Nanomaterials for Enhanced Detection of Explosives and Mitigation of Explosive Events
F1-B (Phase 1)

Download the 2013 Project Report

This research is focused on the synthesis of nanomaterials which can be incorporated into high explosives. Alternative applications, depending on the material’s composition, include incorporation in composites to either increase the resistance to blast or for enhanced detection post-blast. This year’s focus has been to understand the effect of morphology on the materials properties and performance. To this end we have expanded our work to form low density materials composed of pure nitrocellulose to further understand the effect of morphology on the materials structural integrity and stability. In addition to these fundamental studies we have also integrated other nanomaterials and high explosives with the structures to examine the composite materials properties. In addition in a effort to enhance our control of the pore structure of these materials we have investigated methods to use hard templates to form hierarchical porous materials which can be used as host energetic materials. These materials are novel in that they have a bimodal pore structure which is formed from a single stage reaction.

We wanted to make an optically activated material, so that if, for example, a bomb squad want to blow up a car they suspect has a terrorist device inside, they would have something they could remotely place under the car and then activate it with a laser, rather than someone having to go in there and wire it up.
- Louisa Hope-Weeks, Project Lead
Project Leader
  • Louisa Hope-Weeks
    Professor
    Texas Tech University
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Faculty and Staff Currently Involved in Project
  • Brandon Weeks
    Associate Director
    Texas Tech University
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  • Geneva Peterson
    Post Doctoral
    Texas Tech University
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Students Currently Involved in Project
  • Marauo Davis
    Texas Tech University