Gloria Sutton

617.373.5498
389 Ryder
g.sutton@neu.edu

Gloria Sutton

Assistant Professor – Art History

Gloria Sutton is Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art History and New Media at Northeastern University in Boston. She received her PhD from the University of California Los Angeles and was a fellow at the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program and the Getty Research Institute. Gloria’s teaching and research focus on time-based media practices and a critical history of technological experiments within visual art.

In particular, her scholarship suggests that Expanded Cinema practices did not hinge on developments in film, or more aptly, cinema, but on the introduction of network-based models of communication that allowed for the real-time transmission of images. These concerns are the subject of her current book, The Experience Machine: Stan VanDerBeek’s Movie-Drome and Expanded Cinema Practices (under contract to the MIT Press). Her scholarship in this area also appears in Mainframe Experimentalism: Early Digital Computing and the Experimental Arts (University of California Press, 2012) and Future Cinema: The Cinematic Imaginary after Film (MIT Press, 2003).

She has contributed to Afterimage, Art Bulletin, Art in America, and Rhizome.org, and has published numerous exhibition catalogue essays on artists including Kirsten Everberg (Pomona College Museum of Art, 2013), Renée Green (Musée Cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, 2009), Karl Haendel (Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, 2006), Carsten Höller (New Museum, 2011), Laura Owens (Kunsthalle Zurich, 2006), Kerry Tribe (American Academy Berlin, 2006), as well as Ice Cream: Contemporary Art in Culture (Phaidon, 2007) and Vitamin Ph, New Perspectives in Photography (Phaidon, 2006).

Gloria has also curated exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art and the MAK Center for Art and Architecture in Los Angeles and Ars Electronica in Linz, Austria and has been invited to lecture at the New Museum in New York, MIT’s Program in Art Culture and Technology, Carleton College in Minnesota, San Francisco Art Institute, Contemporary Art Museum Houston, and Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art (INHA) in Paris.