Watch this video on what distinguishes our M.Arch Program

The program leverages the School’s outstanding faculty and pragmatically grounded curriculum. The physical and cultural context of Boston serves as a laboratory for the program’s design studios and is design-focused, but with a different approach than many schools. We find opportunities for innovation within the real estate and construction industries and current policy debates – rather than outside of them. This is how we intend to move architects to the center of the discussion about the future of our cities.

Students take courses in urban housing, practice integrated design and do original research on market-driven building types. The final degree project in the design studio offers an opportunity to leverage this research with real innovations in hybrid types, strategic alterations to existing ones, and to take on the challenge of finding prototypical solutions for systemic problems.

In addition to studio courses, graduate students take seminars in architectural theory and design strategy; and electives are available in real estate development, sustainable building techniques, urban landscape, and other topics. There is also a unique course that looks at case studies of architecture firms in practice, problem solving, and innovation. Students will leave our program with a unique balance of technical, theoretical, and strategic tools to make a real difference in the profession.

There are multiple ways that this degree can be completed:

One-Year Program

Open to candidates with  either  a BS in Architecture from Northeastern University or a professional Bachelor of Architecture degree from an accredited North American program with at least one year of IDP-approved professional experience.

Application Deadline for Fall entry: February 1 for non-Northeastern University candidates, April 1 for Northeastern University candidates

This program gives eligible candidates the opportunity to get a NAAB-accredited Master of Architecture degree in one year.

Two-Year Program

Open to candidates with an undergraduate degree in architecture that includes at least three design studio courses, two architectural history courses, and courses in structures and construction systems.

Application Deadline for Fall* Entry: February 1

*Please note that some admitted students may be required to take summer courses in design, architectural history, and/or technology, depending on their undergraduate work as evidenced by their transcripts.

Three-Year Program

Open to candidates with a non-architecture undergraduate degree

Application Deadline: February 1 for July entry

The program requires three years and a summer term to complete. Students have the option to spend a semester at the School’s Berlin program during their first spring semester program and have the option to enroll in the summer intern program managed by the University’s Co-op program. After completing a first year introductory curriculum, students in the Three-year program merge into the Two-year M.Arch curriculum.

Open to candidates with  either  a BS in Architecture from Northeastern University or a professional Bachelor of Architecture degree from an accredited North American program with at least one year of IDP-approved professional experience.

Application Deadline for Fall entry: February 1

This program gives eligible candidates the opportunity to get a NAAB-accredited Master of Architecture degree in one year.

The final degree project in the design studio offers an opportunity to leverage research conducted in the first semester with real innovation in new hybrid types, strategic alterations of existing ones, and to take on the challenge of finding prototypical solutions for systematic problems.

Masters Research Topic for 2013

Innovation in Urban Healthcare
Matthew Littell

Northeastern University is pleased to announce the formation of a new graduate research studio focusing on Innovation in Urban Healthcare. With the coming Affordable Care Act, there are a number of opportunities for architects to add value to the changing landscape of healthcare and urban environments.

To begin with, there is a large contingent of the previously uninsured that lives in cities but has not traditionally had access to primary and preventative care. Many large urban neighborhoods lack the physical infrastructure to supply these services outside of hospital settings.

This studio proposes to research the intersection of urban building typology, new modes of healthcare delivery (such as the CVS “minute Clinic” among others), and new opportunities for integrating healthcare services with other urban uses to create a new kind of urban environment. Students will research the needs of interior diagnostic spaces, existing urban pharmacies, historical mixed-use approaches to healthcare delivery, mixed-use urban building types, and the role of new transportation networks in cities as an opportunity for new integration of services. Additionally, new and emerging medical technologies will be researched to better understand both the spatial needs and the broader organizational issues that might impact these alternative health care delivery networks.

At the end of the fall semester, students will produce a comprehensive research document that will be made available to the public to enhance this conversation just as it is beginning in our cities. The studio will focus on Boston, but will address the larger healthcare delivery challenges that face all dense urban centers, both in the United States, and beyond.

The Spring 2014 semester will see graduate students building on this research as they move from research, description, representation and analysis, to design, speculation, experimentation, and prototype.

An Analytical Framework for Tall Office Towers
Gary Haney  + Aybars Asci

The concept of efficiency is critical to the design process of tall buildings, because of their; a) large scale b) repetitive components and c) extreme verticality. Large scale projects have large quantities which have significant environmental and material implications. Similar to designing an industrial product, high level of repetition in tall buildings demands a careful design process for the individual component. In a way, tall buildings can be seen as a propagation of a well designed integer. Extreme verticality requires a high level of engineering input. Tall buildings perform like a sophisticated machine.

Efficiency for tall buildings will be studied in three major areas: spatial efficiency, structural efficiency, and environmental efficiency. Spatial efficiency will cover topics like floor plate size, core configuration, planning module, lease span, vertical stack. Structural efficiency will cover forces, structural systems, placement of material, form finding algorithms and structural optimization. Environmental efficiency will cover building systems, enclosure design, energy consumption and life cycle analysis.

Resilient Coastal Leisure Environments
Ivan Rupnik

Despite the economic crisis and subsequent recession, the demand for international tourism has continued to grow. While tourism has increased globally, more than half of all tourists still travel to Europe, with one in five of all world tourists staying in Southern / Mediterranean Europe.

S/ME has the largest share of tourism of arrivals and receipts in the world, is also includes some of the Eurozone countries hardest hit by the economic recession. Although international tourism receipts dropped 7% between 2008 and 2009 in S/ME and 1% between 2009 an 2010, they grew nearly 6% between 2010 and 2011. This year, Greece, one of the hardest hit economies in the Eurozone, grew 10% in international tourist arrivals, while Portugal and Croatia experienced 9% growth, and significant increases in tourism receipts.

This studio will develop new architectural and urban strategies and prototypes that leverage tourism development to create more resilient coastal environments, using the Algarve and Dalmatia as comparative case studies. Particular focus will be paid to the rehabilitation of existing tourism structures, transportation infrastructure as well as the working landscape. In Portugal, we will work with a series of marina developments and Croatia we will focus on that countries expansive network of public nautical transportation hubs. Students will work closely with experts in Portugal, Croatia and Boston, and their work will also be informed by the initial findings of 2012/13 graduate research studio and symposium. An optional field trip to relevant sites in Portugal and Croatia during the fall semester will further augment the studio work. This studio is part of a larger European Union sponsored research project, Estudo Comparativo para a Reabilitação Urbana PT_HR Algarve-Dalmácia [Comparative Study of Urban Rehabilitation Strategies in the Algarve, Portugal and Dalmatia, Croatia], which will be completed in 2014 with a major publication and traveling exhibition.

New Life for Urban Manufacturing Districts
Tim Love

Every large American city has a dedicated manufacturing and industrial district that was created from scratch in the late 1950s and 1960s to remove industry from the central business districts and to relocate manufacturing companies to the new interstate highway system. Many of the districts, such as Newmarket in Boston, Mill River in New Haven, CT, and Morris Point in the Bronx, still have vital companies, but not at the density that they had at their inception and through the 1970s. The question today is what to do with these districts from an economic development and urban design standpoint. Until recently, “post-industrial” sites were often seen as targets for mixed use residential/commercial/retail development – modeled on the mix of (non-industrial) uses that made up the traditional city. More recently, public policy has highlighted the need to preserve and attract manufacturing jobs to the city, casting these once-forgotten districts in a new light.

This studio will begin by understanding why certain businesses still thrive in 1960s era industrial districts to understand models for densification. We will also look at rapidly gentrifying districts like Red Hook in Brooklyn, NULU in Louisville, and the LA Garment District to learn about new kinds of businesses like micro-breweries, artisanal food producers, and precision fabrication shops that are flourishing in industrial districts located near potential customers. Our goal will be to leverage these lessons to develop a tool-kit for urban design and architectural interventions that can maximize the density of these districts while attracting and maintaining as many manufacturing jobs as possible. The hope is to achieve levels of density that inspire pedestrian activity, resulting in the chance encounters that can create synergies between businesses based on shared technological know-how, transportation needs, and talent.

 

Course Sequence

Fall

Spring

Application Deadline: February 1 for Fall entry

This program offers students who have earned a BS in Architecture from an institution other than Northeastern to engage in the urban-focused curriculum that is offered at the School of Architecture.

Year One

In the Urban Housing Studio, students learn to develop new patterns of housing for specific Boston sites and to develop those sites with their own individual interventions. The Comprehensive Design Studio challenges the students to consider architectural connections at all scales, from the nut and bolt to the scale of the door or window to the scale of the whole building and the city. Additionally, students take classes in technology as well as architecture seminars.

Year Two

In the second year, students engage in a research project based on topics chosen by the graduate faculty. Team research is conducted and complied into a published book. This book and the related work serve as the foundation of individual projects. The final degree project offers an opportunity to leverage research conducted in the first semester with real innovation in new hybrid types, strategic alterations of existing ones, and to take on the challenge of finding prototypical solutions for systemic problems.

Course Sequence

Fall, Year One

Spring, Year One

Fall, Year Two

Spring, Year Two

Application Deadline: February 1 for July entry

The professional 3-¼ year M.Arch program prepares students who come from a variety of disciplines with degrees in other fields for a career in architecture.

The program requires three years and a summer to complete. Students may spend a semester at the School’s Berlin program (optional) and have the option to enroll in summer coops. After completing an accelerated introductory curriculum, graduate students in the 3-¼ year M.Arch program will merge into the existing curriculum for the M.Arch program.

Year One

In the first year, students take intensive studios, technology classes, and architectural history classes to immerse them in the studio culture of the school and to give them a strong foundation to begin the upper level studios. The Grad skills studios are specifically designed for the students in this program. Students complete a series of projects that will enable them to develop the skills and the critical thinking needed in the graduate curriculum. Students have the option to take studios offered in the school’s Berlin program or remain in Boston and follow the Urban Institutions studio sequence.

Year Two

In the Urban Housing Studio, students learn to develop new patterns of housing for specific Boston sites and to develop those sites with their own individual interventions. The Comprehensive Design Studio challenges the students to consider architectural connections at all scales, from the nut and bolt to the scale of the door or window to the scale of the whole building and the city. Additionally, students take classes in technology as well as architecture seminars.

Year Three

In the final year, students engage in a research project based on topics chosen by the graduate faculty. Team research is conducted and complied into a published book. This books and the related work serves as the foundation of individual projects. The final degree project offers an opportunity to leverage research conducted in the first semester with real innovation in new hybrid types, strategic alterations of existing ones, and to take on the challenge of finding prototypical solutions for systemic problems.

*NOTE: This program begins in Summer 2, not September.

Course Sequence

Year One, Summer Two

Year One, Fall

Year One, Spring (Boston option)

Year One, Spring (Berlin-Option)

Year Two, Fall

Year Two, Spring

Year Three, Fall

Year Three, Spring

 

 

This is a list of approved graduate electives. Classes may not run every semester. If you wish to take a class that is not on this list, please email the course name, course number and description to Mary Hughes. The course will be reviewed and if approved, will be added as an option to the list.

ARTH 5100 - Contemporary Art Theory and Criticism (4 credits)

Spring 2015   CRN 35093   W/1:35 – 5:05 pm

Introduces the major critical and philosophical approaches that have transformed the reception, interpretation, and production of contemporary art since the 1960s. Examines a range of key interpretive methodologies—including modernism, postmodernism, psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, poststructuralism and deconstruction, critical race theory, visual studies, and globalism—designed to provide practitioners with the means to critically frame their own art making within contemporary debates about the meaning and social functions of art.

ARTG 5330: Visualization Technologies (4 credits)

Fall 2014   CRN 17120   TH/1:35 – 5:05 pm

Introduces programming languages that allow computational analysis and digital delivery of dynamic information. Examines implications of environmental and personal sensor data sources, mobile collection and analysis of data, real-time networked data sets, and social use of shared data visualization tools.

ARTH 5400: Contemporary Visual Culture (4 credits)

Explores the implications of the erosion of the traditional boundary between fine art and mass culture for artistic theory and practice as well as art’s place in an increasingly globalized world. Situates contemporary artistic practice within the broader context of visual culture – including film, television, advertising, architecture, and the Internet.

ECON 7260: Urban Economic Systems (4 credits)

Examines urban economic systems including systematic relationships among cities, as well as those within cities. The portion of the course devoted to intermetropolitan analysis covers central place theory, the location of economic activity, and intermetropolitan trade. Intrametropolitan analysis includes urban form and land use, land use controls, and local government systems. 

ECON 7261: Urban Economic Development (4 credits)

Fall 2014   CRN 16652   W/4:35 – 7:35 pm

Examines urban economic development processes. Topics include models and techniques for describing and evaluating urban economies; development strategies and tools; commercial, industrial, and housing development; and problems of poverty and housing.

ENVR 5260: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (4 credits)

Examines geographical information systems (GIS), a way to input, store, analyze, and display spatial data (data with a geographic location). Introduces the major components and applications of this exciting new tool. Consists of two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory exercises introduce methods of data analysis as well as practical issues of how to manipulate various GIS software packages.

ENVR 5262: GIS Workshop (2 credits)

Studies the basic techniques of reflection and refraction seismology, gravity, aeromagnetic and heat-flow processes, and the information they provide on the structure, composition, and dynamics of the earth’s interior.

HIST 7217: Modern American Social History (4 credits)

Examines recent historical literature on changes in American society over the last hundred years. Possible topics include race, ethnicity, class, gender, migration, demography, deviance, and social policy.

HIST 7311: Grad Seminar in Urban History (4 credits)

Examines the history of the modern city, with a focus on America and on Boston, and discusses local history sources and their analysis.

JRNL 5311: Design and Graphics (4 credits)

Spring 2015   CRN 32200  T/1:35 – 4:35 pm

Fall 2014   CRN 11683   T/1:35 – 4:35 pm

Introduces graphic design terminology and principles using Adobe PageMaker, a leading desktop publishing program. Covers how to plan a publication based on audience and budget. Design assignments include newspapers, magazines, brochures, advertisements, and corporate identity programs. Strict attention is paid to deadlines and quality of the printed publication. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

LPSC 6313: Economic Analysis for Law, Policy, and Planning (3 credits)

Fall 2014   CRN 12077   M/5:15 – 7:45 pm

Designed to familiarize master’s degree students with the essential ideas and methods of microeconomics and their application to a wide range of domestic public policy issues at the national, state, and local level. The role of program and management incentives in influencing behavior and policy outcomes is heavily emphasized. The course focus is to understand the ideas of microeconomic theory and apply them to a range of alternative public policy issues. Offers students an opportunity to develop a clear understanding of essential economic ideas and how the economic perspective can be applied to a wide range of public policy issues. Please enroll in the planning module LPSC 8400 associated with this course when you register. 

LPSC 7312: Cities, Sustainability, and Climate Change (3 credits)

Fall 2014   CRN 12076   T/5:30 – 8:00 pm

Provides an overview of the various aspects of urban sustainability planning. Examines sustainability as an urban planning approach with both ecological and social justice goals. Covers sustainable planning and offers students an opportunity to understand it within the context of smart growth and the new urbanism. Focuses on the two areas in which cities can reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions—the built environment and transportation. From there, the course examines planning efforts to reduce demand on water and sewer systems and to create employment in renewable energy and other “clean-tech” occupations. The course ends by placing urban initiatives in the context of state and national policy. Please enroll in the planning module LPSC 8400 associated with this course when you register.

LPSC 8400: Planning Module in Urban Law and Policy (1 credit)

Fall 2014   CRN 12568   TBA

This is the add-on module for LSPC 6313 and LPSC 7312. Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

POLS 7314: Urban Government and Politics (3 credits)

Spring 2015   CRN 35736   TBA

Explores issues and problems in urban government, such as legal dependence, government finance and administration, rapid growth of suburban and metropolitan areas, and decline and decay of the central city. Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 7315: Urban Development and Politics (3 credits)

Spring 2015   CRN 33790   W/5:15 – 7:45 pm

Analyzes the creation and implementation of urban development policies and programs. Explores subsidies and taxes, housing, commercial and industrial development, and job creation and training projects in terms of their historical, political, economic, and social dimensions. Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 7324: Problems in Metropolitan Policymaking (3 credits)

Examines the broad challenges that confront metropolitan areas-defined as including the center city, its immediate suburbs, and the broader periphery-including economic development, land use, transportation, housing, and the provision of basic services. Considers the array of tools available to policymakers, including planning, tax policy, pooling of services, and zoning. Includes a professional activity related to urban planning. Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 7326 International Development Administration and Planning (3 credits)

Takes a “manager’s eye view” of the formulation, implementation, evaluation, and improvement of development projects in less developed countries. Also focuses on the planning dynamics of host-government, bilateral, and multilateral organizations as they analyze and tackle such problem areas as agriculture, education, health, population, and land reform. Employs simulations and case studies. Please enroll in the planning module POLS 6400 associated with this course when you register.

POLS 6400: Planning Module in Urban and Regional Policy (1 credit)

Spring 2015   CRN 36727   TBA

This is the add-on module for POLS 7314, POLS 7315,POLS 7324 and POLS 7326. Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

PPUA 5262 Big Data for Cities-Visual Data Mining Strategies (3 credits)*

Spring 2015   CRN 36891   M/5:15 – 7:45 pm

Focuses on investigating the city and its spatial, social, and economic dynamics through the lens of data and visual analytics. Utilizes large public datasets to develop knowledge about visual methods for analyzing data and communicating results. Develops a critical understanding of data-structures, collection methodologies, and their inherent biases.

PPUA 7234: Land Use and Urban Growth Policy  (3 credits)*

Explores the evolution of land use and urban form in the United States and surveys different types of land-use and urban-growth management tools used by local, regional, and state governments. Examines the environmental, economic, spatial, and social impacts of different patterns of urban growth, including “sprawl” and “smart growth,” and the different philosophies and legal and policy approaches employed to manage those impacts. Also explores how land-use and urban-growth policy interacts with related priorities, including housing, infrastructure, and fiscal policy. Focuses on current and emerging issues and debates in land-use and urban-growth management, such as New Urbanism, livable communities, and transit-oriented development. Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 associated with this course when you register.

PPUA 6201: The 21st Century City (3 credits)*

Fall 2014   CRN 11163   W/5:15 – 7:45 pm

Offers multi-disciplinary examination of the wonders and challenges of urban life, with focus on current dynamics of urban location and prosperity in the context of a global economy. Examines forces that shaped the evolution of cities and metropolitan regions, assesses a range of policy issues confronting metro areas today and the respective roles played by public and private sectors in addressing those challenges, explores global forces that are transforming cities and regions throughout the world, and addresses key questions of urban well-being, civility, and civic engagement. Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 associated with this course when you register.

PPUA 7231: Transportation Policy (3 credits)*

Fall 2014   CRN 16561   T/5:15 – 7:45 pm

Examines the physical, technological, economic, social, cultural, and political underpinnings of transportation policy in the United States. Topics include intra- and interstate transportation, the comparative economics of different modes of transportation, the impacts of federal and state policies on transportation options, and the long-term effects of those choices on metropolitan development, housing, land use, energy and environment. Also involves comparisons with transportation systems in other countries. Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 associated with this course when you register.

PPUA 7673: Capstone Project in Urban and Regional Policy (3 credits)*

Spring 2015   CRN 32595   T/8:00 – 10:00 pm

Fall 2014   CRN 13078   T/8:00 – 10:30 pm

Offers an opportunity for student teams, in partnership with a local, state, or federal agency or nonprofit institution, to assess an urban or regional problem, produce a thorough policy analysis, and present it and recommended solutions to the agency or institution. Course readings focus on materials needed to assess the problem and provide solutions. This is a faculty-guided team project for students completing course work in urban and regional policy studies. Please enroll in the planning module PPUA 6400 associated with this course when you register.

*PPUA 6400: Planning Module in Urban Policy (1 credit)

Spring 2015   CRN 34618 / 36951   TBA

Fall 2014   CRN 15509 / 15510 / 15511 / 17075 / 17076 / 17077   TBA

This is the add-on module for PPUA 6201, PPUA 7231, PPUA 767 and PPUA 5262 Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

SOCL 7256: Contemporary Issues: Globalization and the City (3 credits)

Discuss contemporary issues in sociology. Include supervised readings and written reports on special problems. Please enroll in the planning module SOCL 8400 associated with this course when you register.

SOCL 7235: Urban Poverty and Social Policy (3 credits)

Explores the causes and consequences of poverty and how it is experienced in America’s inner cities. Each week students are required to read a selected text that focuses on a sociological theory or concept related to urban poverty. Topics include employment, family structure, crime and social control, education, culture, and neighborhoods. One of the key objectives is to examine the advantages and disadvantages of various policies designed to address the persistence of poverty and/or its attendant problems and consider the effectiveness of these strategies for poverty reduction at the individual or community level. Please enroll in the planning module SOCL 8400 associated with this course when you register.

SOCL 7235: Urban Sociology (3 credits)

Discusses theories of the development of urban life. Compares preindustrial and industrialized urban areas. Presents methods for the study of urban social structure and change, and evaluates contemporary metropolitan action programs. Please enroll in the planning module SOCL 8400 associated with this course when you register.

SOCL 8400: Planning Module in Urban and Regional Policy (1 credit)

This is the add-on module for SOCL 7256 and SOCL 7235. Please make sure that you are enrolled for this additional semester hour.

SUEN 6210 Implementation and Visualization for Urban Environments I (4 credits)

Fall 2014   CRN 15637   T F/3:35 – 5:05 pm

This course is an intensive introduction to site analysis and manipulation of earthworks, water and vegetation with a focus on disturbance regimes within waterfront and brownfield zones. Core topics emphasize the ecological services promoted by the urban environment, including: urban soil structure; contouring the urban surface; regional plant communities; storm water, surge and tidal flux management. Development of implementation skills is supported by training in vector, raster and 3D modeling software.

SUEN 6310 Cities, Nature & Design in Contemporary History and Theory (4 credits)

Fall 2014   CRN 15638   T F/9:50 – 11:30 am

This lecture courses presents an historical overview of evolving cultural, environmental and technological influences on societal attitudes toward the relationship of cities, nature and design.  Core topics include the emergence of critical theories, aesthetic philosophies and design typologies in the modern era of industrialization, and the subsequent impact of information, participation and globalization trends on 21st century  designed urban environments.