SaraDorisBookCover

617.373.7701
311 Ryder
s.doris@neu.edu

Sara Doris

Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art History
 – Art History

Sara Doris joined the faculty of Northeastern University’s Department of Art + Design as Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art in the fall of 2007. Prior to receiving her Ph.D. in 20th Century Art from Northwestern University, she received her M.A. in art history from Rutgers University and a B.F.A. in painting from Cornell University. Her research focuses on the emergence and evolution of postmodern visual art and culture during the late 20th and early 21st century, with an emphasis on their increasing interdependence due to the shared impact of new visual technologies. This is evidenced in her recent book Pop Art and the Contest over American Culture (Cambridge University Press: 2007), which explored the impact of that movement on the development of postmodern culture. Her current research extends that inquiry into the decades following 1970, when visual art and culture were increasingly impacted by the emergence of digital communications technologies. She is currently at work on essays addressing the impact of the communication theories of Marshall McLuhan as well as a case study of the visual culture of the U.S. pavilion at Expo ’67, an early instance of the postmodern fusion of high and low, as well as pre- and post-industrial cultural objects. These essays form the foundation of her new book project, which explores the impact of new communication technologies, and the theories they inspire, on the evolution of contemporary visual art and culture. She has made public presentations of her research at the annual conferences of the College Art Association, the Southeastern College Art Conference, and the Popular Culture Association as well as the Smithsonian Institution. She has taught lecture courses and seminars on modern and contemporary art to undergraduate and graduate students majoring in art history, studio art and design at various institutions including the University of Memphis, the University of Kentucky, Catholic University of America, and American University.