SPARC Webinar: September 2

Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS): One Stop Shopping For All Detection Needs

with Prof. Jimmie Oxley, Professor of Chemistry, University of Rhode Island and Dr. Miriam Fico, Principal Scientist of Physical Sciences, Smiths Detection

The slides and video presentation of the September 2nd webinar is now available online!

The sixth webinar of the SPARC (Seminars to Promote ALERT Research and Collaboration) Webinar series will continue on September 2nd from 11:30am – 12:00pm EDT. More information on the presentation can be found below:

Title: Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS): One Stop Shopping For All Detection Needs

Presenters: Prof. Jimmie Oxley, Professor of Chemistry, University of Rhode Island and Dr. Miriam Fico, Principal Scientist of Physical Sciences, Smiths Detection

Abstract:

Currently, the homeland security enterprise has deployed a large number of Explosive Trace Detectors (ETD). The technology, generally used, ion mobility spectrometry, requires the sample to be thermally desorbed to vaporize the material for subsequent analysis. Ion mobility spectrometry is a proven and widely fielded detection method for screening for the presence of volatile organic species. However, current ETD detectors find detection of some high-melting-point inorganic salts challenging. In order to more effectively and efficiently screen and detect these materials, an augmented ionization method is needed.   As a part of this program we will develop Ambient Desorption Ionization (ADI) and demonstrate this capability with Smiths’ IONSCAN 600 (IS600) ETD. Baseline studies have been conducted at the University of Rhode Island to demonstrate the feasibility of ADI for detection of low-volatility materials. Interfacing ADI with a fielded ETD system such as IS600 presents a functional solution, in a single instrument, which will be suitable for detection of organic and inorganic explosives, illicit drugs, and other contraband.

Speaker Bios: 

Dr. Oxley is the Characterization & Elimination of Illicit Explosives Lead for the ALERT Center. Dr. Oxley is also a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and co-Director of the Forensic Science Partnership of URI. She earned a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia (Chemistry) and joined the faculty of New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology (NMT) where she founded a Ph.D. program in explosives and created a Thermal Hazards Research group. Oxley’s lab specializes in the study of energetic materials—explosives, propellants, pyrotechnics. Dr. Oxley has organized numerous symposia and short courses for government and industrial laboratories on topics ranging from hazards analysis to bomb threats. Dr. Oxley has authored 80 papers on energetic materials (explosives, propellants, pyrotechnics).

Miriam Fico was educated at The College of William and Mary where she earned her BSc in Chemistry. She obtained her PhD in Analytical Chemistry from Purdue University under the direction of R. Graham Cooks where she focused on the development of miniaturized mass spectrometers. After receiving her degree she has continued to focus on product and method development for portable mass spectrometers for military defense and homeland security applications.

If you are interested in attending or have any questions, please reach out to Tiffany Lam at t.lam@northeastern.edu for more information.

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