easier to read for us non legal folk. The Job Accommodation Network (JAN)  is a great website that gives the TL:DR on the reams of paper it takes to print legislation like the Americans with Disabilities Act, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and other resources about determining reasonable workplace accommodations.

Still not sure what this all means for you? JAN has free consultants that can help you answer any questions about disability and employment!

Join a community:

With 11% of enrolled college students and one in five Americans reporting that they have some kind of disability, I can guarantee you are not alone and that others are facing similar experiences.  This identity can be used to unite, support, and educate those around you! Not sure where to start? Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities is a national organization that connects students and employers together through its FULL ACCESS: Student Summit, which takes place regionally twice a year.

Looking to connect professionally? Many employers now have Employee Resource Groups for people with disabilities that serve as a space for employees with shared identities or interests to create professional development opportunities, provide peer support, and act as a voice to promote social change in the workplace. Finding out if groups and diversity initiatives like this exist at employers that you are interested in working for is a great way to see what value a company places on disability inclusive diversity.

Bottom line:  At first glance talking about a disability in the work place can be complex, intimidating and overwhelming, no doubt about it. At Career Development, we have staff that can help you make sense of how to address your disability as you begin your job search. So come on by, make an appointment with one of Career Advisors today! We are here to help you get hired for your skills and abilities, not just your disability.

Mike Ariale specializes in disability employment, self- advocacy, disclosure and accommodation strategies for the workplace. You can schedule an appointment with him through MyNEU or by calling the front desk at 617-373-2430.

Image Source: Post-it Quote- Pinterest

 

What I Learned From Applying to Fellowships

fellowships pic

Class of 2015. I have been looking forward to those words every day since freshman year. This is going to be my year. Well, mine and the other 1.8 million students graduating with a bachelor’s degree in the US this year. Throughout my college career I thought we were all on the same road with only two exits, a job or grad school, until someone told me about graduate fellowships.

Many fellowship programs exist to fund studies, research and teaching abroad, while others offer ways to embark on long-term journalism projects or short-term positions at successful organizations after graduation. Falling somewhere in between a first job and a graduate education, fellowships are a great option for recent graduates to develop crucial career experience without going down the traditional career path.

I’ve spent my summer applying to several graduate fellowships and now consider myself something of an expert in the field of Getting Your Act Together. Here’s what I learned:

There are lots of post-graduation options. Apart from the default options of getting a job or enrolling in graduate school immediately after undergrad, fellowships exist across all disciplines that allow you to continue studying, travel abroad, conduct independent research and teach with other passionate individuals.

Northeastern has a department dedicated to helping you find the right fit. The Northeastern University Office of Fellowships is here to not only inform you of all the opportunities, but also to help you formulate a clear proposal that articulates your ambitions, talents and projects.  Northeastern’s Department of Career Development also has a resource page on fellowships that you can review.

Organize your Northeastern experience and develop an entirely new elevator pitch. Speaking of articulating your ambitions, talents and projects, it’s helpful to sit down and condense your Northeastern experience into a coherent elevator pitch. Five years at Northeastern looks quite different than five years anywhere else. Streamlining classes, dialogues, co-op’s and personal experiences into a story that aligns with a proposed program is a challenge, but it can be done.

Get over your fear of networking. The idea of asking people I didn’t know to offer me advice and suggestions on post-graduation opportunities and potential careers always scared me. But it turns out what everyone had been telling me was true―people love talking about how they got where they are, and are willing to help out a sincere student. They were once in your shoes, after all.

Start early, but take your time. The number of options available to college graduates is overwhelming. Odds are you won’t find the perfect situation the first time you sit down and start looking. So start early and map out some options of where you could see yourself in 5, 10 and 20 years. Keep an ongoing list of postgraduate possibilities, never deleting any of your ideas. Having too many options may be just as panic inducing as not having any options, but keeping a list and taking your time will give you somewhere to start.

So as you begin to wrap up your studies and see the “real world” looming up ahead, remember that you aren’t trapped on one exit ramp. There is a world of options after graduation, and exploring them just takes a little extra planning.

Madeline Heising is a senior Communication Studies major with a passion for food and food policy. She enjoys cooking and writing for her recipe blog, The Collegiate Vegan, while drinking copious amounts of coffee. Connect with her on Twitter @MadelineHeising.

Image Source: Cafe Workspace with Diary, picjumbo

5 Unique Cover Letter Tips You Haven’t Heard Before

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The right cover letter requires much balance. A balance between individualization and professionalism, storytelling and credential listing, all while trying to look appealing but not desperate. It’s very much like a dating profile or movie review – all trying to convince a person (the potential date, moviegoer, employer) to do something (date you, see a movie, hire you) while hitting home key points and not revealing too much too soon. Here are some unique tips on crafting the cover letter:

1. Use an unlikely anecdote to relay a skill in an interesting way

For an internship I did at Grub Street, Boston’s creative writing center, I wrote in my cover letter that my marketing experience at the time was informing and spreading awareness on drug abuse to incarcerated women at the Suffolk County Jail with nothing more than a trifold poster board and some pamphlets. I made a point that “knowing your audience” never rang more true. Even if you don’t have traditional training or expertise in a skill you can modify what you do have experience in to showcase the desired skill in a refreshing way.

2. Don’t address a person unless you’re sure that person will be the one reading it

Know whose hands your cover letter will end up in. Whether that’s the recruiter, human resources director, or the employer themselves, don’t throw any name in. It’s better to go with “Dear Hiring Manager” in that case.

3. Incorporate “you” more than “I”

Speak more on the company/organization or the job position than you do on yourself. Count the number of times you use “I” in your cover letter and cut those times by half. Make it about them – the reader will notice a different tone, a more likeable and considerate person rather than someone who is retelling their life story. Serve yourself to them on a silver platter – “If you believe my skills are a match for your position then you may contact me at …”

4. Don’t use a template; customize a cover letter for each unique position

There are so many cover letter templates on the Internet, but challenge yourself to write your own. The script is all the same and when you are using jargon or language you are not comfortable with it will show. Be conversationally professional. Be unforgettable in a good way.

5. Reuse strong verbs from the job description

Mirror the language use provided in the job description. If concrete verbs like “utilize” or “coordinate” is used repeat those in your letter. Subtle repetition shows you’re on the same page as the recruiter and makes you sound more like a peer rather than a candidate.

Angelica is a fourth-​​year nursing stu­dent with a minor in Eng­lish hailing from New Jersey. She has studied or worked in all the major Boston hos­pi­tals. Angelica is also a colum­nist for The Hunt­ington News and enjoys writing cre­ative non-​​fiction. 

Image source: Cat Typing

From Applying to Acing The Capitol Hill Internship

scarlett ho in front of capitol

Posing in front of the Capitol

This guest post was written by Scarlett Ho, a third year student majoring in International Affairs and Political Science, with a minor in Law and Public Policy.

For any Political Science major, working in the nation’s capital is an once-in-a-lifetime experience. Getting an internship on the Hill while still in college is not only useful in helping you decide if public policy is your niche, but also helps you get a foot in the door in other federal-related jobs in the field. This past summer, I had the fortunate opportunity to intern for a member of Congress in Washington D.C., and here are a few tips I would like to share to help anyone who is thinking about interning on the Hill.

1) The Application Process and the Interview

Most congressional internships require a standard resume and cover letter, followed by an interview. Sounds like a pretty easy process, but how do you stand out among hundreds of applicants?

  • Email etiquette: Most people think that all you need to do when you email your application package is just to attach the files. But from my personal experience, crafting a short and sweet paragraph in the email containing your brief bio and objective will make your application more personable. Remember, small things matter, so make sure your resume and cover letter are free from typos and grammatical mistakes. One way to ensure that is to ask your professional network, professors and friends to proofread them.
  • Interview: So you have received an invitation for an interview, how should you prepare? Research the office, know your objectives and why you want to intern there. What are your passions, and how is this internship going to contribute to your goal? Since most interview questions always revisit your past internships, be sure to be able to explain every detail you have put down on paper. Rehearse, do mock interviews, and feel confident. Remember, the secret to interviewing is: it’s not “what” you say, it’s “how” you say it.

2) Working on the Hill

Everyone has to start somewhere, and you should come to any job with the mindset that you are starting from the bottom. With that, it means mundane and trivial administrative tasks, such as answering and transferring phone calls, photocopying/scanning, and running errands. But on top of that, you should seize this wonderful opportunity to benefit the most out of it too:

  • Attend briefings/committee hearings: Fortunately for a Hill internship, because you’ll be at the center of politics, interns get the chance to go to different hearings and briefings and take notes. It is a great opportunity to learn more about the issue; and any memos that come out of it will be a great writing sample for the future.
  • Ask questions: Remember: no one knows the answer to everything. If you have questions or doubts, ask your fellow interns or supervisors- they will likely be able to answer them for you. Asking questions demonstrates that you’re proactive and thoughtful- something every employer would value. Additionally, ask for more tasks or offer to assist others in their work when you have completed yours. Your willingness to help others proves that you’re collaborative and are inclined to take initiative.
  • Networking: It’s all about connections, that is the truth. Be active in seeking out intern networking events, or receptions near the D.C. area to talk to people from different fields and offices. Seek out interesting people from LinkedIn, through friends and ask for informational interviews either in person or over the phone. Be flexible and respect people’s time because they are busy but are generally willing to help.

3) Ways to Take your Hill Internship To The Next Level

  • Keep a journal: It is important to keep track of your daily or weekly tasks, because at the end of your internship, you need to have talking points that summed up your responsibilities on your resume. Even if you don’t keep a journal (which is mostly for writing about your feelings and what you have learned), have a small notebook that jots down your tasks to make it easier to keep track in the future.
  • Recommendations: I was advised by a Capitol Hill staff to ask for the letter the last week of your internship, so that you will have the letter in hand on your last few days. By creating a time constraint for the recommender, they will most likely craft a more thoughtful response because you can read it when you are still there. After your internship is over, connect with the staff on LinkedIn and ask to be recommended.
  • Thank you note: A small thank you note for each staff in the office goes a long way. A nice hand-written note makes a lasting impression and you never know who will help you down the road. Therefore, this is a critical step that should not be skipped.

Interested in working in government? Career Development is hosting a Non Profit and Government Careers Forum at 5:30PM, tonight in Raytheon. Also, Thursday, October 16th at 5PM in 12 Stearns: Demystifying the Federal Job Application.

Bio pic_scarletthScarlett Ho is a third year student majoring in International Affairs and Political Science, with a minor in Law and Public Policy. She is a former Capitol Hill intern and will be interning at the European Parliament this fall with NU’s study abroad program. As a trilingual, she is interested in foreign affairs and diplomacy, and is an avid globetrotter. Connect with Scarlett on LinkedIn and follow her on                                                                                            Twitter.

 

Good luck everyone!

What does it mean to work for a non-profit?

non profit post word cloud

This guest post was written by NU Pre-Law and Graduate School Advisor, Anne Grieves.

It may mean that you won’t be making as much money as your friend at Fidelity.  It may mean that you come home from work emotionally drained.  It may also mean that you come home knowing you had a positive impact on something or someone. Wherever you end up 5, 10, 15 years from now, having had even one experience working at a non-profit will give you what you won’t be able to buy with any amount of money.

In my 20s I worked for two educational travel companies; one was a for-profit and one was a not-for-profit.  Each one offered amazing opportunities, but looking back, it was at the not-for-profit that I developed a stronger sense of self, gained professional self-confidence and knew that what I brought and gave was important and valued.

Working at the for-profit was FUN.  The management team had frequent celebrations (with champagne), gave out bonuses, hosted annual team building ropes course retreats and much more.  Anything to incentivize the staff.  However, each month, those that didn’t perform as expected, were cut.  There were quotas to meet and if they weren’t… tough luck.  People came and went so frequently that developing relationships was very challenging.

Of course not all for-profits are like this.  But, if the bottom line is making money, sometimes it comes at the expense of other things.

Five years later I worked at a similar company, but the fact that it was a not-for-profit (slightly different from non-profit), allowed me to grow in ways I would not have been able to at the previous company.  I had opportunities to be creative, was able to get involved with many projects and connected with every single person in the organization.  Everyone was open and willing to mentor.  People were busy but were not driven by the bottom line.

The president of the company who turned 50 while I was there, started as an intern while he was in college.  I was surprised to learn that many employees had been there for over 10, 15 and even 20 years.  This was in 2000 and many of them are still there today!  We did not have expensive celebrations (rather potluck parties).  We did not have fancy office supplies.  We had a sense of community.  We had the daily awareness that we were creating something of value for society and we cared to do our best without monetary incentives.

Sure- even there some people had to be let go.  But, only as a last resort and much coaching.  Here, creativity was valued and ideas were encouraged.  People recognized each other’s talents and leveraged them for constant growth of the individual and the company.

In my late 20s, working at this company I grew in many ways and made connections hands on world picthat have stayed with me to this day.  I now have a career in higher education because that is where my passion and interests join together.  But, having had a taste of working at a not-for-profit triggered that excitement of knowing I could leave work at the end of the day with an incredible sense of fulfillment.

So, if you are a student with a passion, a desire to lead, a yearning to bring about change and have a natural tendency to truly care, you should consider working for a non-profit or social impact organization.

Please join us on October 9th, 5:30-7 at the Non-Profit and Government Networking Forum in Raytheon Amphitheater, to learn more about the world of non-profits.  This is an opportunity to meet with 14 organizations that are making an impact on education, the environment, the arts, health care, and social enterprise.  You will get to know people within the nonprofit community in Boston who are always happy to help young people interested in using their careers for good.  Also check out the nuCAUSE Careers calendar of events for the fall semester for other opportunities to explore non-profit careers.

Anne Grieves is the Pre-Law and Graduate School Career Advisor at Northeastern University Career Development. A proud ENFP, Anne enjoys helping students explore their career options through various assessment tools and workshops and is a freelance Zumba instructor. To make an appointment with Anne, call 617-373-2430.   

How to Find the Right Provider for Your International Experience

tr-travel-smart-ff-miles-608If during a person’s academic/professional career there is the time and opportunity to go abroad, one must certainly take it and run. As a student, any kind of international experience – whether it be volunteer service, study abroad, or an internship can enhance a resume and help one stand out among a sea of job applicants. To help set up your experience are things called “providers” – organizations that you pay to organize whatever trip you want to go on. Here’s some tips on navigating through the world of travel providers.

1. Narrow down place/time

Are you available for just a week during spring break? Or are you looking to give a year of your life to a cause? Before diving into the search, know the duration that you are able to participate. Do you want to be somewhere warm and tropical? Or in a metropolitan hub? You may not have the exact city and country pinpointed but at least have a continent or region in mind. Also, be realistic about your language capabilities and how that will apply in your destination of choice.

2. Know how you want to contribute

Do you want to make coffee in Costa Rica? Or test for tuberculosis in sub-Saharan Africa? Be specific in the exact field you want to work in and know that the kind of work opportunities available may not be from the comfort of an office.

3. Know your budget range

Consider food, housing, and program fee. Then add on fees for travelling and sight-seeing. Some programs are all-inclusive, some are free in exchange for service, some offer ways to fund your trip. Know exactly what you’re getting out of it and plan ahead before signing on the dotted line.

4. Do a general Internet search, then through a travel search engine

See what you can find on your own through Google and then try a trusted search engine like goabroad.com or goinglobal.com (get access through HuskyCareerLink!). Everything you need to know about “voluntourism” is right at your fingertips, you just have to collect and sift through.

5. Consider providers already partnered with your school/organization

There’s a reason why schools partner up with organizations to send students abroad – good experiences came out of it and trusted connections were formed. Consider options that have already been proven to satisfy.

6. Beware of flashy websites and pictures

Be careful of programs that boast more pictures than words and that seem to promise eternal happiness during this one trip. Know how to look beyond the glitz and attraction of travel and look at what they’re offering with a clear and logical head. Your experience will be much better off for it. A provider must customize your experience, not provide a one-size-fits-all to every traveler.

7. Ensure on-site safety and resources

Are there program staff who you will have access too when you arrive? What are the emergency phone numbers you can contact? The provider you choose should be especially thorough with this; you should always feel safe and taken care of. They should be good with the logistics so that you can enjoy yourself, learn a new culture, and grow professionally!

Angelica is a fourth-year nursing student with a minor in English hailing from New Jersey. She has studied or worked in all the major Boston hospitals. Angelica is also a columnist for The Huntington News and enjoys writing creative non-fiction. 

Photo Source: GeoVisions blog