Email Etiquette For The Reply All-Prone Employee

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This post was written by Emily Brown, a regular contributor to The Works and a graduate student in the College Student Development and Counseling program at Northeastern University. She is also a Career Development Intern. It was originally published on April 23rd, 2014.

Email is often the principal form of communication in business settings.  As you begin co-op or your first post-grad job, keep in mind that how you present yourself via email can contribute to your overall reputation among coworkers. Keeping in mind some simple email etiquette can help ensure you build a positive reputation at the workplace both in person and online.

  • Use an appropriate level of formality – be more formal with higher level professionals, but also mirror others’ email style and address them with the same level (or higher) of formality with which they address you
  • Provide a clear subject line
  • Respond within 24-48 hours
  • Double check that the email is going to the correct person – Autofill isn’t always as helpful as it’s meant to be
  • Acknowledge receipt of emails even if it does not require a response – especially if someone is providing you with information you need
  • Be concise – emails should be short and to the point
  • Number your questions – if you’re asking multiple questions, the person on the receiving end is more likely to read and respond to them all if they’re clearly broken out
  • Include a signature – no one should have to search for your contact information
  • Don’t overuse the high priority function
  • Use “reply all” sparingly and only cc those who need the information
  • If you forward someone an email, include a brief personalized note explaining why
  • Remember, no email is private – once you hit send, you have no control over with whom the email is shared. This is particularly important if you are working for any type of government agency in Massachusetts, in which case email is considered public record.

Image Source: http://www.someecards.com/christmas-cards/email-coworkers-office-holiday-party-work-funny-ecard

While these are generally good rules of thumb, it is also important to be aware of the company culture. Some companies rely more heavily on email for in-office communication than others. If you see coworkers approaching one another with questions, you should probably do the same. To avoid guessing, ask your supervisor about communication preferences when you start the job. And even an in email culture, it’s probably best to use the phone for last minute schedule changes or cancellations.

Emily Brown is a Career Development intern and a graduate student in Northeastern’s College Student Development and Counseling Program. She is a lifelong Bostonian interested in the integration of social media into the professional realm.  Contact her at e.brown@neu.edu.

Introvert? How To Survive in an Extroverted Office (And Vice Versa)

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This guest post was written by Jabril Robinson, a Career Development intern and graduate student in the College Student Development and Counseling program here at NU. It was originally published on The Works blog on August 21st, 2014.

Personality is defined as “the combination of characteristics or qualities that form an individual’s unique character” (Psychology Today). Understanding one’s personality type is crucial, not only in adapting to a workplace environment, but also selecting a workplace to be a member of in the first place. One of the most common examples of personalities comes down to extroversion and introversion. Although these may be widely used terms, I’ve noticed in my experience that relatively few people actually understand what encompasses an introvert or an extrovert, and what essentially makes them different. If you are one of those individuals who find the subject to be perplexing (or just have a general interest), please read on!

Q: What is the difference between an Introvert and an Extrovert?

A: Introvert: Not surprisingly, introverts are re-energized by having “alone time”. Even when working with small groups of people, they can be quickly overwhelmed by unfamiliar situations or surroundings. Depending on the situation, a large crowd of people can be an instant red flag to an introvert. When it comes to work, introverts prefer to concentrate on one task at a time, and observe a situation (or group of people) in advance, before jumping in.

Careers that promote the strengths of introverts include scientists, writers, and artists. Famous examples of introverts include actress Julia Roberts, actor Clint Eastwood, host David Letterman, and author J.K Rowling.

A: Extrovert: Often referred to as “social butterflies”, extroverts make a living through social stimulation. They focus on elements of the external environment (in contrast to an introvert’s inner mental realm), such as the people on activities around them. Extroverts thrive in active, fast-paced jobs, such as sales, teaching, and politics, where skills such as adaptability, problem-solving, and quick decision-making are critical. Extroverts learn firsthand by doing, and prefer to talk through ideas and solutions. Multitasking is an extrovert’s bread and butter.

Famous examples of extroverts include Oprah Winfrey, President Barack Obama, actor Tom Hanks, and former NBA player Michael Jordan.

Q: Are there misconceptions regarding Introverts or Extroverts?

A: Indeed! For instance, shyness is a trait commonly used to describe introverts. Firstly, both introverts and extroverts can be shy. Shyness is essentially a feeling of uneasiness of anxiety experienced in social situations. Here’s the key difference between shyness and introversion: while introverts prefer less social stimulation, shy people often desire social interaction, yet avoid it for fear of being rejected or criticized. Boom! Introverts rejoice!

A misconception involving extroversion is that all extroverts are loud, annoying, and talk too much. While this may be true for some individuals, not all extroverts are such. Extroverts simply prefer to think out loud, whereas an introvert may do more internal thinking before speaking–just a style difference.

There are several other misunderstandings when defining introversion and extroversion, which brings me to my next point….

To be a successful employee, it is crucial to understand not only yourself, but also the personalities of those around you in the workplace. Issues can arise when introverts and extroverts interact. Introverts may see extroverts as bossy, while an extrovert may see an introvert as shy or withdrawn. Whether an introvert or extrovert, here’s some advice that may help you understand what is going on across the fence:

What extroverts should know about their introverted colleagues:

1) If we need alone time, it is not because we don’t like you, rather because we need it–don’t take that as a personal insult.

2) If you want to hear our opinion, please be patient. We aren’t in a rush to speak up–we know we will have our turn eventually.

3) We are not lonely people, but we are choosy about who we associate ourselves with. If you try to turn us into extroverts, you will not be one of those people!

What introverts should know about their extroverted colleagues:

1) If we try to get you to loosen up, we aren’t doing so to annoy you. Honestly, we mean well.

2) If you are struggling with small talk, we can help with that–it is a useful skill, whether you like it or not.

3) We are not all the same–just like introverts. There are extroverts who have a quiet side too–you just have to keep an open mind.

Not sure where you fit on the extroversion/introversion spectrum? Set up an hour-long appointment with a counselor in the Office of Career Development! Utilizing personality assessments, we can help you identify your strengths, weaknesses, and what career paths may best serve your abilities.

Jabril Robinson is a Career Development Intern at Northeastern University. He has a growing interest in personality assessment, such as Strengthsquest, True Colors, and several others. Currently enrolled in Northeastern University’s College Student Development & Counseling Program, Jabril seeks a Master’s degree within student affairs. Send him an email at j.robinson@neu.edu!

Welcome To The December Co-Op Crash Course

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In case you still haven’t turned the page on your calendar yet, December is here in a big confusing 50-degree way. November has passed – you can’t even look at mashed potatoes any more and you’re shamelessly blasting those Sam Smith Christmas covers like they’re going out of style (which, they will be on December 26th).

Here at Career Development, we’re excited to fill your Christmas break with awesome career tips and tricks –

Welcome to the December Co-Op Crash Course!

For the next couple of weeks we will be sharing and over-sharing about the do’s and don’ts of office culture, email etiquette, and more.

Basically, by the end of this, you’re going to be the best co-op ever.

Welcome.

Join us tomorrow for our first post of the series!

Finding an Internship Without Prior Experience

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source: collegefashion.net

source: collegefashion.net

This guest post was written by Sam Carkin, a middler studying Marketing and Interactive Media. This article was originally posted on The Works on February 24, 2014.

The “real world” can be intimidating; especially when you’re just starting out. Sure, that first job as a house painter or bus boy is great for earning some money and learning to work with others, but I am assuming if you came to Northeastern you are looking to do something within your major. Northeastern is special in the sense that co-op allows you to work within your major prior to graduation, but what if you want some experience for your résumé before applying to that first co-op job? A summer internship right after your freshman year is an awesome way to go, and something I had the opportunity to do last summer with integrated marketing firm GY&K. Below, is some strategies I used for landing that internship where I gained experience in the marketing and advertising field before my first co-op (which will begin in July).

1. Network, network, network:  I visited a family friend who worked at a huge marketing agency called Arnold Worldwide. He had been in the industry a while and agreed to introduce me to an employee at GY&K, the person who ultimately offered me the internship. Ask your parents, ask your friends, find SOMEONE that works in your industry of choice and ask them if they know anyone that you might be able to talk to or work for.

2. Informational Interviews are kEY: OK, so I had been introduced to this person from GY&K, but what now? An informational interview is a perfect way to demonstrate professionalism and interest, while also learning a great deal from someone who knows the industry well. If it goes well, you have a better chance of possibly working for the person you speak with.

3. Have confidence: Going in to speak with an industry professional can be extremely intimidating; however, setting up informational interviews shows that you are genuinely interested in what that person does and see them as a successful individual in their field. They will be just as excited to tell you what they know as you are to learn, and it should be treated as a casual conversation during which you can make a great first impression.

4. Do not be afraid to ask: If your interview went well, at the end feel free to ask if that professional’s company has any opportunities for you to gain experience, or if they know of any other companies that might have these opportunities. It will allow you to possibly find that internship position, or continue to grow your network.

Sam Carkin is currently in his 3rd year at Northeastern University. He is a dual major of Business Administration-Marketing and Interactive Media and will be finishing up his first co-op this month. Feel free to contact him at carkin.s@husky.neu.edu with any questions related to the blog post or his experiences.

What I Learned in Spain

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spainThis guest post was written by Christina Kach, an NU alum who holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Engineering and is currently pursuing a Master’s Degree in Engineering Management at NU. This post originally appeared on catchcareers.com and was re-posted with permission for the author. 

I recently had the chance to go to Madrid for a two week work assignment and I loved every minute of it. The new group of people I got to meet and work with, a new city to explore, a challenging new work assignment.  During those two weeks, I learned a great deal – both personally and professionally. Here are a few of my reflections from the trip:

Experiencing life – For a long time I’ve been a believer of getting out into the world, exploring, and going on adventures to experience new things. This trip to Spain was no exception. I got out as much as I could to see the city of Madrid. We can get used to our everyday lives and forget there is so much more to explore and spark a curiosity for life.

Getting outside your comfort zone – octopus, blood sausage, anchovies…those are just a few of the new foods I tried during the trip. Our comfort zone may be our happy place, where we feel confident and at ease but it is so much more fun and so much better for our learning, in life and at work, to go beyond. I believe that part of my rich experience of the trip was my willingness to try the new (my first go at espresso) and my new stories to add to my life (of that time I had my first espresso).

Being grounded – With so many fun distractions in an exciting city, it can be hard to concentrate. At times the trip felt a little like a school field trip and a little like a vacation, but I was still there for work. I still had to remain focused at the task at hand to be a good teammate and employee. For me, I just reminded myself of why I was there, to do a good job for my team and the team in Spain, and any extra time to explore was just a wonderful bonus. I also made sure I stayed healthy by working out, eating well, and getting sleep.

Appreciating other ways of life – In high school, my Spanish teacher taught us not just the language but about the culture. While I knew a little of the culture going into the trip, actually getting to live right in it was eye opening. I think this was the most interesting part of the trip and my favorite learning – seeing another culture and a new country. I hope I get to do more of this world exploring in my life.

You can survive without Wi-Fi –I had Wi-Fi in the hotel – so I was able to stay connected to family, friends, U.S. news and emails.  When I ventured outside the hotel – Wi-Fi no longer, I was on my own. That meant navigating the Metro, streets, menus, and everything else without having my phone available to check. And I was fine. I knew enough Spanish I was able to translate words, the metro map was easy, and the bus tour I took helped me recognize landmarks for navigation. It felt good to do it all on my own without googling every question that came my way. And it reminded me of when people actually talked out issues vs. just looking them up immediately.

Do you have any travel experiences that have enriched your life like Spain did for me?

Christina Kach is an Associate Consultant on the Continuous Improvement team for a financial services company in Boston, MA. Prior to this role, she spent five years at a Government Defense Company focusing on Lean and process improvement in a manufacturing environment, while also completing an Operations Leadership Development Program. Christina holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Engineering from Northeastern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s Degree in Engineering Management, also from Northeastern.

Christina invites you to connect with her via Twitter (@ChristinaKach), email (Cfkach@gmail.com) or at her blog for young professionals www.catchcareers.com

Image source: Selfemployedinspain.com

How to Work or Learn Remotely

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laptop_park-18973In 2014, there is no longer a traditional classroom or workplace. One can write, design, interview, build, create, connect, trade, etc. from the comfort of their own home or in a coffee shop or hotel lobby behind a familiar laptop screen. University degrees can be earned without ever physically meeting a professor. While this may all seem daunting or exciting, structure is still necessary to be productive in a flexible environment and schedule.

1. Have the connection basics toolkit

This includes having at least two email addresses – one for school and one for work that you check regularly. Since no face-to-face contact is being made, email is the number one mode of communication and should be checked and updated multiple times a day. Install an email application on your phone so that emails can be sent and received when you’re on the go. A working cell phone number and Skype username are also two important tools to have to speak directly and conference call with multiple people if necessary.

2. Set up a designated space

Have a clutter-free area where you regularly return to study or work. This space can also be outside of your home if you can guarantee you can access that space regularly like in a library. If at home, utilize memo boards and post-it’s to create an organized and inspirational environment.

3. Follow a schedule and stick to it

The freedom that working or studying from home provides can be deceiving. With deadlines and online exams or assignments and no professor or supervisor to remind you in person, you could lose track of time. Designate a work day or time frame. For example, if assignments are usually due Sunday, promise yourself to work and submit by Friday. The balance of work and personal life is delicate in these situations as well.

4. Don’t forget to check in!

You can still participate in a community presence online! Take advantage of discussion boards when you have a question in class and post questions and interact with fellow classmates. Ask for help from co-workers or team up using many of the new applications out there that facilitate virtual transactions of work and knowledge like GoToMeeting. There are features like recording and the use of a planning board to give participants a truly interactive experience.

5. Take advantage of Lynda and Skillshare

Lynda is online software training available for free for all Northeastern students via MyNEU. Want to learn how to use InDesign but don’t want to take a formal class? Lynda is the way to go.

Skillshare is an online community where experts teach project-based classes in subjects as varied as marketing to guitar. Boost your resume with skills in design or pick up a hobby you’ve always wanted to try. Anyone can access the site for free and members can pay a small additional fee for unlimited and bonus access. Complement your current work or class with a new skill.

Angelica is a fourth-​​year nursing student with a minor in English hailing from New Jersey. She has studied or worked in all the major Boston hospitals. Angelica is also a columnist for The Hunt­ington News and enjoys writing creative non-​​fiction.

Image source: Virgin Entrepreneur; Nearly half of UK office workers can now work remotely

How To Find A Co-Op: My Journey As An International Student

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My name is Maria from Venezuela and I am doing a Master in Project Management through the College of Professional Studies. I am writing today because I want to help the international community at Northeastern fight the odds that all foreign students face in the United States.

I have heard many times that finding a good paid coop for an international is very difficult. Well, I disagree with that statement. I will give you a few tips that will help you to find a Coop/Internship.

Set your goal ahead of time. If you put your mind and energy in finding a coop you will get it.

Start four months before the date you want to begin. The earlier, the better.

Write a resume with the USA standards. I highly recommend you to go the Career Development Office. They will also help you with cover letters.

Create a good LinkedIn profile. Here is a link to mine.

Make business cards. This is a technique that can help differentiate yourself from others candidates. You can use Vistaprint to make them.

Start the job search: MyNEU COOL, NU Career Development website, companies’ websites, networking, career fairs, etc. You should try all of them. The university has partnerships with many companies that you can apply to. You can also speak to your friends, classmates and professors and let them know you are looking for a co-op. You will be surprised.

Apply, apply, apply and apply. Many students think that applying to just 10 companies is enough. There is no enough. You end your co-op search when you find the correct one.

You need to work harder. Remember that domestic students have two advantages: English as their first language and infinite job permission. So, it is time to show how good you are.

You will need to find your co-op with time. After you get your co-op, you will need your co-op advisor’s permission and then the ISSI permission to issue a new I-20.

Many students ask themselves what the difference between a coop and internship is. An internship is part-time job (paid or unpaid). On the other hand, a co-op is full time and, in most cases, is paid.

All these tips may look very similar to others you can find online, but they really worked for me. If you focus in what you really want there will be no obstacles you cannot overcome. Lastly, you will really need a positive attitude because you will receive rejections from many companies until you finally get your co-op.

Maria Martin is a Venezuelan Master’s Degree student. She is currently doing a full time paid coop at NSTAR in the Marketing and Sales Department. You can contact her at mariajesusmartin13@gmail.com

Company Holiday Parties: A Survival Guide

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allow-apologize-advance-going-christmas-ecard-someecardsThis guest post was written by graduate candidate and full time professional, Kristina Swope.

It’s that time of the year where everyone’s full of joy, love, and gratitude. It’s a time to reflect on the last 12 months, be thankful, and let others know that they are appreciated. Considering you spend 40+ hours per week with the same people, why not share that appreciation with your coworkers at a holiday party?

It sounds innocent enough. You say, “it’ll be fun”, “I won’t drink that much”, or “I’ll be careful.” It always sounds like a great plan, yet before you know it, you wake up the next day and realize you sang Lady Gaga karaoke with your divisional leader in front of the whole company. You’ll hide under the covers in shame, convinced you can never emerge from the depths of cotton. You don’t realize there are more details coming Monday that will further shame you. For example, hearing that you stood in front of the artificial smoke machine screaming “HOOOOOOO!” a la Michael Jackson. It might sound amusing, but that’s only because it happened to me instead of you.

While it was fun, in hindsight, I wish I had just been a normal person at that party. Instead, I started off my career with embarrassing party behavior that will haunt me forever. Reason being, it completely changed the dynamic in the office afterwards with coworkers now seeing me as the fun, silly, goofy one instead of as a committed member of the team.

To prevent this from happening to you, here are a few a suggestions for surviving a company holiday party:

  1. Don’t “go hard”. If you’re old enough to have a big kid job, you’re old enough to drink responsibly and be aware of how much you can consume without making a complete fool of yourself. Excess consumption is just not worth the risk of saying something you won’t remember or being unsafe; stay within your limits.
  2. Don’t completely let loose verbally. Your coworkers don’t need to hear you swear 1,700 times or hear about super personal events just because you aren’t in the office. Remember that, despite the casual environment, you’re still with coworkers and need to keep that line of respect if you want the dynamic to be normal on Monday.
  3. Don’t sing or dance “seriously”. Just don’t. Unless you are the second coming of Adele or you are an adorably awkward dancer like Taylor Swift, just avoid it entirely. Chances are you think you’re doing way better than you actually are, and you don’t want to ruin a song for yourself by linking it to your corporate humiliation.

  4. Do thank your CEO before either of you leave. Company parties are not required. It’s extremely generous for CEOs to throw a party with free food and beverages for his/her employees, and it’s incredibly important that they are thanked by everyone for it. Just as we appreciate positive reinforcement, they should also hear how much their efforts are appreciated.
  5. Do get to know new coworkers. Whether they’re new to the company or just new to you, this is a perfect opportunity to get to know one another in a less buttoned-up environment. Mingling outside of your comfort zone makes the party more fun and overall more interesting – and who knows, you might even make a new friend!
  6. Do keep the buddy system. It’s a common assumption that because it’s a company party versus going out with friends that you can abandon the famous buddy system rule – this is not true! In fact, without friends you intentionally came with, it’s even more important that you’re looking out for one another. Always let a coworker you’re friends with know when you’re leaving the party and when you’ve gotten home safely, and ask the same of them.

Kristina is a full-time Market Research Project Manager in Philadelphia and a full-time student at NU pursuing a Master of Science in Organization and Corporate Communication, with a concentration in Leadership. Check out her LinkedIn profile here.  

On-Boarding Documents, Or How To Make A Great Last Impression

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DeathtoStock_Creative Community1

People generally understand the importance of a great first impression – you want to kick your first day off with a smile and a firm handshake and a solid, confident grasp of office small talk. But we don’t often talk about creating an awesome last impression. What do you do during your last week to make your employers remember you?

Hint: Make their job easier by creating on-boarding documents for your replacement.

Here are a few tips for making your on-boarding documents awesome:

  1. Walk through your day. This is best done a couple of weeks before the end of your internship. Walk through your day and make a note of everything you do – what does your schedule look like? Who do you talk to? What projects do you prioritize? Break down your day into any and all tasks the new person might not know how to do and add them to a running list.
  1. Take your time. Mark off a day on your calendar for making on-boarding docs. This will allow you to sit down, put on some pump-up jams, and do a killer job. This is a working document, so send the file to your replacement so they can edit it and send it to their replacement. You’re leaving your legacy right now.
  1. Be specific. Assume nothing. What emails do you send in a day? When I worked in events, I wrote an on-boarding doc with a whole section for how to keep in contact with caterers. I took screenshots of spreadsheets I kept, email templates, suggestions for how much to order from where, and the name and number of any contacts I had established. This ensures that anything and everything is accounted for.
  1. Include anything they might find useful. This might include: common abbreviations no one explains to you, office acronyms, or an “email decoder” (this is important especially for tech co-ops or companies where jargon runs rampant).
  1. Include a contact sheet. Basically, a whole sheet should be dedicated to who does what around the office. Question about this? Ask Tom. Question about this? Ask Victoria. Question about this? Ask Kate. This proves incredibly helpful and will prepare the upcoming co-op for success from day one.
  1. Be appropriate. Duh? Your employer can (and probably will) read this. Be classy.

On-boarding docs are a good way to refresh your memory and reflect on your responsibilities throughout the past six months. They also show your employer that, yes, you were working for six months. In fact, you were doing an excellent job for six months. And you’re going to make sure your replacement also does an excellent job because you’re just that kind of person.

And that last impression goes far.

Lindsey Sampson is a junior International Affairs major with minors in Social Entrepreneurship and Writing. She enjoys writing about Millennials in the workplace and social media as a marketing tool. Follow her blog here and on Twitter @lindseygsampson.

10 Mistakes Millennials Make in the Job Search (and how to avoid them)

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whoopsThis was originally posted on LinkedIn November 24, 2014. Re-posted with permission from author and NU alumna Alexandra Anweiler Stephens. 

This month, two recruiters from two very different industries visited our staff meeting to share their insider perspectives on hiring millennials. Katie Maillet, campus recruiter at Waltham-based Constant Contact, and Veronica Thomas, vice president of talent acquisition for commercial programs at RBS Citizens, discussed strategies for recruiting new talent in the digital age – from using social media to increasing diversity – and how we can better prepare our students for success.

I wanted to share the takeaways from this discussion more broadly, so I’ve compiled a list of 10 common mistakes that millennials make during the recruiting process – and how they can be avoided.

1. You don’t follow directions. The job/internship application is your first opportunity to show a potential employer what you’re made of, so read the instructions carefully! Usually, employers will require a resume and cover letter, but other times you may be asked to complete a project, respond to short answer questions or make your way through another screening mechanism. Read the job description and the application requirements thoroughly to avoid getting weeded out in the first round.

2. You don’t do your research. Rule of thumb: If the answer to your question can be found on the About page of the company website, don’t ask it. Recruiters talk to applicants all day long about their company, open positions, and why it’s a great place to work. Make their lives easier – and show you’re a serious contender – by doing your homework on the company, role and field/industry ahead of time. The company’s website, social media accounts and Google alerts are great places to find interesting information you can reference in your interactions. If you are invited to interview, request the names of your interviewers in advance so you can look them up on LinkedIn – you might find you have a connection in common. Another lesser known resource is Glassdoor.com, a growing database of six million company reviews, salary reports, interview reviews and questions – all shared by current and former employees.

3. You don’t update your privacy settings on social media. Millennials have grown up with social media and remember when it was used for only social purposes. Those days are long gone, and employers are doing their research, too. Despite the many warnings out there, employers still see negative posts about former employers, photos of candidates with red solo cups, and other no-no’s. Think twice about what you post on Facebook and Twitter, and don’t forget about other searchable platforms like Instagram, Vine and YouTube. Then take a few minutes to look at them through the eyes of a potential employer and adjust your privacy settings accordingly.

4. Your email address / voicemail greeting is weird. Your email address itself is a part of your professional brand. Keep it professional by using your college email address or creating an account through Gmail with your first and last name. Though so much communication happens via email, don’t forget about the phone. Your voicemail is also an important part of your professional brand and as such you should treat it with care. In your greeting, clearly state your full name so that callers know they’ve reached the right person. It may go without saying, but ring-backs are a no-no (yes, some people are still using ring-backs). One recruiter suggested using Google Voice to customize and manage your phone number(s), voicemail greetings and messages.

5. You hand out your business card at a career fair. Resume? Yes. Business card? No. This isn’t the worst mistake in the world, but many recruiters don’t want your business card. It is small, it gets dropped, and it is redundant if they already have your resume. Hold on to your business cards for networking nights and other professional events where dishing out your resume isn’t appropriate.

6. You do phone screens on the go. We’re all busy – and millennials are the consummate multi-taskers – but the line needs to be drawn somewhere. If you conduct a phone screen with a recruiter as you’re walking to class, they can hear you huffing and puffing on the line. And it’s never okay to ask the recruiter to hold because you’re getting another call (yes, this has happened). Your interviewer is dedicating valuable time to evaluate your candidacy. Show respect and interest in the position by giving them your full attention. If your mobile connection can be spotty, use a landline to conduct your interview. Many career offices have interview rooms that you can reserve for this purpose.

7. You sell yourself short in interviews. Unfortunately, this is particularly true for females. Our recruiters reported that women have a tendency to use “we” when describing their accomplishments, and men tend to use “I.” While it is important to convey your ability to work as part of a team, it is even more important to understand and communicate your individual contributions, responsibilities and accomplishments. One recruiter even suggested leaving phrases like “contributed to” and “collaborated with” off your resume.

8. You treat your recruiter like your new BFF. A recruiter often communicates with a candidate throughout the recruiting process, from first meeting at the career fair to making the job/internship offer (if all goes according to plan). These communications may be frequent – especially if there are a series of interviews – and the recruiter may coach you on what to expect at different parts of the process. This doesn’t mean that you’re friends, or that your interactions can become more casual as time goes on. Our recruiters have found that millennials tend to use slang in email and over the phone as they become more familiar. Instead of fostering a stronger relationship, it can lead to the opposite. Always err on the side of professionalism.

9. You don’t ask for your interviewer’s business card. As mentioned above, recruiters may tell you about next steps in the process, and are often open to answering questions you may have along the way. But there is one question they don’t appreciate: “What was the name of the person who interviewed me?” This is a big no-no, and is most certainly avoidable. When the adrenaline is rushing, it’s easy to forget your interviewer’s name. The solution? Always ask for your interviewer’s business card. You’ll need their email address to send them a thank you, too.

10. You forget to say thank you. Saying thank you is a must after every interaction in the hiring process, but which is better: email or handwritten note? Our recruiters recommend sending both, and here’s why. Email is the most efficient means – it arrives instantly, doesn’t get lost in the mail, and is easily forwarded to hiring managers and other influencers. Send an email within 24 hours to thank the interviewer(s) for their time and confirm your continued interest in the position. Be sure to reference an interesting anecdote from your conversation, too. While it may seem obsolete, a handwritten note as a follow-up to your email can set you apart from the rest. Our recruiters said that handwritten cards show that a candidate has gone the extra mile, and also serve as a subtle reminder to follow up with the candidate. Mail a handwritten note about a week after your interview, and use it as an opportunity to remind the recruiter about your candidacy and reference a new piece of information, like a recent article you read about the company. Because they are few and far between, our recruiters said they save these notes and even show them off to colleagues. Who wouldn’t want that?

Alexandra Stephens is the associate director of alumni career programs and engagement at the Hiatt Career Center at Brandeis University. Prior to her transition into higher education, Alexandra worked in marketing and communications at Rosie’s Place and Constant Contact. She graduated summa cum laude from Northeastern University with a B.A. in Communication Studies.

Image Source: UT Austin Career Center Bits, 3 Big Career Mistakes Millennials Make