Research Topics Fall 2015

  • South Station Connect / Dietmar Offenhuber and TBD
  • Northeastern-Stanford University Collaboration: Changing Workplaces in the Information Age / Kristian Kloeckl (Northeastern University) and Bryan Shiles (Stanford University)
  • The Hybrid High-rise in the Historic City Center / Blake Middleton and TBD
  • Granny Flats, Alley Housing, and Accessory Dwelling Units / Matthew Littell

 

South Station Connect / Dietmar Offenhuber and TBD

ARTG 6900 Special Topics in Information Design (4 SH) for IDV students
ARCH 7130 Master’s Research Studio (6 SH) for Architecture Students

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) of the School of Architecture and the Master of Fine Arts in Information Design and Visualization (IDV) of the Department of Art+Design plan to run parallel and coordinated studios in the fall of 2015. The courses will focus on Boston’s South Station and analyze issues related to flows of people, information and vehicles, at a critical location that functions as a connecting gateway between the city and its surroundings as well as adjacent city districts, such as the emerging Fort Points and Innovation District at Seaport. The station’s current articulation both physical as well as in terms of information flows stymies its potential role as an urban mediator and hub as well as better connections between different means of transport (rail, bus, subway, bike, etc.) at what is the most important multi-modal transportation hub in New England.

The project is based on a thick mapping exercise of a complex, multilayered public space, including its diverse structures and flows, the social presence and practices of its users, its governance, and its sensory qualities. In analogy to Clifford Geerz’s method of thick description, thick mapping is not only concerned with raw data collected from the environment, but also the context of these data, as well as a representation and reflection of the data collection method. The research design, considering issues of scalability, validity and representation, is a central element of the creative effort.

The project will include a workshop with the Sound artist Sam Auinger, who has been working on the relationship between hearing, spatial perception and the built environment for over twenty years.

The students will collect and analyze data to better understand the dynamics of the various types of flows through and surrounding South Station (schedules, passenger movements, vehicle movements, economic and cultural activity, etc.) and develop concepts and prototypes that help to better integrate the various flows.

Beyond the analysis, the architecture students in the Graduate Research Studio will explore potential physical improvements that will better connect and integrate passenger flows across all means of transport and leverage the station as an urban hub within its geographic and cultural context within the city. Policy makers have recently argued that through-service will dramatically improve rail service capacity and efficiencies. They will also study the architectural implications of the north-south rail link on the proposed expansion of South Station.

 

Northeastern-Stanford University Collaboration: Changing Workplaces in the Information Age / Kristian Kloeckl (Northeastern University) and Bryan Shiles (Stanford University)

ARTG 6900 Special Topics in Information Design (4 SH) for IDV students
ARCH 7130 Master’s Research Studio (6 SH) for Architecture Students

Changing work modalities in the creative industries as well as the increasing pervasiveness of digital technologies in cities has brought about dramatic change in how we conceive and design workplaces today and how they interact with their urban surroundings. The creative workplace has been widely adopted by today’s most innovative organizations, which are increasingly setting their sights on cities like San Francisco and Boston.

This course will combine research, conceptual explorations, studio design work, seminars and guest lectures to explore the impact of the changing workplace on the morphology of the city by examining these bi-coastal seats of innovation. As the creative workplace continues to evolve, how will it engage the public realm within both well-established urban frameworks such as San Francisco and Boston, and emerging suburban contexts, such as Silicon Valley?

A full academic year in length, the course will join graduate students from the Northeastern University School of Architecture with students from the Stanford University Architectural Design program. Students will reside primarily at their prospective universities and will travel selectively for site research, team charrettes and project reviews. Project sites on both coasts will be utilized for research and studio work. This is an opportunity for students from two top universities, both situated in the epicenters of workplace change, to explore and conduct valuable research on an issue that is changing their urban environments.

 

The Hybrid High-rise in the Historic City Center / Blake Middleton and TBD

The quintessential American building type – the urban high-rise – has had a fitful evolution in Boston. But today the city is experiencing a resurgence of high-rise ambition, with remarkable tall towers being proposed on the waterfront, Downtown, and in the Back Bay. Significantly, many of these buildings include multi-family housing as a key component of their design. These residential mixed-use, high-rise developments might be considered a new paradigm: the Hybrid High Rise, a complex typology of form and function that has re-emerged in the last several decades in the U.S. and elsewhere as a successful model for urban redevelopment.

The High Rise Studio is a laboratory to explore and assess the formal, functional, and economic attributes of the Hybrid High-Rise. The Studio will critically examine a host of questions: What issues are at play in the design, implementation, approval, and execution of a high-rise building in the 21st century? What are the forces that shape the building, and how does one arrive at a coherent solution that creates a suitable image, appropriate contextual response, and fulfills the programmatic expectations of the User?

During the Fall Studio, through rigorous analytical research, students will uncover and learn how the attributes and components of the high-rise work. A weekly overview of the evolution of the Hybrid High Rise will accompany a critical analytical assessment of high-rise design fundamentals. Through graphic and metric analysis, students will develop a compendium of the formal, programmatic, and typological issues found in most residential Hybrid High-Rise buildings.

The Spring Studio will be “applied research” – taking the knowledge gained and applying it in a design case study on several sites to develop a design concept with a specific program. Design fundamentals to be explored include “core and shell”, high-rise sustainable design basics, the impact of lateral forces on building form, and how the building engages the ground plane and the public realm of the street.

Basic issues will constantly be assessed during the Studio, including complex program sorting (public sequence, private connections, servicing), resolving environmental imperatives (lateral forces, sustainable design), urban design (building morphology at city, neighborhood, and street scale), and architectural image (the façade “suit”, how it fits to the frame, and perception on the skyline). Experts in high-rise design – structural, mechanical, and environmental engineers, as well as leading architects – will periodically review Studio analyses and design proposals, providing critical insight and guidance for students to refine their design concepts.

 

Granny Flats, Alley Housing, and Accessory Dwelling Units / Matthew Littell

In 2010, the zoning code of Portland, Oregon was revised to incentivize Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU’s) as a way to deal with the City’s housing affordability crisis. Rather than promote high-rise construction as a way to increase the housing supply, as has been the unofficial policy in Boston, city planners in Portland wanted to encourage the conversion of garages and construction of small (up to 800 SF) houses in the backyards of existing single family homes. In addition, to allowing units up to a certain size as-of-right, the new code also waived the development fees typical for conventional development projects. The program has been highly successful. In 2012, 200 of the 800 new units built in the City were accessory dwelling units[1].

The question for the research studio is whether certain neighborhoods in the Boston metro area would be suitable for a similar program, both because of existing urban patterns and the real estate market. Research topics during the fall would include an analysis of potential nearby cities and neighborhoods to determine three case studies for more detailed study, the analysis of ADU zoning in Portland, Santa Cruz, CA, and Austin, TX, the other cities in the United States that encourage the construction of accessory dwelling units, and potential construction, financing, and project delivery models. The goal of the research initiative will be a guide book that will a) identify the best neighborhoods for the program, b) outline urban design strategies for integrating the structures into existing neighborhoods, c) recommended zoning language, d) financing strategies, e) project delivery strategies, and f) a menu of design strategies for designing a fully functional 500 to 800 SF home.

In the spring, students will select a neighborhood and design three ADU’s that demonstrate the range of urban design issues of the specific context and a specific construction and project delivery strategy. Depending on funding and interest, there might be a design/build component to the spring studio.

[1] See “Grandma Never Had It So Good” by Sandy Keenen in the Home section of the New York Times, May 8, 2014, pg. D1 and D7.

 

 

M.Arch 1

This program gives eligible candidates the opportunity to get a NAAB-accredited Master of Architecture degree in one year.

The final degree project in the design studio offers an opportunity to leverage research conducted in the first semester with real innovation in new hybrid types, strategic alterations of existing ones, and to take on the challenge of finding prototypical solutions for systematic problems.

Course Description

Combining aspects of the conventional “option studio” taught by visiting critics and the thesis studio, the graduate research studio provides an opportunity for students to work together to do directed research on a topic that is highly relevant to the discipline and emerging trends in real estate development, planning policy, and/or culture. Each summer, the full-time Northeastern faculty considers new research topics for the following year. The criteria for selection includes the relevance of the topic and the potential for the resulting research to yield a wide range of architectural issues that can be mined when students do their independent projects during the Spring semester. Students are assigned their topic by a lottery that is held on the first day of class. Each instructor will make a presentation outlining the research topic, its relevance, and some of the issues that will be explored during the semester.

The most important deliverable of the semester is a published “guide book” that includes both comprehensive research on the topic and a potential framework for innovative design speculation. The book is due a few weeks before the end of the semester to allow time for each student to elaborate on one of the speculative themes as a potential subject and scope for their spring studio project. 

Course Sequence (32 Credits)

FALL

SPRING

M.Arch 2

This program offers students who have earned a BS in Architecture from an institution other than Northeastern to engage in the urban-focused curriculum that is offered at the School of Architecture.

YEAR ONE

In the Urban Housing Studio, students learn to develop new patterns of housing for specific Boston sites and to develop those sites with their own individual interventions. The Comprehensive Design Studio challenges the students to consider architectural connections at all scales, from the nut and bolt to the scale of the door or window to the scale of the whole building and the city. Additionally, students take classes in technology as well as architecture seminars.

YEAR TWO

In the second year, students engage in a research project based on topics chosen by the graduate faculty. Team research is conducted and complied into a published book. This book and the related work serve as the foundation of individual projects. The final degree project offers an opportunity to leverage research conducted in the first semester with real innovation in new hybrid types, strategic alterations of existing ones, and to take on the challenge of finding prototypical solutions for systemic problems.

COURSE SEQUENCE (60-68 credits)

FALL, YEAR ONE

SPRING, YEAR ONE

FALL, YEAR TWO

SPRING, YEAR TWO

M.Arch 3

The professional 3-¼ year M.Arch program prepares students who come from a variety of disciplines with degrees in other fields for a career in architecture. Advanced placement is also available for students with an architecture background but do not have the necessary design skills or coursework to be eligible for our 2-year program.

The program requires three years and a summer to complete. Students may spend a semester at the School’s Berlin program (optional) and have the option to enroll in summer coops. After completing an accelerated introductory curriculum, graduate students in the 3-¼ year M.Arch program will merge into the existing curriculum for the M.Arch program.

YEAR ONE

In the first year, students take intensive studios, technology classes, and architectural history classes to immerse them in the studio culture of the school and to give them a strong foundation to begin the upper level studios. The Grad skills studios are specifically designed for the students in this program. Students complete a series of projects that will enable them to develop the skills and the critical thinking needed in the graduate curriculum. Students have the option to take studios offered in the school’s Berlin program or remain in Boston and follow the Urban Institutions studio sequence.

YEAR TWO

In the Urban Housing Studio, students learn to develop new patterns of housing for specific Boston sites and to develop those sites with their own individual interventions. The Comprehensive Design Studio challenges the students to consider architectural connections at all scales, from the nut and bolt to the scale of the door or window to the scale of the whole building and the city. Additionally, students take classes in technology as well as architecture seminars.

YEAR THREE

In the final year, students engage in a research project based on topics chosen by the graduate faculty. Team research is conducted and complied into a published book. This books and the related work serves as the foundation of individual projects. The final degree project offers an opportunity to leverage research conducted in the first semester with real innovation in new hybrid types, strategic alterations of existing ones, and to take on the challenge of finding prototypical solutions for systemic problems.

Advanced Placement

Students with some background in architecture may be eligible for advanced placement into the program. Advanced placement will be determined by an applicant’s transcript and portfolio. Only select courses in the first year of the program will be waived. All waivers are at the discretion of the school and applicants maybe required to provide documentation if they seek additional waivers.

The minimum course work for all students in the first year of the program is

  • 2 Studio Courses (Minimum 10 credits total)
  • 2 Graduate Electives (Minimum 8 credits total)

*NOTE: This program begins in Summer 2, not September.

COURSE SEQUENCE (78-112 Credits)

YEAR ONE, SUMMER TWO

YEAR ONE, FALL

YEAR ONE, SPRING (BOSTON OPTION)

YEAR ONE, SPRING (BERLIN-OPTION)

YEAR TWO, FALL

YEAR TWO, SPRING

YEAR THREE, FALL

YEAR THREE, SPRING

Electives

This is a list of approved graduate electives. Classes may not run every semester. If you wish to take a class that is not on this list, please email the course name, course number and description to Mary Hughes. The course will be reviewed and if approved, will be added as an option to the list.

ARTH 5100 – Contemporary Art Theory and Criticism (4 credits)
Spring 2016 

Introduces the major critical and philosophical approaches that have transformed the reception, interpretation, and production of contemporary art since the 1960s. Examines a range of key interpretive methodologies—including modernism, postmodernism, psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, poststructuralism and deconstruction, critical race theory, visual studies, and globalism—designed to provide practitioners with the means to critically frame their own art making within contemporary debates about the meaning and social functions of art.

ARTG 5330: Visualization Technologies (4 credits)
Fall 2015 CRN 16005

Introduces programming languages that allow computational analysis and digital delivery of dynamic information. Examines implications of environmental and personal sensor data sources, mobile collection and analysis of data, real-time networked data sets, and social use of shared data visualization tools.

ARTH 5400Contemporary Visual Culture (4 credits)
Spring 2016 

Explores the implications of the erosion of the traditional boundary between fine art and mass culture for artistic theory and practice as well as art’s place in an increasingly globalized world. Situates contemporary artistic practice within the broader context of visual culture – including film, television, advertising, architecture, and the Internet.

ECON 7260: Urban Economic Systems (4 credits)
Spring 2016 

Examines urban economic systems including systematic relationships among cities, as well as those within cities. The portion of the course devoted to inter-metropolitan analysis covers central place theory, the location of economic activity, and inter-metropolitan trade. Intrametropolitan analysis includes urban form and land use, land use controls, and local government systems.

ECON 7261: Urban Economic Development (4 credits)
Fall 2015 CRN 15565

Examines urban economic development processes. Topics include models and techniques for describing and evaluating urban economies; development strategies and tools; commercial, industrial, and housing development; and problems of poverty and housing.

ECON 7270: Economics of Law and Regulation (4 credits)
Spring 2016

Relies on models of welfare economics to analyze the impact of laws, regulation, and deregulation, in terms of both positive and normative aspects. Topics include economic analysis of market failures and government remedies; property, tort, and contract law; and economic and social regulation. Students are encouraged to develop critical skills in analyzing various types of economic policy. Prereq. Knowledge of microeconomics.

ECON 7771: Framework of Industrial Organization (4 credits)
Spring 2016

Sets out the analytical framework of industrial organization economics-the basis and method for evaluating the performance of markets and firms and for prescribing policies for improvement. Topics include size and structure of firms, market concentration, pricing in oligopoly and other markets, entry and entry deterrence strategies, and advertising and product strategies. Each of these topics is examined using a range of tools including microeconomic theory, game theory, and statistical analysis. Prereq. ECON 7710 and ECON 7740, both with a grade of B–.

ENVR 5260: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (4 credits)
Spring 2016

Examines geographical information systems (GIS), a way to input, store, analyze, and display spatial data (data with a geographic location). Introduces the major components and applications of this exciting new tool. Consists of two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory exercises introduce methods of data analysis as well as practical issues of how to manipulate various GIS software packages.

ENVR 5262: GIS Workshop (2 credits)
Spring 2016

Studies the basic techniques of reflection and refraction seismology, gravity, aeromagnetic and heat-flow processes, and the information they provide on the structure, composition, and dynamics of the earth’s interior.

HIST 7217: Modern American Social History (4 credits)
Spring 2016

Examines recent historical literature on changes in American society over the last hundred years. Possible topics include race, ethnicity, class, gender, migration, demography, deviance, and social policy.

HIST 7311: Grad Seminar in Urban History (4 credits)
Spring 2016

Examines the history of the modern city, with a focus on America and on Boston, and discusses local history sources and their analysis.

JRNL 5311: Design and Graphics (4 credits)
Spring 2016

Introduces graphic design terminology and principles using Adobe PageMaker, a leading desktop publishing program. Covers how to plan a publication based on audience and budget. Design assignments include newspapers, magazines, brochures, advertisements, and corporate identity programs. Strict attention is paid to deadlines and quality of the printed publication. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

LPSC 6313: Economic Analysis for Law, Policy, and Planning
(3 credits*)
Fall 2015 CRN 11906

Designed to familiarize master’s degree students with the essential ideas and methods of microeconomics and their application to a wide range of domestic public policy issues at the national, state, and local level. The role of program and management incentives in influencing behavior and policy outcomes is heavily emphasized. The course focus is to understand the ideas of microeconomic theory and apply them to a range of alternative public policy issues. Offers students an opportunity to develop a clear understanding of essential economic ideas and how the economic perspective can be applied to a wide range of public policy issues.
*Please enroll in the planning module LPSC 8400 associated with this course when you register. 

LPSC 7312: Cities, Sustainability, and Climate Change
(3 credits*)

Fall (not running in fall 2015 due to faculty sabbatical)

Provides an overview of the various aspects of urban sustainability planning. Examines sustainability as an urban planning approach with both ecological and social justice goals. Covers sustainable planning and offers students an opportunity to understand it within the context of smart growth and the new urbanism. Focuses on the two areas in which cities can reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions—the built environment and transportation. From there, the course examines planning efforts to reduce demand on water and sewer systems and to create employment in renewable energy and other “clean-tech” occupations. The course ends by placing urban initiatives in the context of state and national policy. *Please enroll in the planning module LPSC 8400 associated with this course when you register.

LPSC 8400: Planning Module in Urban Law and Policy
(1 credit)

This is the add-on module for LSPC 6313 and LPSC 7312. Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

ME 5645 Environmental Issues in Manufacturing and Product Use
Fall 2015 CRN 12555

Explores environmental and economic aspects of different materials used in products throughout the product life cycle. Introduces concepts of industrial ecology, life cycle analysis, and sustainable development. Students work in teams to analyze case studies of specific products fabricated using metals, ceramics, polymers, or paper. These case studies compare cost, energy, and resources used and emissions generated through the mining, refining, manufacture, use, and disposal stages of the product life cycle. Debates issues in legislation (extended product responsibility, recycling mandates, and ecolabeling) and in disposal strategies (landfill, incineration, reuse, and recycling). Discusses difficulties associated with environmental impact assessments and the development of decision analysis tools to weigh the tradeoffs in technical, economic, and environmental performance, and analyzes specific case studies. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

POLS 7314: Urban Government and Politics (3 credits*)
Spring 2016

Explores issues and problems in urban government, such as legal dependence, government finance and administration, rapid growth of suburban and metropolitan areas, and decline and decay of the central city. *Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 7315: Urban Development and Politics (3 credits*)
Spring 2106

Analyzes the creation and implementation of urban development policies and programs. Explores subsidies and taxes, housing, commercial and industrial development, and job creation and training projects in terms of their historical, political, economic, and social dimensions. *Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 7324: Problems in Metropolitan Policymaking (3 credits*)
Spring 2016

Examines the broad challenges that confront metropolitan areas-defined as including the center city, its immediate suburbs, and the broader periphery-including economic development, land use, transportation, housing, and the provision of basic services. Considers the array of tools available to policymakers, including planning, tax policy, pooling of services, and zoning. Includes a professional activity related to urban planning. *Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 7326 International Development Administration and Planning (3 credits)

Takes a “manager’s eye view” of the formulation, implementation, evaluation, and improvement of development projects in less developed countries. Also focuses on the planning dynamics of host-government, bilateral, and multilateral organizations as they analyze and tackle such problem areas as agriculture, education, health, population, and land reform. Employs simulations and case studies. *Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 6400: Planning Module in Urban and Regional Policy (1 credit)

This is the add-on module for POLS 7314, POLS 7315,POLS 7324 and POLS 7326. Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

PPUA 5262 Big Data for Cities-Visual Data Mining Strategies (3 credits*)
Fall 2015 CRN 16299 

Focuses on investigating the city and its spatial, social, and economic dynamics through the lens of data and visual analytics. Utilizes large public datasets to develop knowledge about visual methods for analyzing data and communicating results. Develops a critical understanding of data-structures, collection methodologies, and their inherent biases. *Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 / CRN 14747 associated with this course when you register.

PPUA 7234: Land Use and Urban Growth Policy  (3 credits)*
Fall 2015 CRN 16940

Explores the evolution of land use and urban form in the United States and surveys different types of land-use and urban-growth management tools used by local, regional, and state governments. Examines the environmental, economic, spatial, and social impacts of different patterns of urban growth, including “sprawl” and “smart growth,” and the different philosophies and legal and policy approaches employed to manage those impacts. Also explores how land-use and urban-growth policy interacts with related priorities, including housing, infrastructure, and fiscal policy. Focuses on current and emerging issues and debates in land-use and urban-growth management, such as New Urbanism, livable communities, and transit-oriented development. *Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 / CRN 16941 associated with this course when you register.

PPUA 6201: The 21st Century City (3 credits)*
Fall 2015 CRN 11087

Offers multi-disciplinary examination of the wonders and challenges of urban life, with focus on current dynamics of urban location and prosperity in the context of a global economy. Examines forces that shaped the evolution of cities and metropolitan regions, assesses a range of policy issues confronting metro areas today and the respective roles played by public and private sectors in addressing those challenges, explores global forces that are transforming cities and regions throughout the world, and addresses key questions of urban well-being, civility, and civic engagement. *Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 / CRN 15962 associated with this course when you register.

PPUA 7231: Transportation Policy (3 credits)*

Examines the physical, technological, economic, social, cultural, and political underpinnings of transportation policy in the United States. Topics include intra- and interstate transportation, the comparative economics of different modes of transportation, the impacts of federal and state policies on transportation options, and the long-term effects of those choices on metropolitan development, housing, land use, energy and environment. Also involves comparisons with transportation systems in other countries. *Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 associated with this course when you register.

PPUA 7673: Capstone Project in Urban and Regional Policy (3 credits)*
Fall 2015 CRN 12847

Offers an opportunity for student teams, in partnership with a local, state, or federal agency or nonprofit institution, to assess an urban or regional problem, produce a thorough policy analysis, and present it and recommended solutions to the agency or institution. Course readings focus on materials needed to assess the problem and provide solutions. This is a faculty-guided team project for students completing course work in urban and regional policy studies. *Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400/CRN 15960 associated with this course when you register.

*PPUA 6400: Planning Module in Urban Policy (1 credit)

This is the add-on module for PPUA 6201, PPUA 7231, PPUA 767 and PPUA 5262 Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

SOCL 7256: Contemporary Issues: Globalization and the City (3 credits*)
Spring 2016

Discuss contemporary issues in sociology. Include supervised readings and written reports on special problems. *Please enroll in the planning module SOCL 8400 associated with this course when you register.

SOCL 7235: Urban Poverty and Social Policy (3 credits*)
Spring 2016

Explores the causes and consequences of poverty and how it is experienced in America’s inner cities. Each week students are required to read a selected text that focuses on a sociological theory or concept related to urban poverty. Topics include employment, family structure, crime and social control, education, culture, and neighborhoods. One of the key objectives is to examine the advantages and disadvantages of various policies designed to address the persistence of poverty and/or its attendant problems and consider the effectiveness of these strategies for poverty reduction at the individual or community level. *Please enroll in the planning module SOCL 8400 associated with this course when you register.

SOCL 7235: Urban Sociology (3 credits*)

Discusses theories of the development of urban life. Compares preindustrial and industrialized urban areas. Presents methods for the study of urban social structure and change, and evaluates contemporary metropolitan action programs. *Please enroll in the planning module SOCL 8400 associated with this course when you register.

SOCL 8400: Planning Module in Urban and Regional Policy (1 credit)

This is the add-on module for SOCL 7256 and SOCL 7235. Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

SUEN 6210 Implementation and Visualization for Urban Environments I (4 credits)
Fall 2015 CRN 14833

This course is an intensive introduction to site analysis and manipulation of earthworks, water and vegetation with a focus on disturbance regimes within waterfront and brownfield zones. Core topics emphasize the ecological services promoted by the urban environment, including: urban soil structure; contouring the urban surface; regional plant communities; storm water, surge and tidal flux management. Development of implementation skills is supported by training in vector, raster and 3D modeling software.

SUEN 6220 Implementation and Visualization for Urban Environments 2 (4 credits)
Spring 2016

Constitutes the second half of a two-part sequence and builds upon material in SUEN 6210. Core topics include an introduction to regional landscape ecology in urbanized watersheds. Focuses on landscape-scale systems and soft infrastructure. Introduces GIS and geo-design software as a lens to learn about and visualize change in regional environments. Offers students an opportunity to advance landscape analysis and visualization skills through further training in vector, raster, and 3D modeling software. Prereq. SUEN 6210.

SUEN 6310 Cities, Nature & Design in Contemporary History and Theory (4 credits)
Fall 2015 CRN 14834

This lecture courses presents an historical overview of evolving cultural, environmental and technological influences on societal attitudes toward the relationship of cities, nature and design.  Core topics include the emergence of critical theories, aesthetic philosophies and design typologies in the modern era of industrialization, and the subsequent impact of information, participation and globalization trends on 21st century designed urban environments.

SUEN 7320: Pro-Seminar: Issues in Designed Urban Environments (4 credits)
Fall 2105 CRN 15417

Offers an advanced graduate seminar examining the forces shaping designed urban environments in contemporary global culture. A diverse range of material from published design criticism to open source social media engagement provides basis for discussion and written and oral presentations. Course themes determined by the instructor parallel the studio sequence SUEN 7130 and SUEN 7140, although discussion topics are broadly presented to engage graduate students from any background.

SBSY 5200:Sustainable Engineering Systems for Buildings (4 credits)
Spring 2015 CRN 37004

Focuses on basic design and construction of mechanical/electrical/plumbing (MEP) systems in buildings. Covers MEP documentation, plumbing water supply, HVAC systems, electrical power supply and distribution, lighting systems, low-voltage electrical systems, and estimating and planning for these specialty areas. Also addresses sustainable design and construction practices for MEP, including minimization of energy consumption and carbon footprint.

TRANSFER CREDIT

Students entering the two-year and three-year Masters program may apply for transfer credit. The maximum transfer credits allowed by the university on the graduate level is 8. If you request transfer credit, you must supply the following:

  • Course name/number, description, and syllabus
  • Name of course you wish to receive credit for
  • Official transcript

Note that the following criteria must be met:

  • Courses taken must be graduate level courses
  • Course must be 4 credits
  • Student must have received a grade of B or better

Course Waivers

Students in the three-year Masters may request course waivers for courses that are similar to previously courses they have taken. For example, if students were art/architecture history majors as an undergraduate, it is possible that they may have taken a course that is part of the three-year curriculum.

To request a waiver:

  • Course name/number, description, and syllabus
  • Transcript with grade indicated
  • Name of course you wish to receive credit for

NOTE: Waivers are granted on a case-by-case basis. It is the responsibility of the student to provide the requested materials for faculty review. No waivers are given for classes after the first year.