logo
   Dagmar Sternad

   Professor
   Departments of Biology, Electrical & Computer Engineering,
   and Physics

Northeastern University
134 Mugar Life Science Building

360 Huntington Avenue

Boston, MA 02115

Phone : 617.373.5093

e-mail : dagmar@neu.edu

 

 

 

 

bullet

Home

bullet

Action Lab:

Research

People

Publications

Recent Posters

Open Positions

bullet

Teaching

bullet

Action Club

bullet

Curriculum Vitae

bullet

Useful Links

bulletDirections to Lab
bullet

Biology Department

bullet

Graduate Studies

bullet

Northeastern University


                          Curriculum Vitae: Dagmar Sternad

Title and Affiliation

Professor

 

Departments of Biology, Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Physics

 

134 Mugar Life Sciences Building

 

Northeastern University

 

360 Huntington Avenue

 

Boston MA 02115

 

Phone: 617-373-5093

 

Fax: 617-373-3724

 

email: dagmar@neu.edu

 

http://www.northeastern.edu/actionlab/index.htm

Education                  

PhD 1995

Experimental Psychology, University of Connecticut (summa cum laude)

1991-1992

Movement Science, Free University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

MS 1991

Experimental Psychology, University of Connecticut

BA 1986

Movement Science and English Linguistics / Literature, Technical University of Munich, Germany (with highest honors)

Professional Appointments

2011 –

Member of Editorial Board of Biomathematics

2011 – 2015

Regular Member of NIH Study Section on Motor Function, Speech and Rehabilitation (MFSR)

2009 –

Consulting Editor for Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

2009 –

Member of Steering Committee of the PhD Program in Bioengineering and Manager of Track “Motor Control”, College of Engineering, Northeastern University

2008 –

Member of the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Complex Systems (CIRCS), Northeastern University

2008 –

Professor of Biology, Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Physics, Northeastern University, Northeastern University

2007 – 2008

Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Biosciences, Pennsylvania State University

2006 – 2008

Temporary member of the NIH Study Section on Motor Function, Rehabilitation and Speech (MFRS)

2006 – 2008

Member of the National Science Foundation (NSF) panel, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences

2005 –

Executive Editor of Journal of Motor Behavior

2004 – 2008

Joint appointment in the Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Neuroscience, Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

2001 – 2007

Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Faculty at the Integrative Biosciences, Institute for Neuroscience, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

1995 – 2001

Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

1993

Teaching Assistant, University of Connecticut

1991 – 1995

Research Assistant, University of Connecticut

1992

Research Assistant, Free University of Amsterdam, Department of Human Movement Sciences

1989 – 1991

Research Assistant, Haskins Laboratories – Yale University, New Haven

1983 – 1986

Research Assistant, Department of Movement Science, Technical University of Munich, Germany

 

Scholarships and Awards

2008

Invitation to the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative on Complex Systems, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, Irvine, CA

 

2007

Invited Researcher at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Bielefeld (Zentralinstitut für Interdisziplinäre Forschung), Germany

 

1999, 2000

Fellow-at-Large of the Santa Fe Institute for Complex Systems

 

1999

Honorary Member of the National Golden Key Honors Society

 

1995

Postdoctoral Fellowship of the Institute for Research in Cognitive Science of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (declined)

 

1995

Postdoctoral Fellowship of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois (declined)

 

1995

Postdoctoral Fellowship of the Leverhulme Trust, Lancaster University, Great Britain (declined)

 

1994

Dissertation Research Award of the American Psychology Association

 

1993 –

Fellow of the German National Foundation of Science (Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes, (top 0.3% of the German university students)

 

1992 –

Fellow of the Santa Fe Institute (Study of Complex Systems)

 

1988 – 1993

Scholarship and Fellow of the German National Foundation of Science, (Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes, for the top 0.2% of the university students)

 

1989

Scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, DAAD)

 

1988

Doctoral Fellowship from the Bavarian Government for a doctoral dissertation

 

1981 1982

Scholarship from the University of Munich to study one year in Great Britain, (Kontaktstipendium der Ludwig Maximilians Universität München)

1978 1986

Fellowship awarded to the academic elite by the Bavarian Government, (Hochbegabtenförderung nach dem Bayerischen Begabtenförderungsgesetz)

 

Invitations as Visiting Researcher and Guest Professor, and Collaborations

2009

Computational principles of sensorimotor learning, Kloster Irsee, Germany, September 13-15.

2008

National Academies Keck Futures Initiative (NAKFI) Conference: Complex Systems

2003

Visiting Associate Professor at the GRASP laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Science, University of Pennsylvania

Fall 2002

Visiting Associate Professor at the Institute of Cognitive and Brain Sciences at the University of California at Berkeley

Summer 2002

Invitation as Guest Professor at the Center for Research in Sport Sciences, University of Paris Sud XI (competitive appointment)

2001

Invited Researcher at the University of Saarbrücken, Germany

1999 – 2001

Collaboration on fMRI study with University of Western Ontario, Department of Psychology, Canada

Summer 1998

Visiting Researcher at the Kawato Dynamic Brain Project of the ERATO (Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology), Program organized by Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST)

May 1998

Guest Professor at the Technical University of Munich (competitive appointment by the Technical University of Munich)

Summer 1997

Visiting Researcher at the Kawato Dynamic Brain Project of the ERATO (Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology), Program organized by Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST)

Spring 1997

Researcher at the Simulations Applications Lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory, TSA-DO/SA MS M997, New Mexico


I. Research

Grants


In Progress

2010 – 2015: NIH-R01-HD045639: Variability and stability in skill acquisition

        Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, National Institutes of Health, $1,618,500 (Priority percentile: 2%).

20092014: NSF DMS-0928587 PRISM: Attracting students to Mathematics, Physics and Biology through interdisciplinary research and discovery

        Principal Investigator: Richard Porter, Co-PI: Dagmar Sternad, Total: $1,987,411.

2011 – 2015: American Heart Association, 11SDG7270001, National Center Research Program. Training dual-task walking after stroke: effects on attentional and locomotor control

Principal Investigator: Prudence Plummer d’Amato, Co-Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Total: $308,000.
2011
2013: Tier I Seed Grant Vice Provost of Research, Northeastern University: Central fatigue in motor, sensory and cognitive performance
      Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, Therese Pirozzi O’Neill, Ying-Yee Kong, Deniz Erdogmus: Total: $50,000.

2010 – 2013: DFG-MU 1374/3-1: (Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft, Germany): Feedbackverarbeitung beim motorischen Lernen unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von motorischem Rauschen (The role of motor noise in feedback processing in motor learning)

        Principal Investigator: Hermann Müller, Consultant: Dagmar Sternad, Total: $210,000 to University of Giessen.

2011 – 2014: International Grant to University of Beijing: Multi-joint intelligent prosthesis based on EMG control

Principal Investigator: Long Wang and Kunlin Wei, Co-Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Total: $320,000 to University of Beijng.

20122015: US Army Research Institute: The effect of threat on task performance: testing the threat-induced potentiation of prepotent responses model

Principal Investigator: Steve Harkins. Total: $78,000.

2013: Provost Undergraduate Research Award, Northeastern University: Origins of asymmetric learning in an asymmetric bimanual task

Student: Julia Ebert. Mentor: Dagmar Sternad. Total: $1,000.

 20132014: Tier I Seed Grant Vice Provost of Research, Northeastern University: Development of an adaptive clinician-friendly virtual rehabilitation system and its evaluation in post-operative shoulder therapy

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, Co-Investigators: Miriam Leeser, Amee Seitz. Total: $50,000.

Completed

2012: Mathworks Sponsorship of Research Assistant Meghan Huber: Development of Matlab-based virtual rehabilitation           systems using Microsoft Kinect.
        Principal Investigator: Miriam Leeser. Support: $10,000.

2011 – 2013: NIH 1F32 AR061238: Postdoctoral Training Fellowship: Learning to control flexible objects using error-tolerant movement strategies

        Principal Investigator: Christopher J. Hasson, Sponsor: Dagmar Sternad. Total: $119,499.

2009 – 2010: DAAD 0809950: Effektorabhängige und unabhängige Anteile beim motorischen Transfer (Effector-dependent and independent contributions in motor transfer)

        Principal Investigators: Heiko Maurer and Lisa Pendt, Contact and Collaborator: Dagmar Sternad, approx. $20,000 to University of Giessen.

2005 – 2010: BCS-0904464: Dynamics of action and perception in a rhythmic task

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, National Science Foundation, Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Science, Perception, Action and Cognition, $355,000.

2003 – 2010: R01 HD045639: Variability and stability in skill acquisition

        Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, National Institutes of Health, $1,237,155.

2005 – 2009: ONR N00014-05-1-0844: Anomalous behavior detection related to IEDs

Principal Investigator: Lora Weiss, Applied Research Lab, Co-Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, $225,000.

2006 – 2007: Penn State 421-55 1001: Control of manual positioning sequences

Investigator: David Rosenbaum. Co-Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Social Science Research Institute, $20,000.

2004 – 2007: TSF 4100020604: Integrative functional imaging of cognitive systems in the developing brain

Principal Investigator: Dr. Paul Eslinger, Hershey Medical Center, Co-Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, Pennsylvania Department of Health, Tobacco Formula Funded Health Research, $224,410.

1995 – 1996: A dynamical analysis of force production in rhythmic tapping and its application as a diagnostic tool for Parkinson patients.

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Co-Investigator: Dr. Karl Newell. Interdisciplinary Seed Grant of the College of Health and Human Development. $5,000.

1997 – 1998: Individual route planning in large-scale traffic simulations

Principal Investigator: Chris Barrett. Los Alamos National Laboratories and the Santa Fe Institute for Complex Systems, Co-Investigator: Dagmar Sternad, $35,000.

1998 – 1999: NSF: Conference grant: Progress in Motor Control II

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Co-Investigators: Mark Latash and the Conference Organizing Committee. National Science Foundation (NSF), Integrative Biology and Neuroscience. $10,000.

1997 – 2001: NSF-SBR 97-10312: Multi-joint dynamics: A model for discrete and rhythmic movements

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Co-Investigator: Dr. Stefan Schaal, University of Southern California and ATR Human Information Research Laboratories, Japan. National Science Foundation, Social, Behavioral and Economic Research, Human Cognition and Perception, $203,845.

2002: DFG: Sensorimotor control of biped walking: Acquisition of dynamics and statics in the generation of walking patterns

Principal Investigator: Karl-Theodor Kalveram, Department of Psychology, University of Düsseldorf, Germany. Co-Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft (DFG), German equivalent to the National Science Foundation. $3,000. (3-month internships of students in my lab) $50,000.

2005: International conference: Progress in Motor Control V: A multidisciplinary perspective

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. Level–I Proposal to the Children, Youth and Families Consortium, The Pennsylvania State University, $6,000.

2005: NIH: International conference: Progress in Motor Control V: A multidisciplinary perspective

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, $3,000.

2005: International conference: Progress in Motor Control V: A multidisciplinary perspective

Principal Investigator: Dagmar Sternad. The Huck Institute, Pennsylvania State University, $5,000.

2001 – 2005: NSF-BCS-0096543: Discrete and rhythmic dynamics in multijoint movements

Principal Investigator. Dagmar Sternad. Co-Investigator: Stefan Schaal. National Science Foundation, Human Cognition and Perception, $342,902.

 

Publications

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

  1. Sternad, D., Marino, H., Duarte, M., DiPietro, L., Charles, S., & Hogan, N. (under review). Transitions between discrete and rhythmic primitives in a unimanual task. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

  2. Abe, M.O., & Sternad, D. (under review). Directionality in distribution and temporal structure of variability in skill acquisition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

  3. Park, S-W., Dijkstra, T.M.H., & Sternad, D. (under review). Learning to never forget: Specificity of long-term memory of a motor skill.

  4. Hogan, N. & Sternad, D. (2013). Dynamic primitives in the control of locomotion. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

  5. Chu, W.T.V., Sternad, D., & Sanger, T.D. (2013). Healthy and dystonic children compensate for changes in motor variability. Journal of Neurophysiology, epub ahead of print Jan 23. PMID: 23343896

  6. Plummer d’Amato, P., Kyvelidou, A., Sternad, D., Najafi, B., Villalobos, R.M., & Zurakowski, D. (2012). Training dual-task walking in community-dwelling adults within 1 year of stroke: A protocol for a single-blind randomized controlled trial. BMC Neurology, 12, 1, 129.

  7. Hogan, N., & Sternad, D. (2012). Dynamic primitives of motor behavior. Biological Cybernetics, 106 (11-12), 727-739. PMID: 23124919

  8. Hasson, C.J., Shen, T., & Sternad, D. (2012). Energy margins in dynamic object manipulation. Journal of Neurophysiology, 108, 5, 1349-65.

  9. Cohen, R.G. & Sternad, D. (2012). State space analysis of intrinsic timing: Exploiting task redundancy to reduce sensitivity to timing. Journal of Neurophysiology, 107, 2, 618-627.

  10. Sternad, D., Abe, M.O., Hu, X., & Müller, H. (2011). Neuromotor noise, sensitivity to error and signal-dependent noise in trial-to-trial learning. PLoS Computational Biology, 7, 9, e1002159.

  11. Ajemian, R. & Sternad, D. (2010). Theoretical ideas in motor neuroscience and their capacity for falsification. Journal of Motor Behavior, 6, 331-332.

  12. Ronsse, R. & Sternad, D. (2010). Bouncing between model and data: stability, passivity, and optimality in hybrid dynamics. Journal of Motor Behavior, 6, 387-397.

  13. Sternad, D., Park, S., Müller, H., & Hogan, N. (2010). Coordinate dependence of variability analysis. PLOS Computational Biology, 6, 4, e1000751.

  14. Sanger, T.D., Chen, D., Fehlings, D.L., Hallett, M. et al. (2010). Definitions and classification of hyperkinetic movements in childhood. Movement Disorders, 25, 11, 1538-49.

  15. Ronsse, R., Wei, K., & Sternad, D. (2010). Optimal control of a hybrid rhythmic-discrete task: the bouncing ball revisited. Journal of Neurophysiology, 103, 2482-2493.

  16. Ehrlenspiel, F., Wei, K., Sternad, D. (2010). Open-loop, closed-loop, and compensatory control: Performance under pressure in a rhythmic task. Experimental Brain Research, 201, 4, 729-741.

  17. Van der Wel, R.P.R.D., Sternad, D., & Rosenbaum, D.A. (2010). Moving the arm at different rates: Slow movements are avoided. Journal of Motor Behavior, 42, 1, 29-36. PMCID: 3566270

  18. Hogan, N. & Sternad, D. (2009). Sensitivity of smoothness measures to movement duration, amplitude and arrests. Journal of Motor Behavior, 41, 6, 529-534.

  19. Ronsse, R., Sternad, D., & Lefevre, P. (2009). A computational model for rhythmic and discrete movements in uni- and bimanual coordination. Neural Computation, 21, 1335–1370.

  20. Cohen, R.G., & Sternad, D. (2009). Variability in motor learning: Relocating, channeling and reducing noise. Experimental Brain Research, 193, 1, 69-83.

  21. Duarte, M., & Sternad, D. (2008). Complexity of human postural control: Alterations with aging during prolonged standing. Experimental Brain Research, 191(3), 265-276.

  22. Wei, K., Dijkstra, T.M.H., & Sternad, D. (2008). Stability and variability: Indicators for passive stability and active control in a rhythmic task. Journal of Neurophysiology, 99, 3027-3041.

  23. Raftery, A., Cusumano, J., & Sternad, D. (2008). Chaotic frequency scaling in a coupled oscillator model for free rhythmic actions. Neural Computation, 20, 1, 205-226.

  24. Wei, K., Dijkstra, T.M.H., & Sternad, D. (2007). Passive stability and active control in a rhythmic task. Journal of Neurophysiology, 98, 5, 2633-2646.

  25. Hogan, N., & Sternad, D. (2007). On rhythmic and discrete movements: Reflections, definitions and implications for motor control. Experimental Brain Research, 181, 1, 13-30.

  26. Yu, H., Sternad, D., Corcos, D.M., & Vaillancourt, D. (2007). Cerebellum and motor cortex in Parkinson’s disease: Is activation compensatory or disease-related? NeuroImage, 35, 1, 222-233.

  27. Müller, H., Frank, T.D., & Sternad, D. (2007). Variability, covariation and invariance with respect to coordinate systems in motor control. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 33, 1, 250-255.

  28. Sternad, D., Wei, K., Diedrichsen, J., & Ivry, R.B. (2007). Intermanual interactions during initiation and production of rhythmic and discrete movements in individuals lacking a corpus callosum. Experimental Brain Research, 76, 4, 559-574.

  29. Sanger, T., Chen, D., Delgado, M., Gaebler, Spira, D., & Hallett, M. et al. (2006). Definition and classification of negative motor signs in childhood. Pediatrics, 118, 5, 2159-2167.

  30. Schaal, S., Sternad, D., Osu, R., & Kawato, M. (2004). Rhythmic arm movements are not discrete. Nature Neuroscience, 7, 10, 1136-1143.

  31. Sternad, D. & Dijkstra, T.M.H. (2004). Dynamical stability in the acquisition and performance of rhythmic ball manipulation: Theoretical insights with a clinical slant. Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, 21, 3, 215-227.

  32. Dijkstra, T.M.H., Katsumata, H., de Rugy, A., & Sternad, D. (2004). The dialogue between data and model: Passive stability and relaxation behavior in a ball bouncing task. Nonlinear Studies, 11, 3, 319-344.

  33. Müller, H., & Sternad, D. (2004). Accuracy and variability in goal-oriented movements: decomposition of gender differences in children. Journal of Human Kinetics, 12, 31-50.

  34. Müller, H., & Sternad, D. (2004). Decomposition of variability in the execution of goal-oriented tasks – Three components of skill improvement. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 30, 1, 212-233.

  35. De Rugy, A., & Sternad, D. (2003). Interaction between discrete and rhythmic movements: reaction time and phase of discrete movement initiation against oscillatory movements. Brain Research, 994, 160-174.

  36. Sternad, D. & Dean, W.J. (2003). Rhythmic and discrete elements in multi-joint coordination. Brain Research, 989, 152-171.

  1. De Rugy, A., Wei, K., Müller, H., & Sternad, D. (2003). Actively tracking “passive” stability. Brain Research, 982, 1, 64-78.

  2. Wei, K., Wertman, G., & Sternad, D. (2003). Interactions between rhythmic and discrete components in a bimanual task. Motor Control, 7, 2, 134-154.

  3. Müller, H. & Sternad, D. (2003). A randomization method for the calculation of covariation in multiple nonlinear relations: Illustrated at the example of goal-directed movements. Biological Cybernetics, 89, 22-33.

  4. Yu, H., Russell, D.M., & Sternad, D. (2003). Task-effector asymmetries in a rhythmic continuation task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 29, 3, 616-630.

  5. Katsumata, H., Zatsiorsky, V., & Sternad, D. (2003). Control of ball-racket interactions in the rhythmic propulsion of elastic and non-elastic balls. Experimental Brain Research, 149, 17-29.

  6. Sternad, D., de Rugy, A., Pataky, T., & Dean, W.J. (2002). Interactions of discrete and rhythmic movements over a wide range of periods. Experimental Brain Research, 147, 162-174.

  7.  Katsumata, H. & Sternad, D. (2002). Movement coordination from a dynamical systems perspective. Japanese Journal of Biomechanics in Sports and Exercise, 6, 2, 76-95.

  8. Sternad, D. (2002). Wachholder and Altenburger 1927: Foundational experiments for current hypotheses on equilibrium point control in voluntary movements. Motor Control, 6, 299-318.

  9. Sternad, D. & Corcos, D. (2001). Effect of task and instruction on patterns of muscle activation: Wachholder and beyond. Motor Control, 5, 4, 307-336.

  1. Sternad, D., Duarte, M., Katsumata, H., & Schaal, S. (2001). Bouncing a ball: Tuning into dynamic stability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27, 5, 1163-1184.

  2. Russell, D. & Sternad, D. (2001). Sinusoidal visuomotor tracking: Intermittent servo-control or coupled oscillations? Journal of Motor Behavior, 33, 4, 329-349.

  3. Schaal, S., & Sternad, D. (2001). Origins and violations of the 2/3 power law in rhythmic three-dimensional arm movements. Experimental Brain Research, 136, 1, 60-72.

  4. Dingwell, J.B., Cusumano, J.P., Cavanagh, P.R., & Sternad D. (2001). Local dynamic stability versus kinematic variability of continuous overground and treadmill walking. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 123, 1, 27-32.

  5. Sternad, D., Duarte, M., Katsumata, H., & Schaal, S. (2001). Dynamics of a bouncing ball in human performance. Physical Review E, 63, 011902-1 –011902-8.

  6. Sternad, D. (2000). Debates in dynamics: A dynamic systems perspective on perception and action. Human Movement Science, 19, 407-423.

  7. Sternad, D., Dean, W.J., & Schaal, S. (2000). Interaction of rhythmic and discrete pattern generators in single-joint movements. Human Movement Science, 19, 627-664.

  8. Sternad, D., & Katsumata, H. (2000). Dynamic stability in the acquisition and performance of a rhythmic skill: An example for a perception-action approach. Journal of Human Kinetics, 4, 57-73.

  9. Sternad, D., Dean, W.J., & Newell, K.M. (2000). Force and timing variability in rhythmic unimanual tapping. Journal of Motor Behavior, 32, 3, 249-267.

  10. Dingwell, J.B., Cusumano, J.P. Sternad D., & Cavanagh, P.R. (2000). Slower speeds in patients with diabetic neuropathy lead to improved local dynamic stability of continuous overground walking. Journal of Biomechanics, 33, 10, 1269-1277.

  11. Sternad, D. (1999). Juggling or bouncing balls: Parallels and differences in dynamic concepts and tools. International Journal of Sport Psychology, 30, 4, 462-489.

  12. Sternad, D., Turvey, M.T., & Saltzman, E.L.  (1999). Dynamics of 1:2 coordination:  Generalizing relative phase to n:m rhythms. Journal of Motor Behavior, 31, 3, 207-223.

  13. Sternad, D., Turvey, M.T., & Saltzman, E.L.  (1999). Dynamics of 1:2 coordination:  Sources of symmetry breaking. Journal of Motor Behavior, 31, 3, 224-235.

  14. Sternad, D., Turvey, M.T., & Saltzman, E.L.  (1999). Dynamics of 1:2 coordination:  Temporal scaling, latent 1:1, and bistability. Journal of Motor Behavior, 31, 3, 236-247.

  15. Sternad, D., & Schaal, S. (1999). Segmentation of endpoint trajectories does not imply segmented control. Experimental Brain Research, 124, 118-136.

  16. Sternad, D. (1999). Antipodean perspective(s) to motor control. Review Essay on Piek (Ed.): Human motor control. A multidisciplinary perspective. Motor Control, 3, 1, 90-99.

  17. Walter, C., Lee, T., & Sternad, D. (1998). Hot topics in motor control and learning: Introduction – The dynamic systems approach to motor control and learning:  Promises, potential limitations and future directions. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 69, 4, 316-318.

  18. Sternad, D. (1998). A dynamic systems perspective to perception and action. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 69, 4, 319-326.
  1. Sternad, D., Saltzman, E.L., & Turvey, M.T. (1998). Interlimb coupling in a simple serial behavior: A task dynamic approach. Human Movement Science, 17, 393-433.

  2. Sternad, D & Newell, K.M. (1997). Modeling movement variability in space and time. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 30, 322.

  3. Collins, D.R., Sternad, D., & Turvey, M.T. (1996). An experimental note on defining frequency competition in intersegmental coordination dynamics. Journal of Motor Behavior, 28, 299-303.

  4. Amazeen, E.L., Sternad, D., & Turvey, M.T. (1996). Predicting the nonlinear shift of stable equilibria in interlimb rhythmic coordination. Human Movement Science, 15, 521-542.

  5. Sternad, D., Amazeen, E.L., & Turvey, M.T. (1996). Diffusive, synaptic and synergetic coupling: An evaluation through inphase and antiphase rhythmic movements. Journal of Motor Behavior, 28, 3, 255-269.

  6. Schaal, S., Atkeson, C.G., & Sternad, D. (1996). One-handed juggling: A dynamical approach to a rhythmic task. Journal of Motor Behavior, 28, 2, 165-183.

  7. Sternad, D., & Turvey, M.T. (1995). Control parameters, equilibria and coordination dynamics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 18, 780.

  8. Sternad, D., Collins, D.R., & Turvey, M.T. (1995). The detuning factor in the dynamics of interlimb rhythmic coordination. Biological Cybernetics, 73, 27-35.

  9. Sternad, D., Turvey, M.T., & Schmidt, R.C. (1992). Average phase difference theory and 1:1 phase entrainment in interlimb coordination. Biological Cybernetics, 67, 223-231.

  10. Haas, W., & Sternad, D. (1986). Leistungsphysiologische Aspekte in Aerobic (Physiological aspects of aerobics), Sporttraumatologie, 1, 23-31.

Books

  1. Sternad, D. (Editor, 2009). Progress in motor control – A multidisciplinary perspective. New York: Springer.

Popular Books

  1. Sternad, D. (2002). Stretching. München: Blv-Verlagsgesellschaft.

  2. Sternad, D. (1999/1987). Richtig Stretching (9th revised edition). München: Blv-Verlagsgesellschaft. Translated into 5 languages (French, Spanish, Italian, Hungarian, Dutch).

  3. Sternad, D., & Bozdech, K. (1990). Spaß mit Stretching (2nd ed.). München: Blv-Verlagsgesellschaft.

  4. Sternad, D. (1989). Tag für Tag topfit. München: Blv-Verlagsgesellschaft. 

  5. Sternad, D. (1984). Gymnastik. Beweglichkeit, Kräftigung und Ausdauer für alle (2nd ed.). München: Blv-Verlagsgesellschaft.

Book Chapters

  1. Sternad, D. (2013). Variability and noise in skill acquisition. Progress in motor control.
  2. Sternad, D. & Abe, M.O. (2011). Variability, noise, and sensitivity to error in learning a motor task. In F. Danion & M.L. Latash (eds.), Progress in motor control: theories, experiments, and applications (pp.267-295). New York: Springer.

  3. Müller, H. & Sternad, D. (2009). Motor learning: Changes in the structure of variability in a redundant task. In D. Sternad (Ed.), Progress in motor control – A multidisciplinary perspective (pp.439-456). New York: Oxford University Press.

  4. Sternad, D. (2008). Towards a unified framework for rhythmic and discrete movements: behavioral, modeling and imaging results. In A. Fuchs & V. Jirsa (Eds.), Coordination: neural, behavioral and social dynamics (pp.105-136). New York: Springer.

  5. Sternad, D. (2006). Stability and variability in skilled rhythmic actions – a dynamical analysis of rhythmic ball bouncing. In M.L. Latash & F. Lestienne (Eds.), Motor control and learning (pp.55-63). New York: Springer.

  6. Sternad, D. (2001). Kurt Wachholder: Pioneering electrophysiological investigations on voluntary movements. In M.L. Latash & V.M. Zatsiorsky (Eds.), Classics in movement science (pp.375-408). Urbana Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

  7. Russell, D.M., Yu, H., & Sternad, D. (2001). The maintenance tendency during a rhythmic continuation task (pp.145-148). In G.A. Burton & R.C. Schmidt (Eds.), Studies in Perception and Action VI. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

  8. Sternad, D., & Katsumata, H. (2000). The role of dynamic stability for the acquisition and performance of a rhythmic skill. In J. Raczek, Z. Waskiewicz, & G. Juras (Eds.), Current research in motor control (pp.55-62). Katowice, PL: Polish Scientific Physical Education Association.

  9. Sternad, D., Katsumata, H., Duarte, M., & Schaal, S. (1999). Perceptual information and dynamic stability in a one-handed juggling task. In M. Grealy & J. Thomson (Eds.), Studies in Perception and Action V (pp.170-174). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

  10. Sternad, D., Dean, W.J., & Schaal, S. (1999). Interaction of discrete and rhythmic dynamics in single-joint movements. In M. Grealy & J. Thomson (Eds.), Studies in Perception and Action V (pp.282-287). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

  11. Dean, W. J., Newell, K.M., & Sternad, D. (1999). Force and timing variability and natural frequency in rhythmic tapping. In M. Grealy & J. Thomson (Eds.), Studies in Perception and Action V (pp.175-178). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

  12. Russell, D.M. & Sternad, D. (1999). Changes in multifrequency coordination across practice. In M. Grealy & J. Thomson (Eds.), Studies in Perception and Action V (pp.293-296). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

  13. Sternad, D. (1998). A dynamic systems’ perceptive to perception and action. In P. Blaser (Ed.), Sport Kinetics ‘97: Theories of human motor performance and their reflection in practice (pp.45-54). Hamburg: Zwalina Verlag.

  14. Sternad, D. (1997). Die amerikanische Bernstein-Rezeption und die USA-Konferenz "Bernstein's traditions in motor control". In P. Hirtz & F. Nüske (Eds.), Die 2. Bernstein-Konferenz (pp.22-33). Hamburg: Cwalina dvs-Schriftenreihe.

  15. Sternad, D., & Saltzman, E.L. (1995). Dynamics of 1:2 coordination. In B. Bardy, R. Bootsma, & Y. Guiard (Eds.), Studies in Perception and Action III (pp.57-61). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

  16. Sternad, D., Schaal, S., & Atkeson, C.G. (1995). Batting a ball: Dynamics of a rhythmic skill. In B. Bardy, R. Bootsma, & Y. Guiard (Eds.), Studies in Perception and Action III (pp.119-223). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

  17. Beek, P., & Sternad, D. (1994). Koordination und Kontrolle von sportmotorischen Fertigkeiten aus ökologischer Perspektive (Coordination and control of sport skills from an ecological perspective). In K.-H. Leist, D. Hackfort & J. Loibl (Eds.), Ordnungs- und Organisationsleistungen menschlicher Motorik (pp.73-84). München: TU-Verlag.

  18. Translation of: Shaw, R.E., Flasher, O.M., & Mace, W.M. (1994). Dimensions of event perception. In the German edition of W. Prinz & B. Bridgeman (Eds.), Handbook of Perception and Action. Vol I. London: Academic Press.

  19. Sternad, D., & Schaal, S. (1993). A genetic algorithm for evolution from an ecological perspective. Santa Fe Institute Proceedings. In L. Nadel & D. Stein (Eds.), 1992 Lectures on Complex Systems. Vol V (pp.647-663). Redwood, CA: Addison Wesley.

  20. Schaal, S., & Sternad, D. (1993). Learning of passive motor control strategies with genetic algorithms. Santa Fe Institute Proceedings. In L. Nadel & D. Stein (Eds.), 1992 Lectures on Complex Systems. Vol V (pp.631-645). Redwood, CA: Addison Wesley.

 

Public Dissemination of Research Results

  1. Video in Engadgets, Northeastern University’s haptic ball-racket system is one pricey game of paddle ball. November 14, 2012.  http://www.viddler.com/v/b41e038f
  2. NSF Highlights, Perception, Action & Cognition, Dynamics of action and perception in a rhythmic task, February 2011.
  3. STEM Research Symposium for Students, Northeastern University. The brain and the exponential power of handwriting – From Movements to Mathematics (&back). April 15, 2010.
  4. NSF Highlights, Perception, Action & Cognition, Dynamics of action and perception in a rhythmic task, May 2007.
  5. Press Release and News and Views in Nature Neuroscience: Miall, C.R. & Ivry, R. (2004). Moving to a different beat. Nature Neuroscience, 7, 10, 1025-1026.
  6. Technological Research News, February 28, 2001: Robots learn soft touch. http://www.trnmag.com/Stories/022801/Robots_learn_soft_touch_022801.html
  7. Nature Science Update, January 28, 2001: Chaos on center court. http://www.nature.com/nsu/010104/010104-9.html
  8. Plus, Issue 16, 09/01: Robots can’t play tennis - yet. http://plus.maths.org/issue16/news/tennis/
  9. Revista Pesquisa Fapesp, Edition 67, 08/01: Movement under measure.

 

Conference Proceedings

  1. Huber, M.E., Leeser, M., & Sternad, D. (2013). Development of a low-cost, adaptive, clinician-friendly virtual rehabilitation system. Proceedings for the 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation, Philadelphia, PA, August 26-29.
  2. Hasson, C.J., Hogan, N., & Sternad, D. (2012). Human control of dynamically complex objects. Proceedings of the 4th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob2012), Rome, Italy, June 24-28.
  3. Lee, M., Roan, M., Sternad, D. & van Werkhoven, H. (2006). Gait analysis to detect hidden external loads. Biomedical Engineering Society Fall Meeting, Chicago, IL, Oct 18-20.
  4. Erdley, J., Weiss, L., Long, L., Sternad, D., Murphy, K., Roan, M. (2006).  “Predicting precursors to IED deployment,” 7th International Symposium on Technology and the Mine Problem, Monterey, CA, May 2-4.
  5. Schaal, S., Kotosaka, S., Sternad, D. (2000). Nonlinear dynamical systems as movement primitives, Proceedings of the 1st IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robotics, 1425-1436.
  6. Schaal, S., Sternad, D., Dean, W.J., Kotosaka, S., Osu, R., & Kawato, M. (2000). Reciprocal excitation between biological and robotic research. Sensor Fusion and Decentralized Control in Robotic Systems III, Proceedings of SPIE, 30-40.
  7. Dingwell, J.B., Cusumano, J.P., Cavanagh, P.R., & Sternad, D. (1999). Stride-to-stride variability in human walking is not noise. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics, 58-59.
  8. Dingwell, J.B., Cusumano, J.P., Cavanagh, P.R., & Sternad, D. (1999). Walking variability and stability in diabetic neuropathy. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics, 60-61.
  9. Dingwell, J.B., Cavanagh, P.R., & Sternad, D. (1999). Dynamic analysis of human walking: Treadmills, loss of sensation, and comparisons with surrogate data. DETC99/VIB-8360, Proceedings of the 1999 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences, 120-129.
  10. Schaal, S. & Sternad, D. (1998). Programmable pattern generators. 3rd International Conference on Computational Intelligence in Neuroscience, 48-51.
  11. Dingwell, J.B., Cusumano, J.P., Sternad, D., and Cavanagh, P.R. (1998). Beyond 3D: A nonlinear dynamics approach to the analysis of human locomotion. Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on the 3-D Analysis of Human Movement, 140-143.
  12. Dingwell, J.B., Cusumano, J.P., Sternad, D., & Cavanagh, P.R. (1998). Using Lyapunov exponents to quantify dynamic stability during continuous overground locomotion. Proceedings of the Third North American Congress on Biomechanics, 125-126.
  13. Dingwell, J.B., Ulbrecht, J.S., Sternad, D., & Cavanagh, P.R. (1997). Variability of neuropathic and non-neuropathic subjects walking on a motorized treadmill. Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference of the American Society of Biomechanics, 254-255.

 

Invited Presentations

1.     “Variability and noise in skill acquisition”. Progress in Motor Control, Montreal, Canada, July 14-16, 2013.

2.      “Variability in learning sensorimotor skills”. Max-Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Tübingen, Germany, June 18, 2013.

3.      “Variability and noise in skill acquisition”. 10th Motor Control Summer School, Antiochian Village, Ligonier, PA, July 8-11, 2013.

4.     “Rhythm ‘n’ moves: A window into brain and behavior”. Keynote at the Eastern New England Biology Conference, Northeastern University, April 20, 2013 (Keynote talk).

5.     “Rhythm movements: A window into brain and behavior”. Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, March 25, 2013.

6.     “Sensorimotor skill: Analysis of variability as a window into control.” Applied Mathematics Interdisciplinary Seminar, Northeastern University, January 15, 2013.

7.     “Sensorimotor skills: Mechanics and neurophysiology constrains optimization and rehabilitation”. 35th National Congress in Biomedical Engineering, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, October 5, 2012. (Keynote talk).

8.     “Stability and variability in learning a novel motor skill”. Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville FL, September 6, 2012.

9.      “Towards coordinate-free analysis of motor variability”. Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy, June 24-28, 2012.

10.  “Human control of dynamically complex objects”. Biorob 2012, Rome, Italy, June 24, 2012.

11.  “A neuroscience perspective for upper limb rehabilitation.” Biorob 2012, Rome, Italy, June 26, 2012.

12.  “Multiple solutions in skilled performance – Error tolerance and variability”. Neural Control of Movement, Venice, Italy, April 29, 2012.

13.  “Stability and variability in learning interactive tasks”. Department of Cognitive Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, February 29, 2012.

14.  “Human motor performance: Exploiting stability, channeling variability, and tuning safety margins”. Universite Catholique de Louvain, Center for Research in Mechatronic, Louvain, Belgium, December 19, 2011.

15.  “Rhythm ‘n’ moves –A window into brain and behavior”. Universite Catholique de Louvain, Biomedical Engineering, Louvain, Belgium, December 19, 2011.

16.  “Scientific discoveries: Understanding the brain to combat neurological disorders - one step at a time”. Holiday Presentation at the Cape Cod Alumni Chapter of Northeastern Faculty, December 10, 2011.

17.  “Rhythm ‘n’ moves –A window into brain and behavior” Computational Neuroscience, Brandeis University, Waltham MA, November 7, 2011.

18.  “Motor skill: Exploiting stability, channeling variability, and tuning safety margins”. 33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC ’11), Boston, MA, September 1, 2011.

19.  “Stability and variability in learning an interactive task”. VII Computational Motor Control Workshop, Israel, June 12-17, 2011.

20.  “Noise, covariation, and tolerance to error in learning a motor skill.” The Weizmann Institute of Science, Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Rehovot, Israel, June 20, 2011.

21.  “Bouncing balls: Stability and variability in learning and performance of a rhythmic task.” Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Mechanical Engineering, Technion City, Haifa, Israel, June 13, 2011.

22.  “Motor skills: Exploiting stability, channeling variability, and optimizing safety margins”. Center for Complex Network Research, Northeastern University, April 15, 2011.

23.  “Variability and stability in interactive tasks: From motor learning to neuro-recovery”. BioRobotics Laboratory, School of Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 2, 2010.

24.  The brain and the exponential power of handwriting – From Movements to Mathematics (and back)”. STEM Research Symposium for Students, Northeastern University, April 15, 2010.

25.  “The neuroscience of interactive tasks: From motor learning to neuro-recovery”. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Mexico, March 3, 2010.

26.  “Variability, noise, and sensitivity to error in learning a motor task”. Forschungszentrums Netzindustrien und Infrastruktur (CNI), Technical University, Berlin, Germany, September 21, 2009.

27.  “Variability, noise, and sensitivity to error in learning a motor task”. Computational Principles of Sensorimotor Learning, Kloster Irsee, Germany, September 13-15, 2009.

28.  “Dynamic stability and active control in a rhythmic task – A dialogue between data and model”. Satellite Symposium on Theoretical Motor Neuroscience at the 19th Annual Conference of Neural Control of Movement, Waikoloa Beach, April 28 – May 3, 2009.

29.  “Variability, noise, and sensitivity to error in learning a motor task”. Computational Science Invited Lectures, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, February 9, 2009.

30.  “Variability, noise, and sensitivity to error in learning a motor task”. Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Göttingen, Germany, January 13, 2009.

31.  Dynamical stability and variability in human sensorimotor control: Passive stability and active control in a rhythmic task“. Northeastern University, Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Complex Systems (CIRCS), Boston, December 2, 2008.

32.  “Variability, covariation and sensorimotor noise in motor learning and retention”. Society for Engineering Science, Champaign Urbana IL, October 12-14, 2008.

33.  “Stochastic resonance in the acquisition and control of a perceptual-motor skill”. The Turvey Transition, University of Connecticut, June 19-21, 2008.

34.  “Variability, noise and sensitivity to error in motor learning”. Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford Medical Center, Stanford University, CA, March 20, 2008.

35.  “Rhythm ‘n’ moves – A window into brain and behavior”. Institute for Research in Cognitive Science, University of Pennsylvania (IRCS), Philadelphia, February 1, 2008.

36.  “Variability, covariation and equifinality in motor learning and retention”. Institute for Sport Sciences, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany, January 11, 2008.

37.  “Stability and variability in rhythmic and discrete tasks”. International Conference Progress in Motor Control VI, Brazil, August 18-21, 2007.

38.  “Stability and variability in a rhythmic task: Passive stability and active control in ball bouncing”. Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium, May 8, 2007.

39.  “Towards a framework for rhythmic and discrete movements – Behavioral results, modeling and brain imaging. Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, April 6, 2007.

40.  “Analysis of rhythmic and discrete movements: Issues of timing, coordinate systems and primitives.” Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, April 5, 2007.

41.  “Towards a framework for rhythmic and discrete dynamics: Behavioral results, modeling and brain imaging.” Conference and Festschrift for Scott Kelso, Boca Raton, FL, February 23-25, 2007.

42.  “Stability and perturbation analyses in a rhythmic task”. Workshop on “Mathematical stability analyses in biomechanics und robotics.” Center for Interdisciplinary Research, University of Bielefeld, Germany, February 15-17, 2007.

43.  “Rhythm ‘n’ Moves – Behavioral, modeling, and fMRI results on rhythmic and discrete movements”, Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Germany, December 20, 2006.

44.  “Rhythmic and discrete movements – Behavioral and fMRI results.” Crossover 2006, Conference at Penn State organized by the Huck Institute, University Park, PA, October 12, 2006.

45.  “Rhythm ‘n’ Moves – Behavioral, modeling, and fMRI results on rhythmic and discrete movements” Behavioral and Brain Sciences, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Great Britain, September 5, 2006.

46.  “Two types of control for rhythmic and discrete movements? New results from fMRI.” Symposium at the Annual Conference of the North American Society for Sport Psychology and Physical Activity, June 3, 2006.

47.  “Variability and stability in a rhythmic task: Active and passive control in ball bouncing.” Department of Psychology, Wright State University, Dayton, OH, February 24, 2006.

48.  “Securing a reliable outcome in short goal-oriented movements – Three components of skill improvement”. International Conference on Progress in Motor Control V – A Multidisciplinary Perspective, State College, PA, August 17-20, 2005.

49.  “Discrete and rhythmic movements as two units of action: fMRI, behavioral and modeling results.” Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, March 11, 2005.

50.  “Discrete and rhythmic movements as two units of action: fMRI, behavioral and modeling results.” Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, March 7, 2005.

51.  “Rhythm ‘n’ Moves – A window into brain and behavior.” National Science Foundation, Washington, DC, February 12, 2005.

52.  “Rhythm ‘n’ Moves – A window into brain and behavior.” Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, February 14, 2005.

53.  “Rhythm ‘n’ Moves – A window into brain and behavior.” Department of Kinesiology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, February 7, 2005.

54.  “The role of resonance in the timing of rhythmic movements”. International Scientific Congress on Motor Control, Wisla, Poland, October 23-26, 2004.

55.  “Rhythm ‘n’ Movement.” Summer Academy of the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes, St. Johann, Italy, September 8, 2004.

56.  “Rhythmic timing and resonance constraints.” 28th International Conference on Psychology, August 8-13, 2004, Beijing, China.

57.  “Discrete and rhythmic movements as two units of action: fMRI and behavioral results.” Donders Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Nijmegen, Netherlands, June 24, 2004.

58.  “Paradigms in motor control - Overview and examples from a dynamical systems perspective”. Institute for Biomechanics, University of Jena, Germany, June 30, 2004.

59.  “Tuning into dynamic stability: Acquisition and performance of a rhythmic ball skill.” Invited presentation at the International Conference Progress in Motor Control IV, Caen, France, August 22, 2003.

60.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as primitives in the control and coordination of action.” Max Planck Institute for Psychological Research, Munich, Germany, August 14, 2003.

61.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as primitives in the control and coordination of action.” Institute of Mathematics and Signal Processing, University of the Armed Forces, Munich, Germany, August 13, 2003.

62.  “Period drift and variability in a rhythmic task - Signatures of an oscillator.” Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, May 9, 2003.

63.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as primitives in the control and coordination of action: Behavioral data and brain imaging”. Department of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, December 9, 2002.

64.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as primitives in the control and coordination of action: Behavioral data and brain imaging”. Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, October 24, 2002.

65.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as primitives in the control and coordination of action: Behavioral data and a dynamical model”. Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, October 18, 2002.

66.  “Acquisition and performance of a rhythmic skill”. Symposium of the “Movement Club” at the University of Paris Sud XI, Paris, September 24, 2002.

67.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as units of coordinated action: Behavioral data, a dynamic model, and brain imaging results “ Department of Mouvement and Perception, University of Marseille, France, September 18, 2002.

68.  “Ball bouncing: Acquisition and performance of a rhythmic skill”. Center for Research in Sport Sciences University of Paris Sud XI, Paris, May 30, 2002.

69.  “Dynamical stability and visual information in rhythmic ball manipulation”. Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, October 11, 2001.

70.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as primitives in the control and coordination of action: Behavioral data and a dynamical model”. Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, October 12, 2001.

71.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as units of coordinated action: Behavioral data, a dynamic model, and brain imaging results”, Department of Movement Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, May 11, 2001.

72.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as units of coordinated action: Behavioral data, a dynamic model, and brain imaging results”. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.

73.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as units of coordinated action: Behavioral data, a dynamic model, and brain imaging results“. Medical School and Clinic for Child Neurology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, April 9, 2001.

74.  “Discrete and rhythmic dynamics as units of coordinated action: Behavioral data, a dynamic model, and brain imaging results“. Department of Psychology, Berkeley University, Berkeley, CA April 6, 2001.

75.  “The role of dynamic stability for the acquisition and performance of a rhythmic skill.” University School of Physical Education, University of Katowice, Poland, October 26, 2000.

76.  “Rhythm and movement – A dynamic systems perspective”. Academy of Physical Education, University of Wroclaw, Poland, October 22, 2000.

77.  “The role of dynamic stability for the acquisition and performance of a rhythmic skill”. Invited presentation at the International Scientific Conference Motor Control 2000 at the Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, Poland, October 27 - 29.

78.  “A dynamic systems perspective to interlimb and intralimb coordination”. Department of Sport Science, Technical University of Munich, Germany, July 27, 2000.

79.  “Planarity and 2/3 power law in endpoint trajectories of 3D drawing movements”. Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Germany, July 20, 2000.

80.  “Coordination and control of actions: From intralimb to interlimb coordination”. The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM, June 16, 2000.

81.  “Coupled oscillations as a model for bimanual coordination: From interlimb to intralimb coordination”. Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus OH, October 22, 1999.

82.  "Interaction of rhythmic and discrete pattern generators in human point-to-point movements." Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Medical College of Pennsylvania/Hahnemann Medical School, Allegheny University, Philadelphia, PA, May 12, 1999.

83.  "Planarity and 2/3 power law in endpoint trajectories of 3D drawing movements: Generating mechanisms or epiphenomena?" Center for the Ecological Study of Perception and Action, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, March, 1999.

84.  “Coordination and control of actions: A dynamic approach to multi-joint movements”. The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM, December, 1998.

85.  “2/3 power law and movement segmentation in 3D arm movements.” Center for Complex Systems, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, April, 1998.

86.  “A dynamic system’s perspective on issues in motor control.” Technical University of Munich, Germany, December, 1997.

87.  “The dynamic systems approach to movement control.” Keynote address at the conference “Sport Kinetics ‘97”, Magdeburg, Germany, 1997.

88.  "Oscillatory dynamics for multi-joint coordination." Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Canada, July, 1997.

89.  "The dynamic systems approach to perception and action: From interlimb to intralimb coordination". Kawato Dynamic Brain Project, ERATO, Japan, June 23, 1997.

90.  "Dynamics of 1:2 coordination in bimanual rhythmic movement." The Santa Fe Institute for Complex Systems, Santa Fe, NM, April, 1997.

91.  "Bouncing of a ball: Dynamic stability and the role of visual and haptic perception." Los Alamos National Laboratory, TSA-DO/SA MS M997, Los Alamos, NM, April, 1997.

92.  "Dynamics of 1:2 coordination in bimanual rhythmic movement." Center for Complex Systems, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, February, 1997.

93.  "Dynamics of 1:2 coordination in bimanual rhythmic movement." Department for Cybernetic Psychology, University of Düsseldorf, Germany, September, 1996.

94.  “Die amerikanische Bernstein-Rezeption und die USA-Konferenz zu Bernstein’s Tradition in Motor Control” (The American Bernstein reception and the US conference on Bernstein’s traditions in motor control.) Keynote presentation at the 2. Bernstein-Konferenz: Bewegungskoordination und sportliche Leistung integrativ betrachtet, Zinnowitz/Usedom, Germany, September, 1996.

95.  "Perceptual control of movement, units of action, and dynamical approaches." Los Alamos National Laboratory, TSA-DO/SA MS M997, Los Alamos, NM, May, 1996.

96.  "A dynamical perspective on the control and coordination of movement." Department for Computer and Information Science, GRASP Lab, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 1995.

97.  "Diffusive, synaptic and synergetic coupling: An evaluation through inphase and antiphase rhythmic movements." Department for Cybernetic Psychology, University of Düsseldorf, Germany, 1994.

98.  "Average phase difference theory and 1:1 phase entrainment in interlimb coordination." Complex Systems Summer School, Santa Fe, NM, 1992.

99.  "Average phase difference theory and 1:1 phase entrainment in interlimb coordination." 3. dvs-Sommerakademie (Deutsche Vereinigung für Sportwissenschaften), Berlin, 1992.

100. "On the dynamics of serial order in human coordination." Max-Planck-Institut für Psychologie, München,1991.

101. "Average phase difference theory and 1:1 phase entrainment in interlimb coordination." Department of Psychology, University of Amherst, MA, 1991.

102. "Neurophysiological aspects of endurance training on the example of aerobics." Symposium on Sports Medicine, München, 1989.

103. "Neurophysiological Aspects of Aerobics and Stretching." Institute for Sports Medicine, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1987.

 

II. Teaching

Courses Taught

Summer 2013

 

One-month full-immersion summer school on STEM education for freshmen and sophomores (co-taught): Summer Discovery Program PRISM

Spring 2013

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Undergraduate course (co-taught): Exploration and research: Mathematics, Physics, and Biology

Fall 2012

 

Graduate course: Advanced topics: “Motor learning”

Summer 2012

 

One-month full immersion summer school for freshmen and sophomores (co-taught): Summer Discovery PRISM

Spring 2012

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Undergraduate course (co-taught): Exploration and research: Mathematics, Physics, and Biology

Fall 2011

 

Graduate course: Advanced Topics in Integrative Biology: “Motor learning”

Summer 2011

 

One-month full immersion summer school for freshmen and sophomores (co-taught): Summer Discovery PRISM

Spring 2011

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Undergraduate course (co-taught): Exploration and research: Mathematics, Physics, and Biology

Fall 2010

 

Graduate course: Advanced topics: “Movement neuroscience”

Summer 2010

 

One-month full immersion summer school for freshmen and sophomores (co-taught): Summer Discovery PRISM

Spring 2010

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Undergraduate course (co-taught): Exploration and research: Mathematics, Physics, and Biology

Fall 2009

 

Graduate course: Advanced topics: “Movement neuroscience”

Fall 2007

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Fall 2006

 

Graduate course: “Paradigms in motor control: Stability and variability”

Fall 2005

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Fall 2004

 

Graduate course: “Paradigms in motor control”

Spring 2004

 

Undergraduate course: “Skill acquisition”

Fall 2003

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Spring 2002

 

Undergraduate course: “Movement forms”

Undergraduate course: “Movement skills: An introduction into motor control”

Fall 2001

 

Graduate course: “Dynamical systems perspective to action”

Spring 2001

 

Undergraduate course: “Movement forms”

Spring 2001

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Fall 2000

 

Undergraduate course: “Movement skills: An introduction into motor control”

Spring 2000

 

Graduate course: “Multidisciplinary approaches to motor control”

Spring 2000

 

Undergraduate course: “Movement forms”

Fall 1999

 

Undergraduate course: “Movement skills: An introduction into motor control”

Spring 1999

 

Undergraduate course: “Skill Acquisition”

Spring 1999

 

Undergraduate class on “Movement forms”

Fall 1998

 

Reading seminar for graduate students

Fall 1998

 

Undergraduate class on “Movement skills: An introduction into motor control”

Spring 1998

 

Undergraduate class on “Movement forms”

Spring 1998

:

Graduate Seminar on “A dynamic perspective on perceptual control of movement”

Fall 1997

:

Undergraduate class on “Movement skills: An introduction into motor control”

Spring 1997

:

Undergraduate class on “Movement forms”

Co-teaching of graduate seminar on “Dynamic systems perspective on movement coordination”

Fall 1996

:

Undergraduate class on “Movement skills: An introduction into motor control”

Spring 1996

:

Undergraduate class on “Movement skills: An introduction into motor control”

Fall 1995

:

Undergraduate class on “Movement acquisition”

Summer Schools Taught

 

May 9 -13, 2012

 

PRISM Summer Discovery Experience, Northeastern University (one week of introduction to the scientific process)

May 9 -13, 2011

 

PRISM Summer Discovery Experience, Northeastern University (one week of introduction to the scientific process)

May 10-14, 2010

 

PRISM Summer Discovery Experience, Northeastern University (one week of introduction to the scientific process)

July 7 - 11, 2004

 

First Summer School of the International Society for Motor Control, Jim Thorpe, PA

Aug 29 – Sept 11, 2004

 

Annual Summer Academy of the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes (National Fellowship of Germany), St. Johann, Italy

Student Supervision

Students Graduated Under My Supervision

Name

Time in Action Lab

Thesis Title

Time of Completion

William Dean

1995 - 1997

Force and timing variability in rhythmic unimanual tapping

MS: July 1997

 

Daniel Russell

1996 - 2000

Task-effector asymmetries in visually guided rhythmic movements

PhD: May 2000

William Dean

1997 - 2001

Rhythmical and discrete movement patterns in the upper extremity

PhD: December 2001

Kunlin Wei

2000 - 2002

Interaction of rhythmic and discrete elements in unimanual and bimanual movements

MS: July 2002

Hiromu Katsumata

1997 - 2002

Acquisition and performance of rhythmic ball bouncing: Attuning to dynamical stability

PhD: August 2002

Hong Yu

2001 - 2005

Rhythmic timing in human movements: Behavioral data, a model and fMRI studies

PhD: August 2005

Kunlin Wei

2002 - 2007

Bouncing a ball: Stability and variability in a rhythmic task

PhD: May 2007

Xiaogang Hu

2006-2008

The role of variability in the control and learning of a throwing task

MS: August 2008

Rajal Cohen

2005 – 2008

Variability in motor learning

Minor Degree in Kinesiology

PhD and Minor Degree: August 2008

 

 

 

Member on Student Thesis Committee

Name

Thesis Title

Time of Completion

Allen Wolstenholme

The swimming relay exchange: An investigation of movement timing

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Bob Eckhardt

MS: August 1996

Penn State University

Michael Broderick

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Karl Newell

PhD: September 1997

Penn State University

 

Jon Dingwell

Variability and nonlinear dynamics of continuous locomotion: Applications to treadmill walking and diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Major: Kinesiology, Minor: Mechanical Engineering, Advisor: Peter Cavanagh

PhD: December 1998

Penn State University

Matt Rearick

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Bob Eckhardt

MS: May 1998

Paola Cesari

Scaling of human grip configurations

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Karl Newell

PhD: August 1999

Penn State University

Laura Julien

Connections between anxiety, cognitive functioning, and coping in multiple sclerosis

Major: Psychology, Advisor: Peter Annett

PhD: August 2001

   Psychology, Penn State

Harmen Slijper

Sensory aspects and central organization of anticipatory postural adjustments

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Mark Latash

PhD: December 2001

Penn State University

 

 

Mohamed Tlili

Approche dynamique des mouvements cycliques complexes: application au jonglage en football et du dribble en basket (A dynamical systems approach to complex cyclic movements: soccer juggling and basketball dribbling ball)

Major: Human Movement Science, Advisor: Denis Mottet

 

PhD: May 2002

University of Poitiers, France

 

Kunlin Wei

Gait recognition: Model validation approach and Martin distance approach

Major: Electrical Engineering, Advisor: Mario Snzaier

 

MS: December 2003

Penn State University

 

Felix Ehrlenspiel

Choking under Pressure - Aufmerksamkeit und Bewegungskontrolle in Leistungssituationen (Attention and motor control in pressurized situations)

Major: Psychology, Advisor: Reinhard Kliegl

 

PhD: Fall 2006

University of Potsdam, Germany

 

Robrecht van der Wel

Subdivision of time intervals: a new method for determining preferred movement speed

Major: Psychology, Advisor: David Rosenbaum

 

MS: August 2006

Penn State University

 

Lee Hong

Constraint-driven redundancy and uncertainty in the control of human action

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Karl Newell

PhD: May 2007

Penn State University

 

Tjitske Boonstra

Variability and stability during the acquisition of ball bouncing

Major: Human Movement Sciences, Advisor: Peter Beek

MS: October 2006

Free University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

 

Robin Salesse

La dynamique des coordinations inter-segmentaires - Résultat d’une coalition des contraintes neuromusculaires et spatiales (Dynamics of intersegmental coordination - Results from neuromuscular and spatial constraints)

Major: Human Movement Sciences, Advisor: J.-J. Temprado

 

PhD: October 2006

University of Marseille, France

 

Renaud Ronsse

Rhythmic movements control: Parallels between human behavior and robotics

Major: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Advisor: Rudolphe Sepulchre

PhD: May 2007

University of Liege, Belgium

 

Gregg Twietmeyer

Embodying kinesis: How Aristotle and Polanyi reshape the philosophy of kinesiology

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Scott Kretschmar

PhD: Spring 2008

Penn State University

 

Rajal Cohen

Ready for action: Fixational limb movements

reveal forthcoming voluntary movements

Major: Psychology, Advisor: David Rosenbaum

PhD: June 2008

Penn State University

 

Britne Shabbott

The contributions of visual information to reaching behaviors

Major: Integrative Biosciences, Special Field: Kinesiology, Advisor: Robert Sainburg

PhD: December 2008

Penn State University

 

Robrecht van der Wel

The flexible use of reference frames in human action planning

Major: Psychology, Advisor: David Rosenbaum

PhD: January 2009

Penn State University

 

Avijit Bakshi

A biomechanical and statistical mechanics analysis of human standing posture

Major: Physics and Ashton Graybiel Spatial Orientation Laboratory

Advisor: Paul Dizio and James Lackner

 

PhD: March 2009

Physics and Neuroscience,

Brandeis University

Virginia Chu

The role of variability in human motor learning

Major: Bioengineering, Advisor: Terrence Sanger

PhD: August 2009

Bioengineering, Stanford University

Rajiv Ranganathan

Utilizing redundancy in motor learning

Major: Kinesiology, Advisor: Karl Newell

PhD: August 2009

Kinesiology, Penn State University

 

Amanda Hitchcock

Mechanisms for maintaining stability in the helmeted guinea fowl, Numida meleagris, when running on uneven terrain

Major: Biology, Advisor: Richard Marsh

MS: 2010

Biology, Northeastern University

 

Sarah Degallier

Rhythmic and discrete movements

Major: Computer and Communication Science, Biorobotics

Advisor: Auke Ijspeert

PhD: September 2010

Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne, Switzerland

 

Hamal Marino

Rhythmic and discrete movements

Advisor:

MS: August 2012

Sant’Ana, Pisa, Italy

Stephen Smith

Role of reticulospinal neurons in the transition in lamprey

Major: Biology, Advisor: Joseph Ayers

PhD: 2013

Biology, Northeastern University

Andrew Yegian

The roles of muscles in arm swing and thoracic rotation during walking

Major: Biology, Advisor: Richard Marsh

MS: April 2012

Biology, Northeastern University

Hyunglae Lee

Major: Mechanical Engineering, Advisor: Neville Hogan

PhD: 2013

Mechanical Engineering, MIT

 

Lindsay Griffin

Exploring the relation between fatigue and cognitive-communication performance

Major: Speech, Language Pathology and Audiology

Advisor: Therese O’Neil-Pirozzi

 

MS: April 2012

Northeastern University

 

Peter Stein

TBA

Major: Physical Therapy

Advisor: Elliot Saltzman

PhD: 2014

Boston University

 

Tyler Susko

Analysis and verification of gait primitives for the restoration of gait via the development of a novel locomotion rehabilitation robot

Major: Mechanical Engineering

Advisor: Neville Hogan

PhD

Mechanical Engineering

MIT

 

 

Graduate Students Under My Current Supervision

 

Name

Time in Action Lab

Thesis Title

Anticipated Time of Completion

Se-Woong Park

2008 -

Learning and retention of discrete and rhythmic bimanual movements: Recall or relearning?

Major: Biology

Northeastern University

Meghan Huber

2011 -

Major: Bioengineering

Northeastern University

Zhaoran Zhang

2012 -

Major: Bioengineering

Northeastern University

Nick Korsantia

2012 -

Major: Biology

Northeastern University

Fei Ye

2013 -

Major: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Northeastern University

 

Postdoctoral Fellows

 

Name

Grant Support

Time in the Action Lab

Aymar de Rugy

NSF Grant BCS-0096543: Rhythmic and discrete dynamics in multijoint movements

2001 - 2003

Anil Maybhate

NIH Grant: R01 HD045639 Variability and stability in skill acquisition

2004 - 2006

Mohamed Tlili

NIH Grant: R01 HD045639 Variability and stability in skill acquisition

2006 - 2007

Masaki Abe

ONR Grant: Detection of anomalous behavior due to IEDs

2007 - 2010

Christopher J. Hasson

NIH Grant: R01 HD045639 Variability and stability in skill acquisition

NIH F32 Postdoctoral training grant

2009 - 2012

Anastasia Kyvelidou

AHA grant on gait rehabilitation in stroke patients

2011 - 2012

Bahman Nasseroleslami

NIH Grant: R01 HD045639 Variability and stability in skill acquisition

2012 -

Nikita Kuznetsov

NIH Grant: R01 HD045639 Variability and stability in skill acquisition

2013 -



 

III. Professional Services

 

        Organization and Program Committees AT UNIVERSITY

2012 - 2013

 

Member of the Search Committee for the Chair of Biology

2012-2013

 

Member of Search Committee for a position in Network Science, Department of Physics

2012 – 2013

 

Member of Senate Committee for Academic Policy

2012 – 2013

 

Member of the Full Professor Advisory Committee at the College of Science

2011 – 2012

 

Member of Senate Agenda Committee for Evaluation of Department Head in Physical Therapy

2010 – 2011

 

Member of Senate Agenda Committee for Research and Policy Oversight

2009 – 2010

 

Member of Search Committee for Dean of College of Science

2009 – 2010

 

Chair of Search Committee for Senior Faculty in Movement Neuroscience

2009 –

 

Member of the Bioengineering PhD Graduate Committee, Northeastern University

2009 –

 

Member of the Promotion and Tenure Committee of the Physical Therapy Department

2009 – 2011

 

Member of the University Standing Tenure Appeals Committee, Northeastern University

2009

 

Member of the College Restructuring Committee, Northeastern University

2007 – 2008

 

Member of the Promotion and Tenure Committee, Department of Kinesiology, Pennsylvania State University

2006 – 2008

 

Member of the Steering Committee of the Penn State Neuroscience Institute

2005 – 2008

 

Member of the WISE Advisory Committee (Women in Science and Engineering)

2005 – 2008

 

Member or Chair of the Awards Committee

2004 – 2008

 

Member of the International Advisory Board of the Dean of the College of Health and Human Development

2002 – 2005

 

Faculty advisor to the Honor Society of the College of Health and Human Development

2002 – 2004

 

Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Libraries of the Pennsylvania State University

2000 – 2005

 

Member of the Faculty Senate of the Pennsylvania State University

2003 – 2005

 

Member of the Curriculum Committee

2000 – 2001

 

Member of the Advisory Board of the Department of Kinesiology

1995 – now

 

Member of the Candidacy Exam Committee in Motor Control

1997 – 2003

 

Chair of the Candidacy Committee in Motor Control

 

    Organization Committees at External Associations And Conferences

2012

 

Organization of Lab Advance  - Recent Research of the Newman Lab and the Action Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, September 15, 2012

2011

 

Organization of Lab Advance  - Recent Research of the Newman Lab and the Action Lab, Northeastern University, August 25, 2011

2010

 

Organization of Lab Advance  - Recent Research of the Newman Lab and the Action Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, August 21, 2010

2010 – 2011

 

Member of the Advisory Committee for the Organization of the International Conference: “Progress in Motor Control VIII”, Cincinnati, July 2011

2008

 

Member of the grant review panel for the National Science Foundation, Cyber-Enabled Discovery, Special topic: Complexity

2008 –

 

Member of the Organizing Committee of the International Conference “Progress in Motor Control VII”, Marseille, France, August, 2009

2006 – 2008

 

Member of the grant review panel for the National Science Foundation, Program Perception, Cognition and Action

1995 – 2008

 

Organization of the bi-weekly seminar series “Penn State Action Club” with invited speakers on topics of motor control

2006 – 2008

 

Temporary member of the study section “Motor Function, Speech and Rehabilitation” (MFSR) at the National Institute of Health

2006 – 2007

 

Member of the Organizing Committee of the International Conference “Progress in Motor Control VI”, Santos, Brazil, August, 2007

2005 – now

 

Member of the NIH Taskforce on Childhood Motor Disorders

2004 – 2005

 

Chair of the Organization of the 5th International Conference “Progress in Motor Control”, held at Penn State August 17-20, 2005

May 6–9, 2004

 

Organization of the third workshop “Debates in Dynamics III” held at Penn State

2002 – now

 

Member of the Executive Committee of the International Society for Motor Control

2001

 

Member of review committee in the organization of the annual conference of NASPSPA (North American Society of Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity)

December 7–11,

2000

 

Organization of the second workshop sponsored by the Santa Fe Institute "Debates in Dynamics: Modeling Action and Perception II" held at The Pennsylvania State University

August 16–19, 1999

 

Organization of the first workshop sponsored by the Santa Fe Institute "Debates in Dynamics: Modeling Action and Perception" held at The Pennsylvania State University

1999

:

Member of the organizing committee of the International Conference on “Progress in Motor Control II” in August, 19-22, 1999 at The Pennsylvania State University

Editorial Work

2011 –                              Member of the Editorial Board of Biomathematics

2010                                 Guest Editor for special issue in Journal of Motor Behavior: Theoretical ideas in motor     neuroscience and their capacity for falsification

2009 – now                      Consulting Editor of Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

2005 – now                      Executive Editor of Journal of Motor Behavior

1997 – 2005                      Member of the Editorial Board of Journal of Motor Behavior

2001                                 Guest Editor for Human Movement Science: Special issue on “Debates in Dynamics”