2014-2015 M2AP Recipients

Multidisciplinary collaborations for the detection and treatment of resistant Gram-negative infections

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Lead: Elizabeth B. Hirsch, Assistant Professor Department of Pharmacy and Health Systems Sciences, Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Mentoring Team: 1 postdoctoral fellow, 1 senior faculty member, 1 assistant professor, 1 PhD candidate

Synopsis of mentoring grant:

The goal is to foster multidisciplinary research collaborations to help solve multiple challenges involved in the detection and treatment of CRE infections.  Dr. Hirsch aimed to take a multi-pronged approach which included learning from and working beside collaborators with unique skills and expertise in the area of pathogen detection and infection treatment.  From this diverse set of collaborators, she learned the skills necessary for antimicrobial drug development, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, bioengineering tools for pathogen detection, and the use of an invertebrate model system.

Accomplishments:

Dr. Hirsch stimulated new collaborations and those currently existing were strengthened.  While no grants have been funded, multiple proposals were submitted and multiple abstracts and manuscripts are in progress or under review.

Impact on research:

“Overall, this grant helped me to go outside my comfort zone in establishing collaborative projects with both internal and external collaborators.  By having a specific grant I was working to fulfill deliverables for, I was more motivated to show accomplishments such as posters and manuscripts.  I believe this grant helped me build my research network and move forward with even more collaborative laboratory and clinical research projects.  I believe my collaborative relationships have made me more visible in the field as I have received multiple peer review invitations and advisory board/speakers bureau invitations from the pharmaceutical industry which indicate my visibility / reputation in the field.”

Digital Humanities Group

 

 

 

 


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Co-Lead: Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor and Julia Flanders, Professor of the Practice, Department of English, College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Mentoring Team: 1 postdoctoral fellow, 1 senior faculty member, 1 assistant professor, 1 PhD candidate

Synopsis of mentoring grant:

There is a need to discuss the challenges of assessment and mentoring of digital humanities, colleagues within the Northeastern DH community, and also to bring in expertise and perspectives from outside the institution.  The plan was to use these discussions as the starting point for a larger departmental discussion about evaluating digital scholarship and to prepare a white paper that would gather and analyze existing materials, and highlight key components of digital scholarship, especially those which older methods of evaluation might overlook.

Accomplishments:

This project provided an opportunity for all members of the group to share insight and mentor one another. Indeed, one of the strengths of the group was the diversity of perspectives, including junior and senior faculty, a post-doctoral fellow, a professor of practice, and a PhD candidate. Each of these roles faces different kinds of challenges in pursuing a scholarly career in digital humanities, and their discussions highlighted these perspectives vividly.  The process of researching and preparing the white paper was extremely helpful in anchoring these discussions. The white paper asked the group to think about how their own careers and professional prospects would be affected by their institutional situation, and what kinds of changes might help eliminate artificial obstacles and enable them to contribute more effectively to the departments’ research profiles.

Impact on Research:

“I found our group discussions and [research fellow]’s research on other institutions quite useful as I prepared my third-year review and looked toward tenure. In particular, [research fellow] helped synthesize a range of practices, both positive and negative, that clarified the ways in which junior faculty in digital humanities have worked to make their research legible to senior colleagues at diverse institutions. Our group conversations helped clarify how to apply these insights at Northeastern specifically, outlining both the challenges and opportunities at an institution focused on interdisciplinary work. My colleagues’ mentorship actively shaped the way I wrote about my research and service in my mid-course review dossier, which was received quite positively by the department, and helped me clarify my priorities in the coming three years as I prepare for my tenure review. Our workshop was likewise valuable, allowing us to bring our local ideas back to a larger community and test how our ideas would resonate with the wider DH community. Though T&P has been central to my conversations with colleagues and administrators since arriving at Northeastern, I was grateful to work directly with other DH colleagues on this vital issue well in advance of submitting my dossier.”

Gender and Development Economics

 

Co-Leads: Catalina Herrera Almanza and Bilge Erten, junior faculty in Economics and International Affairs, College of Social Science and Humanities

Mentoring Team:  1 faculty program director and 1 department chair

Synopsis of mentoring grant:

The main goal of this mentoring grant was to meet with external faculty, research and policy experts in the Gender and Development Economics field in the Northeastern academic and policy hub, including the Boston area as well as New York and Washington D.C. These academic and policy experts helped us identify projects, lead us in the publication process as well as guide us to position our work in the relevant network of academic and international organizations, which will be an important building block for the proposed Institute for Gender and Development Research, an initiative of the International Affairs Program and the Department of Economics.

Accomplishments:

A workshop was held on February 5th 2015 at Northeastern with a group of academic experts from Harvard University, Brandeis University, and University of Virginia as well as policy institutions such as International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and policymakers and leaders in multilateral organizations such as UN-Women and World Bank.  The purpose of the workshop was to bring together academic scholar and practitioners for a discussion of emerging areas for collaborative research and policy dialogues.

Impact on research:

Catalina Herrera Almanza:

“I used the grant resources to attend and present my research in the 2015 Population Association of America which took place in San Diego, California, between April 27th and May 2nd. As part of the conference activities, I participated in the “Longitudinal Studies of Adolescent Health in Sub-Saharan Africa Workshop”, an initiative from different academic researchers and policy makers to develop a research network on young women’s health in Africa. This was a great opportunity to interact with researchers at UNICEF and International Center for Research on Women-ICWR- as well as academics from the Harvard Population Center and George Washington University. I also presented my research on childhood determinants of youth internal migration in Senegal. I think that the mentoring grant has been a great resource to fund activities that allow us to build a network of academics and policymakers with whom we can work on Gender and Development research topics.”

Bilge Erten:

“I presented my research on the effects of trade liberalization on gender inequality in South Africa at the Levy Institute on April 1, 2015. This was a great opportunity to share the findings of my research with interested scholars at the Levy Institute. With their gender and the economy research team, we are currently developing a grant proposal to be submitted to the IDRC. This will be a multi-year, multi-site grant involving the Levy Institute, Northeastern University, and the Center for Development Alternatives in India.  I believe the grant resulted in building me a network of scholars with whom I can further collaborate in the upcoming years.”

Migration, Violence, Trauma and the Health of Immigrant Children

Lead:  Tiffany Kim, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Bouve College of Health Sciences

Mentoring Team:  3 Northeastern senior faculty members and 1 external director of a Boston agency

Synopsis of mentoring grant:

The overall goal of this project was to support the development, writing and submission of a K01 grant proposal, focused on the health of unaccompanied minors from Central America living in the Boston area.

Accomplishments:

During the grant period, our team met frequently and with the group’s support and feedback, Dr. Kim drafted the NIH-K proposal. During this time, she also obtained IRB approval, collected and analyzed pilot data, which was incorporated into the proposal. Through this process, she identified additional mentors outside of Northeastern to assist with the development of the NIH-K proposal and provide additional resources. These new contacts included the Director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Center for Refugee Trauma and Resilience, as well as an Associate Professor of Child Health and Human Rights in the Department of Global Health and Population at Harvard School of Public Health.  Throughout the grant period, she continued to build new relationships within the local immigrant community, including members of the MA Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition, the Immigrant Service Providers Group/Health in Somerville and the Chelsea Collaborative, who all provided positive feedback and acted as invaluable connections to the population of interest in the greater Boston area.

Impact on research:

“The M2AP has had a positive impact on my research, as we were able to use the funds to formalize a mentorship team, conceptualize a new research project, write my first federal grant, and conduct a pilot study. I’m so grateful to have had the opportunity to work with such successful, brilliant and generous senior scientists, who gave so much of their time as part of this project. Although these mentor-mentee relationships might have been available to me earlier, the M2AP provided us with an opportunity to create additional structure around these relationships, set clear goals and gave a sense of legitimacy to the endeavor.”